Appendix A

Biographic Sketches of Committee Members

Hendrick W. Ruck (Chair) is CEO and president of the Human Performance Consulting Group, LLC (HPCG). Company accomplishments include advising the medical-network CEO on planning, visioning, and building patient-care innovation; enhancing applied research; growth in clinical trials; and initiation of translational research programs. Dr. Ruck served as associate director, special team, in the Office of Science and Technology Policy, where he led a White House team to bring education technology from academic and government laboratories to education and training settings in the United States. He served as director of Air Force Research Laboratory human effectiveness, where he led a 1,200-person research group in training methods and systems; system interface design technologies; physiologic, psychologic, and physical effects of extreme environments on individual and team performance; and personnel protection. Dr. Ruck received the Presidential Rank Award in 2007. He holds a PhD in applied (industrial/organizational) psychology, an MMS in management science, and a BS, all from the Stevens Institute of Technology.

Julie J.C.H. Ryan (Vice Chair) is associate professor and chair of engineering management and systems engineering at George Washington University. She holds a BS in humanities from the US Air Force Academy, an MLS in technology from Eastern Michigan University, and a DSc in engineering management from George Washington University. Dr. Ryan began her career as an intelligence officer in the US Air Force and the US Defense Intelligence Agency. After leaving government service, she continued to serve US national-security interests in positions in industry. Her interests are in information-security and information-warfare research. She was a member of the National Research Council Naval Studies Board from 1995 to 1998.

Alice M. Agogino (NAE) is the Roscoe and Elizabeth Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering and an affiliated faculty member of the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) Haas School of Business. She also directs the Berkeley Expert Systems Technology Laboratory and the Berkeley Instructional Technology Studio. She has served in a number of administrative positions at UCB, including associate dean of engineering and faculty assistant to the executive vice chancellor and provost in educational development and technology. She continues as principal investigator for the National Engineering Education Delivery System and the digital libraries of courseware in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. She received a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of New Mexico (1975), an MS in mechanical engineering (1978) from UCB, and a PhD from the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems of Stanford University (1984). She is a member of the Association of Women in Science and received the National Science Foundation Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars in 2004. She served as member of the Committee on Women in Academic Science and



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Appendix A Biographic Sketches of Committee Members Hendrick W. Ruck (Chair) is CEO and president of the Human Performance Consulting Group, LLC (HPCG). Company accomplishments include advising the medical-network CEO on planning, visioning, and building patient-care innovation; enhancing applied research; growth in clinical trials; and initiation of translational research programs. Dr. Ruck served as associate director, special team, in the Office of Science and Technology Policy, where he led a White House team to bring education technology from academic and government laboratories to education and training settings in the United States. He served as director of Air Force Research Laboratory human effectiveness, where he led a 1,200-person research group in training methods and systems; system interface design technologies; physiologic, psychologic, and physical effects of extreme environments on individual and team performance; and personnel protection. Dr. Ruck received the Presidential Rank Award in 2007. He holds a PhD in applied (industrial/organizational) psychology, an MMS in management science, and a BS, all from the Stevens Institute of Technology. Julie J.C.H. Ryan (Vice Chair) is associate professor and chair of engineering management and systems engineering at George Washington University. She holds a BS in humanities from the US Air Force Academy, an MLS in technology from Eastern Michigan University, and a DSc in engineering management from George Washington University. Dr. Ryan began her career as an intelligence officer in the US Air Force and the US Defense Intelligence Agency. After leaving government service, she continued to serve US national-security interests in positions in industry. Her interests are in information-security and information-warfare research. She was a member of the National Research Council Naval Studies Board from 1995 to 1998. Alice M. Agogino (NAE) is the Roscoe and Elizabeth Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering and an affiliated faculty member of the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) Haas School of Business. She also directs the Berkeley Expert Systems Technology Laboratory and the Berkeley Instructional Technology Studio. She has served in a number of administrative positions at UCB, including associate dean of engineering and faculty assistant to the executive vice chancellor and provost in educational development and technology. She continues as principal investigator for the National Engineering Education Delivery System and the digital libraries of courseware in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. She received a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of New Mexico (1975), an MS in mechanical engineering (1978) from UCB, and a PhD from the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems of Stanford University (1984). She is a member of the Association of Women in Science and received the National Science Foundation Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars in 2004. She served as member of the Committee on Women in Academic Science and 45

