Appendix A

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Michael M. E. Johns, M.D. (Co-Chair), is the chancellor of Emory University and executive vice president for health affairs, emeritus. Before he became chancellor in 2007, he led Emory’s Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center from 1996 to 2007. The center is the largest, most comprehensive health care system in Georgia, and he led its extensive facilities improvement plan, which included new biomedical research, nursing school, vaccine center, and cancer institute buildings, and the complete reconfiguration and rebuilding of Emory’s midtown Crawford Long Hospital (now Emory University Hospital Midtown) campus. Dr. Johns co-chaired Emory’s University-wide Strategic Planning Committee that set the strategic direction of the university for the next decade or more. From 1990 to 1996, he served as dean of the School of Medicine, vice president of the medical faculty, and head of the physician practice plan at the Johns Hopkins University. Prior to that, beginning in 1984 as a professor and chair of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Johns Hopkins, he also served as associate dean for clinical practice and reorganized the faculty practice plan, and planned and developed the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center. Joining the Department of Otolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Virginia Medical Center in 1977, he rose from the position of assistant professor to professor. From 1975 to 1977, he served as assistant chief of the Otolaryngology Service at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Dr. Johns has been a significant contributor to many of the leading organizations and policy groups in health care, including the



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS Michael M. E. Johns, M.D. (Co-Chair), is the chancellor of Emory Uni- versity and executive vice president for health affairs, emeritus. Before he became chancellor in 2007, he led Emory’s Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center from 1996 to 2007. The center is the largest, most com- prehensive health care system in Georgia, and he led its extensive facili- ties improvement plan, which included new biomedical research, nursing school, vaccine center, and cancer institute buildings, and the complete re- configuration and rebuilding of Emory’s midtown Crawford Long Hospital (now Emory University Hospital Midtown) campus. Dr. Johns co-chaired Emory’s University-wide Strategic Planning Committee that set the strategic direction of the university for the next decade or more. From 1990 to 1996, he served as dean of the School of Medicine, vice president of the medi- cal faculty, and head of the physician practice plan at the Johns Hopkins University. Prior to that, beginning in 1984 as a professor and chair of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Johns Hopkins, he also served as associate dean for clinical practice and reorganized the faculty practice plan, and planned and developed the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center. Joining the Department of Otolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Virginia Medical Center in 1977, he rose from the posi- tion of assistant professor to professor. From 1975 to 1977, he served as assistant chief of the Otolaryngology Service at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Dr. Johns has been a significant contributor to many of the leading organizations and policy groups in health care, including the 179

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180 LOVELL FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER MERGER Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the Commonwealth Fund Task Force on Academic Health Centers, and the Association of Aca- demic Health Centers (AAHC). Dr. Johns serves on the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences’ (USUHS’s) Board of Regents, as well as on various other boards, including Johnson & Johnson, the Genuine Parts Company, AMN Healthcare, the National Health Museum, and the Satcher Health Leadership Institute. He is a past member of the National Governing Board of the Clinical Center and of the Council of the National Center for Research Resources of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He has served as a member of the board of directors and as president of the American Board of Otolaryngology, as chair of the AAHC, and as chair of the AAMC’s Council of Deans. He served as editor of the Archives of Oto- laryngology from 1992 to 2005, and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Johns received his bach- elor’s degree from Wayne State University and graduated with distinction from the University of Michigan Medical School, where he remained for his internship and residency. He is an Institute of Medicine (IOM) member and has served as vice chair of the IOM Council and as a member of the Governing Board of the National Research Council, as well as on many committees, including as chair of the Committee on Optimizing Graduate Medical Trainee (Resident) Hours and Work Schedules to Improve Patient Safety from 2007 to 2009. Stephen M. Shortell, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.B.A. (Co-Chair), is the dean of the School of Public Health, Blue Cross of California Distinguished Professor of Health Policy & Management, and professor of organization behavior in the School of Public Health and the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley. He has affiliated appointments to the Department of Sociology and serves as a member of the Center for Health Research, the Industrial Relations Institute, and the Institute for Personal- ity and Social Research at the University of California, Berkeley, and at the Institute for Health Policy Research at the University of California, San Francisco. His research interests include organizational correlates of quality and outcomes of care; the evaluation of total quality management and community-based health improvement initiatives; strategic change in the health care sector (i.e., evolution of integrated delivery systems); and strategic alliances between physicians and other health entities. He teaches courses in strategic management of health services and organization be- havior in health. Dr. Shortell was A.C. Buehler Distinguished Professor of Health Services Management and professor of organization behavior in the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University from 1982 to 1998. He was assistant professor from 1974 to 1976, associ- ate professor from 1976 to 1979, and professor from 1979 to 1982 in the

