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FIGURE S-2 Age distribution of Department of Defense civilian STEM workforce, selected years: 2001, 2006, and 2011.
NOTE: Figures are as of the fiscal year-end (e.g., September 30, 2011).
SOURCE: Data provided by the Defense Manpower Data Center. Tabulations by the National Research Council.

• The “defense industry,” composed of the principal DOD contractors, is moving to diversify away from defense for economic reasons (Thompson, 2011)—and because of the complexities in dealing with a powerful monopsonist (i.e., a sole) buyer.

• Because of economic circumstances, the nation is unlikely to be able to support defense expenditures at the levels of the past (Appelbaum, 2012), and DOD’s traditional predilection is not to give highest priority to funding for research (National Research Council, 2008, 2011).

• Technology today has a half-life measured in a few years, whereas major DOD development programs can take decades—making it nearly impossible under current practices to supply U.S. armed forces with the most advanced technology (National Research Council, 2010a, 2012a).

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FIGURE S-3 Retirement eligibility of selected occupational groups in the DOD civilian STEM workforce.
NOTE: Percentages are as of the fiscal year-end (September 30, 2011).
SOURCE: Data provided by the Defense Manpower Data Center. Tabulations by the National Research Council.



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