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46 HUMAN PERFORMANCE MODIFICATION: REVIEW OF WORLDWIDE RESEARCH Engineering of the National Academies Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Debra Auguste is an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the City College of New York. Previously she was an assistant professor of biomedical engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences of Harvard University and an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery of Harvard Medical School. Earlier, she was a postdoctoral associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her interests include drug and gene delivery, targeted delivery, stimulus-sensitive materials, and scaffolds for tissue engineering. Dr. Auguste is the principal investigator on grants from the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). She is a recipient of various awards, including the NSF CAREER Award in 2011, the DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2009, the Percy Julien Award for Outstanding Scientist of the Year in 2008, the ONR Young Investigator Award in 2007, the JDRF Innovation Award in 2007, the 1930 Wallace Memorial Honorific Fellowship in 2003, and several fellowships. In addition, Dr. Auguste was named to the 50 Most Influential African Americans in Technology list in 2009. She received her SB in chemical engineering from MIT in 1999 and her PhD in chemical engineering from Princeton University in 2005. Steven G. Boxer (NAS) is the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University. His research interests include model membranes, energy and electron transfer dynamics in photosynthetic reaction centers, electrostatics and dynamics in proteins, and excited- state dynamics in green fluorescent proteins. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Biophysical Society, and the Royal Society of Chemistry. In 2008, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. He won the Max Tishler Award for Tufts University in 2007 and the Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy in 2008. Dr. Boxer holds a BS in chemistry from Tufts University and a PhD in physical and physical-organic chemistry from the University of Chicago. Christopher C. Green is assistant dean for Asia Pacific of the Wayne State School of Medicine (SOM). He is also a clinical fellow and professor in neuroimaging and magnetic resonance imaging in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences of SOM and the Detroit Medical Center (DMC). His medical specialties are brain imaging and forensic neurology, and his personal medical practice is in the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. He serves on many government advisory groups and private-sector corporate boards of directors. Immediately before his current position, he was executive director for emergent technology research for SOM and DMC. From 1985 through 2004, he was executive director for global technology policy and chief technology officer for General Motors Asia-Pacific Operations. His career at General Motors included positions as head of biomedical sciences research and executive director of the General Motors Research Laboratory for Materials and Environmental Sciences. His career with the Central Intelligence Agency extended from 1969 to 1985 as a senior division analyst and assistant national intelligence officer for science and technology. His PhD in neurophysiology is from the University of Colorado Medical School, and his MD is from the Autonomous City University in El Paso, Texas, and Monterey, Mexico, with honors. He also holds the National Intelligence Medal and is a fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Hendrik F. Hamann is currently a research manager for physical analytics in the Physical Sciences Department at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York. In 1995 he joined JILA (Joint institute between the University of Colorado and NIST) as a research associate in Boulder, Colorado. During his tenure at JILA he developed novel near-field optical