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APPENDIX A 181 School of Public Health and Community Medicine in the Department of Health Services at the University of Washington. Dr. Shortell has published 14 books and monographs, and more than 250 reports and editorials. He received his B.B.A. in business administration from the University of Notre Dame, his M.P.H. in hospital administration/public health from the Univer- sity of California, Los Angeles, and his M.B.A. in business administration and Ph.D. in behavioral science from the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business. He is an IOM member and has served as a member of the IOM Council and on its executive committee. Dr. Shortell is past chair of the Gustave Lienhard Award committee. He has also served as a member of the IOM Membership Committee and the Section 11 chair of the IOM Membership Section Leaders. In addition, he has been a member of many committees, including serving as the chair of the Subcommittee on Quality Improvement Organizations’ Evaluation from 2004 to 2006. Nancy R. Adams, R.N., M.S.N., is a senior partner with Martin, Blanck & Associates (Martin-Blanck), a federal health services consulting firm based in Falls Church, Virginia. Martin-Blanck provides critical assistance to public and private sector clients focused on federal and state health care delivery systems. Martin-Blanck has more than two dozen senior executive partners with expertise in health care policy, program develop- ment, management, informatics, and strategic planning. Ms. Adams joined Martin-Blanck in August 2005 after a distinguished career as a military officer and as a senior executive in the federal government. She is one of Martin-Blanck’s leading experts on federal health acquisition policies and procedures. In addition, she brings extensive clinical, administrative, and senior management experience with large, complex government health care systems, and has demonstrated experience and competency as an organizational leader, an effective communicator, and a resource manager with results that have produced performance improvements. Ms. Adams served as the source selection authority for five major, multibillion-dollar health care procurements for the Department of Defense (DoD). All pro- curements were accomplished on time and two awards were sustained on appeal with the General Accounting Office. In addition to shepherding the unprecedented contracting effort to completion, she also defined the business planning process and the organizational structure for the military services and TRICARE Management Activity to administer the three re- gional health care support contracts. Following the procurement process, Ms. Adams was the initial regional director for the TRICARE Regional Office-North and was responsible for managing the DoD health care con- tract for 20 state regions, worth more than $1 billion annually. From 1998 to 2002, Ms. Adams (MG rank) served as the commanding general of the Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii, a 266-bed tertiary care medical

