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FIGURE 3-1 STEM workforce by occupational group, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000 (in thousands).
SOURCE: CPST (2006a, p. 3).

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FIGURE 3-2 Distribution of STEM workforce by occupational group, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000. SOURCE: Data are from CPST (2006a). Tabulations by the National Research Council.

CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED STEM LABOR MARKET

Data available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Employment Projections Program is used to examine the current STEM labor market in the United States and the anticipated growth of STEM jobs. This program makes ten-year employment projections every 2 years. The most recent projections estimate the number of job openings that are expected to arise between 2010 and 2020. Expected job openings in a given occupation are due to two sources: (1) job openings that are the result of expected growth in employment in an occupation (i.e., new jobs) and (2) job openings that arise from the need to replace people who are expected to leave an occupation (for example, due to



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