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APPENDIX A 47 microscopes to study single molecules at high spatial resolution. Since 2001, he has led the Physical Analytics program in IBM Research, first as a research staff member and currently as a research manager. His current research interest includes nanoscale heat transfer and energy management of large-scale computing systems as well as novel applications of physical modeling to infrastructure. He has authored and co-authored more than 80 peer-reviewed scientific papers and holds over 55 patents and has over 35 pending patent applications. Dr. Hamann is an IBM master inventor and has served on governmental committees such as with the National Academy of Sciences and as an industrial advisor to universities. He is a member of the American Physical Society (APS), Optical Society of America (OSA), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the New York Academy of Sciences. Dr. Hamann received a diploma in chemical physics (1992) and his PhD (1995) from the University of Göttingen, Germany. James C. Miller is a human-factors consultant in San Antonio, Texas. He provides expertise to the Control Room Management Team of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation and supports applied psychophysiologic research in the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine. Dr. Miller was the founding director of the Human Environmental Research Center at the U.S. Air Force Academy (USAFA), Colorado Springs, Colorado. He also helped to design and then chaired the USAFA Institutional Review Board for the protection of human subjects in research from 1998 to 2000. In 2000, Dr. Miller helped to create the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Warfighter Fatigue Countermeasures R&D Group at Brooks City-Base in San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Miller is a certificant of the Board of Certification in Professional Ergonomics and reviews applications for certification. He is the author of the book Fatigue in the Controlling Pilot Error series of McGraw-Hill (2001), a former founding associate editor of Ergonomics in Design, a former reviewer for Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, and author of the report Fatigue Effects and Countermeasures in 24/7 Security Operations for the ASIS Foundation (2010). He is a former chair of the Department of Defense Human Factors Engineering Technical Advisory Group and an emeritus member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and the Aerospace Medical Association. In 2007, he received the Henry L. Taylor Founder’s Award for outstanding contributions in the field of aerospace human factors from the Aerospace Human Factors Association. Dr. Miller received his BA in analytic biology and his PhD in biology (environmental physiology) from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Joanna Mirecki Millunchick is a professor of materials science and engineering and is affiliated with the Applied Physics Program and the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics at the University of Michigan. Her general research interests involve manipulating matter on the nanoscale to enable the design of new electronic materials for optoelectronic and microelectronic applications. Her specific interests are in the materials and surface sciences of semiconductor thin-film nucleation and epitaxy, using a number of growth platforms, including molecular-beam epitaxy, chemical-vapor deposition, and ion-assisted deposition. A variety of characterization techniques are used to study structural properties (reflection high-energy electron diffraction, x- ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy), electronic properties (Hall and resistivity measurements), and optical properties (photoluminescence) of these films. Dr. Millunchick has received several awards, including the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Sloan Foundation Pre-Tenure Fellowship, and the John F. Ullrich Education Excellence Award from the University of Michigan. She received her BS in physics from DePaul University in Chicago in 1990 and her PhD in materials science and engineering from Northwestern University in Evanston in 1995. Donald Norman (NAE) is a cofounder of the Nielsen Norman Group; a professor emeritus of the University of California, San Diego, where he served as chair of the Psychology Department and

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48 HUMAN PERFORMANCE MODIFICATION: REVIEW OF WORLDWIDE RESEARCH founder and chair of the Cognitive Science Department and Breed Professor of Design emeritus; and professor emeritus of electrical engineering and computer science of Northwestern University. He is a former vice president of Apple and a former executive of Hewlett Packard. Dr. Norman serves as an IDEO Fellow and is on company boards and advisory boards. He has been Distinguished Visiting Professor of Industrial Design at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). He has received honorary degrees from the University of Padua (Italy) and the Technical University of Delft (the Netherlands); the Lifetime Achievement Award from SIGCHI, the professional organization for computer–human interaction; and the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science from the Franklin Institute (Philadelphia). He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Association for Computing Machinery, the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and the Design Research Society. He serves on the Board of Trustees of IIT’s Institute of Design in Chicago. His books include numerous textbooks and monographs in psychology and cognitive science and, most recently, books on design: The Design of Everyday Things, Things That Make Us Smart, Emotional Design, and Living with Complexity. Laurie Zoloth, a Charles Deering McCormick Professor of Teaching Excellence, is director of the Brady Program in Ethics and Civic Life at Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University, and was the founding director of the Center for Bioethics, Science and Society at Northwestern University`s Feinberg School of Medicine. She teaches in the Medical Humanities and Bioethics Program, in the Jewish Studies program, and as a professor of religious studies. From 1995 to 2003, she was a founder and director of the Program in Jewish Studies of San Francisco State University. In 2011, she was elected vice president of the American Academy of Religion. In 2001, she was the president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, she was a two-term member of its founding board, and she received its Distinguished Service Award in 2007. She was a founder and vice president of the Society for Jewish Ethics and is a current board member. She served two terms as a member of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) National Advisory Council, the nation's highest civilian advisory board for NASA, for which she received the NASA National Public Service Award in 2005; the Executive Committee of the International Society for Stem Cell Research; and she was the founding chair of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Bioethics Advisory Board. She has also been on the founding national boards of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, the International Society for Stem Cell Research, the Society for Scriptural Reasoning, and NASA’s International Planetary Protection Advisory Committee. In 2005, she was honored as the Graduate Theological Union’s alumna of the year; and in 2009, she received Northwestern University`s most distinguished award for teaching. In 2011, she was named to the City of Evanston Environmental Board. Dr. Zoloth received her doctorate in social ethics from the Graduate Theological Union and an MA in Jewish Studies from Graduate Theological Union, The Center for Jewish Studies in May 1993; an MA in English from California State University (San Francisco State) in 1991; a BSN from the University of the State of New York in 1982; and a BA in women’s studies from the University of California, Berkeley (Phi Beta Kappa and Cum Laude) in 1974.