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182 LOVELL FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER MERGER center with 3,000 personnel and a $245 million annual budget. She led the organization to a perfect score on the survey by the Joint Commission. She also had responsibility for TRICARE Pacific, serving 527,960 beneficiaries in Hawaii and throughout the Pacific. Prior to this command, Ms. Adams (BG rank) commanded the William Beaumont Army Medical Center at Fort Bliss, Texas, a 200-bed tertiary care medical center with 1,800 personnel serving 400,000 beneficiaries. From 1991 to 1995, she served concurrently as the chief of the Army Nurse Corps and the assistant surgeon for person- nel, and was the first commander of the newly created Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine. Prior to these leadership positions, she served in a variety of clinical nursing and nursing administration positions in the U.S. Army Medical Department and the DoD. Ms. Adams holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Cornell University and a master’s degree in nursing from Catholic University. She is a fellow in the American Acad- emy of Nursing (AAN). George K. Anderson, M.D., M.P.H., is executive director of the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States (AMSUS). AMSUS, the nonprofit society of the federal health agencies, operates from a headquarters located in Bethesda, Maryland. He is an experienced physician executive who, prior to his current position at AMSUS, was an independent medical technology consultant. He served as chief executive officer at Oceania, Inc., a medical software company, from 1999 to 2001, and as chief executive officer of the Koop Foundation from 1997 to 1998. Dr. Anderson was in military service for 30 years and retired from active duty in the grade of major gen- eral. He served in the Air Force as a flight surgeon, an aerospace medicine staff officer, and a commander of several medical organizations in Korea, Germany, and the United States. He serves as a director of the Environ- mental Tectonics Corporation, in Southhampton, Pennsylvania, as well as on several advisory boards and groups. Dr. Anderson received his M.P.H. degree from Tulane University and his M.D. degree from the University of Michigan Medical School. He is a past president of the American College of Preventive Medicine, a past chairman of the American Board of Preventive Medicine, and currently serves on the IOM Board on the Health of Select Populations (BSP) and the Defense Health Board. Peter B. Angood, M.D., is the chief executive officer of the American College of Physician Executives (ACPE). Prior to joining the ACPE, he provided senior executive health care consultant experience for small-, medium-, and large-size health care organizations across a variety of focus areas. He recently completed a 2-year engagement with the National Qual- ity Forum (NQF) as a senior advisor on patient safety and continues with the NQF part time to help guide projects focused on improving national

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APPENDIX A 183 patient safety and health care quality. He also recently provided technical expertise on projects related to the National Priorities Partnership’s goal of improving the safety of America’s health care system. Prior to engaging as a health care consultant, Dr. Angood was the chief patient safety officer and a vice president for the Joint Commission, where he oversaw the annual development of the commission’s national patient safety goals and several other enterprise-wide patient safety initiatives. He continues to work with the World Health Organization’s Alliance for Patient Safety initiative after helping to lead early development of the organization’s Collaborating Cen- ter for Patient Safety Solutions and other patient safety programs. After initially practicing with the hospitals of McGill University, Dr. Angood was subsequently recruited into surgery faculty and hospital administrative po- sitions at the University of Pennsylvania, Yale University, and Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining the Joint Commission, he was a pro- fessor of surgery, anesthesia, and emergency medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Angood is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons (Canada), the American College of Surgeons, and the American College of Critical Care Medicine. He has a history of active committee in- volvement with numerous professional medical societies and recently served as president for the Society of Critical Care Medicine, a 14,000-member international organization. Dr. Angood is author of approximately 130 peer-reviewed articles, abstracts, editorials, and book chapters. His research interests have addressed leading-edge clinical care problems, patient safety, injury prevention, benchmarking, outcomes management, resource utiliza- tion, health services, medical education, advanced medical and telemedicine technologies, and the utility of simulation technology. Dr. Angood received his medical degree from the University of Manitoba in Canada and com- pleted his training in general surgery at McGill University in Montreal, as well as fellowship training in trauma surgery and critical care medicine at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. Lawton R. (Robert) Burns, Ph.D., M.B.A., is chair of the Health Care Management Department, James Joo-Jin Kim Professor, and professor of health care management in the Wharton School at the University of Penn- sylvania. He is also director of the Wharton Center for Health Management & Economics. He teaches courses on health care strategy, strategic change, organization and management, managed care, and integrated delivery sys- tems. From 1998 to 2002, he was a visiting professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, where he taught corporate strategy to physicians. Dr. Burns taught previ- ously in the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago and the College of Business Administration at the University of Arizona. He has analyzed physician-organization integration over the past 25 years. In

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184 LOVELL FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER MERGER recognition of this research, he was named the Edwin L. Crosby Memorial Fellow by the Hospital Research and Educational Trust in 1992. Dr. Burns has also published several papers on the array of vehicles for integrat- ing physicians and hospitals, the structure and performance of physician networks, the market forces that shape the growth of group practices and investor-owned networks, and the organizational options for physicians in a consolidating industry. In addition to this research, Dr. Burns has con- ducted extensive analyses of the Allegheny Health Education & Research Foundation bankruptcy, and is now completing a book on the bankruptcy and the Philadelphia hospital market. He has completed a book on supply chain management in the health care industry, titled The Health Care Value Chain (Jossey-Bass, 2002). The study focuses on the strategic alliances and partnerships developing between pharmaceutical firms and distributors, disposable manufacturers, medical device manufacturers, group purchas- ing organizations, and organized delivery systems. He has also completed a companion volume, The Business of Healthcare Innovation (Cambridge University Press, 2005), which examines the market structure and trends in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device, and information system sectors of the global health care industry. Dr. Burns received an Investigator Award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study the reasons for failure in organizational change efforts by health care providers. Dr. Burns served on the editorial board of Health Services Research. He is a past member of the Grant Review Study Section for the Agency for Health Care Policy & Research. He is also a life fellow of Clare Hall at the University of Cambridge. He received his doctorate in sociology and his M.B.A. in health administration from the University of Chicago. Dr. Burns served on the IOM Board on Health Care Services from 2003 to 2006. Emmanuel G. Cassimatis, M.D., is president and chief executive officer of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG®) and chair of the board of directors of the Foundation for the Advancement of International Medical Education and Research, a separate, nonprofit foundation of the ECFMG. Prior to joining the ECFMG on July 1, 2009, he served as the vice president for affiliations and international affairs and the associate dean for clinical affairs and professor of psychiatry, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, USUHS. In addition to his duties at the ECFMG, Dr. Cassimatis continues to serve as professor of psychiatry at the USUHS School of Medicine. Dr. Cassimatis served on active duty with the U.S. Army for more than 25 years. His military assignments included tours as director of psychiatric residency training at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, psychiatry consultant to the Army Surgeon General, and director of medical education for the U.S. Army Medical Department. His military awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal and the Legion

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APPENDIX A 185 of Merit (with Oak Leaf Cluster). Dr. Cassimatis is a member of the U.S. Medical License Examination Composite Committee and the World Federa- tion for Medical Education Executive Council, and president of the Hellenic American Psychiatric Association (APA). He was a delegate to the American Medical Association (AMA) House from the AMSUS for many years, and was a member and chair of the AMA’s Council on Medical Education, Sec- tion Council on Federal and Military Medicine, and Specialty and Service Society. Dr. Cassimatis also completed 4 years on the Institutional Review Committee and 7 years on the board of directors of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the last 2 years as chair. He is a life fellow of AMSUS, a fellow of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, and a distinguished life fellow of the APA. Dr. Cassimatis is a graduate of the University of Chicago, the Harvard Medical School, and the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute. He recently served on the IOM Committee on Qualifications of Professionals Providing Mental Health Counseling Services under TRICARE from 2009 to 2010. Timothy C. Flynn, M.D., became senior associate dean for clinical affairs at the University of Florida College of Medicine and chief medical officer for Shands Hospital at the University of Florida in September 2010. In both roles, he serves as a point person for planning and implementing qual- ity and patient safety initiatives, areas he has focused on throughout his career at the College of Medicine, and especially while serving as interim senior associate dean for clinical affairs. In his 26 years with the college, Dr. Flynn has filled a number of leadership roles, including chief of surgery at the Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center, program director for the general surgery residency, and associate dean for graduate medical education. As a professor of surgery, he has distinguished himself nationally in graduate medical education and academic surgery. After his Navy service and his residency, he served as an assistant professor at the University of Texas Medical School for 4 years before going to the University of Florida in 1984. He has held several national appointments with the Veterans Ad- ministration. He is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society and has served as president of the Alachua County Medical Society. In 2010, he was elected chair of the ACGME’s board of directors. In addi- tion, he is chair of the American College of Surgeons Board of Governors, a past chair of the American Board of Surgery, and former president of the Association of Program Directors in Surgery and the Association of VA Surgeons. Dr. Flynn graduated from Louisiana State University with a bachelor’s degree in zoology in 1971 and earned his medical degree from the Baylor College of Medicine in 1974. He completed his surgery residency at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, Texas, and

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186 LOVELL FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER MERGER is board certified in general surgery, vascular surgery, and surgical critical care. Larry M. Manheim, Ph.D., is a research professor in the Institute for Healthcare Studies and the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabili- tation, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. His interests have involved using large datasets to (1) look at aging and individual risks of high medical costs, disability, and long-term care use; (2) analyze hospital and post-acute care organization responses to changes in Medicare payment rules using Medicare data; and (3) evaluate cost effectiveness of health care system interventions using primary interview and Medicare data. Dr. Manheim has a master’s degree in statistics and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. John E. Maupin, Jr., D.D.S., M.B.A., is president and chief executive officer of Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) and has more than 30 years of experience in health care administration, public health, and academic medi- cine. Prior to joining MSM on July 1, 2006, Dr. Maupin served as president of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, for 12 years. His other senior administrative positions have included executive vice president and chief operating officer of MSM; executive director, Morehouse Medical Associates; chief executive officer of Southside Healthcare, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia; deputy commissioner for Medical Services, Baltimore City Health Department, Baltimore, Maryland; and dental director and chief of medical staff, West Baltimore Community Health Center. Dr. Maupin was a career dental officer in the U.S. Army Reserves, retiring in 1997 with more than 28 years of service, including 2 years of active duty at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC, and 9 months of active duty service during Desert Shield/Desert Storm. He has served on numerous health-related task forces, scientific panels, and advisory councils. Most notably, he was recently appointed to the National Health Care Workforce Commission. Dr. Maupin is past president of the National Dental Associa- tion and the Association of Minority Health Profession Schools. He also currently serves on the board of directors of LifePoint Hospitals, Inc., a nonurban, acute care hospital management company; HealthSouth, Inc., a national rehabilitative health care services management company; and Regions Financial Corporation, a regional multibank holding company. Dr. Maupin attended San Jose State College and earned a D.D.S. degree in 1972 from Meharry Medical College School of Dentistry. The following year he completed a general dentistry residency at Provident Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, and subsequently received an M.B.A. degree in 1979 from Loyola College in Baltimore.

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APPENDIX A 187 Karen L. Miller, R.N., Ph.D., is the senior vice chancellor for academic and student affairs at the University of Kansas Medical Center. She has also served as the dean of and a professor at the University of Kansas Schools of Nursing and Health Professions since 1996. Prior to her dean’s appoint- ment, Dr. Miller was the vice president and a chief nursing officer at the Children’s Hospital, Denver, and an associate professor at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Dr. Miller has more than 35 years of health care executive experience. She completed her baccalaureate degree at Case Western Reserve University and received her master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Colorado. Her research has been in the areas of health systems, finance, and patient care outcomes in health care. Throughout her career, she has published and presented on organizational leadership in health care, financial management of clinical services, and nursing workforce issues. Dr. Miller is the president of KU HealthPartners, Inc., a University of Kansas faculty practice plan and direct clinical services corporation for nursing and allied health professionals. She also serves on the board of directors of the University of Kansas Hospital and the board of directors of the University of Kansas Research Institute. Among past national appointments, Dr. Miller was a member of the 2002 Commission on Workforce for Hospitals & Health Systems of the American Hospital Association. In 2004, Dr. Miller completed a 4-year term on the National Advisory Council on Nursing Education and Practice of the U.S. Depart- ment of Health and Human Services and she served from 1995 to 2000 on the National Advisory Council of the National Institute of Nursing Re- search (NINR) of the NIH. She served on the Workforce Advisory Council for the AAHC from 2005 to 2007 as a representative for nursing and allied health professions. In 2008, she completed a 2-year term as president of the Board of the Friends of the NINR. Dr. Miller commenced service on the board of directors of the Watson Caring Science Institute during 2011. She was named a fellow of the AAN in 1995 and a fellow of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions in 2010. Frances M. Murphy, M.D., M.P.H., is president of Sigma Health Con- sulting, LLC, a health services consulting firm located in Silver Spring, Maryland. Dr. Murphy serves as a consultant on health care management, public health, neurosciences and mental health, health information tech- nology, and veterans’ and military health. She has focused particularly on health information technology, in addition to the transformation of health care delivery systems. Prior to establishing Sigma Health Consulting, Dr. Murphy had a distinguished federal career, including more than 25 years as a physician, educator, researcher, and health care executive. From 1999 to 2002, she served as the Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA’s) deputy under secretary for health (DUSH) and chief operating officer for the VA’s

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188 LOVELL FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER MERGER integrated health care system. From 2002 to 2006, she served as the DUSH for health policy coordination and worked extensively on improving mental health care services as the VA’s member of the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. Dr. Murphy chaired the VA secretary’s Mental Health Task Force and led the Veterans Health Administration’s Action Agenda: Achieving the Promise—Transforming VA Mental Health- care. From 1983 to 1987, Dr. Murphy served in the U.S. Air Force as the staff neurologist at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, and on the faculty of the USUHS. She is board certified in neurology and earned her M.D. from the Georgetown University School of Medicine and her M.P.H. from the USUHS. She currently serves on the IOM’s Committee on the Readjust- ment Needs of Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families: Phase 2, and has been appointed to serve as a member of the BSP and the National Academy’s Institutional Review Board. J. Marc Overhage, M.D., Ph.D., is the chief medical informatics officer for Siemens Health Services. Prior to joining Siemens, he was the founding chief executive officer of the Indiana Health Information Exchange (IHIE) and was director of medical informatics at the Regenstrief Institute, Inc., and a Sam Regenstrief Professor of Medical Informatics at the Indiana Univer- sity School of Medicine. He has spent more than 25 years developing and implementing scientific and clinical systems and evaluating their value. With his colleagues from the Regenstrief Institute, he created a community-wide electronic medical record (called the Indiana Network for Patient Care) containing data from many sources, including laboratories, pharmacies, and hospitals in central Indiana. The system currently connects a majority of acute care hospitals in central Indiana and includes inpatient and out- patient encounter data, laboratory results, immunization data, and other selected data. In order to create a sustainable financial model, Dr. Overhage helped create the IHIE, a not-for-profit corporation. In addition, he has developed and evaluated clinical decision support, including inpatient and outpatient computerized physician order entry and the underlying knowl- edge bases to support them. He practiced general internal medicine for more than 20 years, including in the ambulatory, inpatient, and emergency care settings. Over the last decade, Dr. Overhage has played a significant regional and national leadership role in advancing the policy, standards, financing, and implementation of health information exchange. He serves on the National Committee for Vital and Health Statistics and the Health Information Technology Standards Committee, as well as serving on the board of directors of the NQF and being engaged in a number of national health care initiatives. Dr. Overhage is a member of the IOM and a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics and the American College of Physicians. He received the Davies Recognition Award for Excellence in

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APPENDIX A 189 Computer-Based Patient Recognition for the Regenstrief Medical Record System. Dr. Overhage received his B.A., with high honors, in physics from Wabash College and his Ph.D. in biophysics and his M.D. from the Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Overhage was a resident in internal medicine, a medical informatics and health services research fellow, and then chief medical resident at the Indiana University School of Medicine. Susanne Tropez-Sims, M.D., M.P.H., is associate dean of clinical affilia- tions and professor of pediatrics at Meharry Medical College, and adjunct professor of pediatrics at the Vanderbilt School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee. She directs the Adolescent Clinic at Meharry. She specializes in general pediatric care, adolescent medicine, and child abuse. She directed an HIV/AIDS prevention program entitled MINDS (Moving in New Direc- tions) in two public schools in Davidson County for 5 years. She joined the faculty at the Louisiana State University Medical Center in 1988 as the director of the pediatric emergency room and, in 1989, she became the divi- sion chief of the ambulatory division. During this period, Dr. Tropez-Sims was also the maternal and child health director for the New Orleans Health Department. Under her leadership, the Child Abuse Program became more organized and became an integral part of the pediatric residency and the emergency residency training. She received an award from the state of Louisiana Council for Child Abuse for her contribution in this area. Dr. Tropez-Sims was instrumental in improving and ensuring the medical ser- vices for two school-based clinics (G.W. Carver Junior/Senior High School and Booker T. Washington Junior/Senior High School) in New Orleans. In 1982, she joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and served as director of the Outpatient Pediatric Clinic for the Wake Area Health Education Center. She was a child medical examiner for North Carolina, training physicians, police, social workers, and lawyers across the state in the evaluation of child abuse. In 1997, she received the first na- tional American Academy of Pediatrics Martin Ushkow Community Service Award for her work in school health. Dr. Tropez-Sims is a graduate of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, where she received her M.D. and M.P.H. in maternal and child health. She was the second minority to complete her internship and residence in pediatrics at the North Carolina Memorial Hospital in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Carolyn (Cindy) Watts, Ph.D., became professor and chair of the Depart- ment of Health Administration at the Virginia Commonwealth University in August 2010. Prior to this appointment, she was a professor in the Department of Health Services at the University of Washington, where she held adjunct appointments in the Department of Economics and the Evans School of Public Affairs. She served as the director of the health

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190 LOVELL FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER MERGER policy analysis and the process track of the M.P.H. program; as a director of the extended M.P.H. program in health services; and as a core faculty member of the Institute for Public Health Genetics. Her research work has focused on organizational, reimbursement, and regulatory issues in health care markets, and health care industry structure and incentives. An ac- complished scholar, her work is widely published in academic literature. In addition to her academic appointments, Dr. Watts has worked extensively with numerous provider and policy organizations. She was a board member of the Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, chaired the 2006 Wash- ington State Certificate of Need Program Task Force, was director of the Washington Health Legislative Conference, and has been a consultant to the Washington State Hospital Association. Dr. Watts received her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political economics from the Johns Hopkins University. CONSULTANTS David K. Barnes is the head of Advanced Policy Solutions, Bethesda, Maryland. Mr. Barnes is the former director of the Social Security Ad- ministration’s (SSA’s) Office of Disability Evaluation Policy. At the SSA, he oversaw development, implementation, and analysis of disability decision- making policy for both the Social Security Disability Insurance and the Supplemental Security Income disability programs. In his 27-year career, Mr. Barnes developed a reputation not only as a preeminent authority on disability policy and decision making but also as a respected expert in research and development, personnel management, team building, procure- ment, rule making, and litigation. Thomas A. D’Aunno, Ph.D., is the executive vice dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. His research focuses on the organization and management of health care services. He has a particular interest in leadership, organizational change, and performance improve- ment, and has examined these issues in a variety of national studies of health care organizations that have been funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Pew Memorial Trust. Dr. D’Aunno was previously a faculty member at the University of Chicago, the University of Michigan, and, most recently, at INSEAD, where he held the Novartis Chair in Healthcare Management. He has published articles in leading management and health journals, includ- ing the Administrative Science Quarterly, the Academy of Management Journal, the Academy of Management Review, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. Dr. D’Aunno has been a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including the Administrative Science Quarterly, the Journal of Health and

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APPENDIX A 191 Social Behavior, and the Academy of Management Review. In addition, he has consulted and taught executive education courses on several topics, including leadership, performance management, high-performance teams, organizational design, and organizational change. Dr. D’Aunno is a past chairman of the Academy of Management Division of Health Care Man- agement and a recipient of that division’s award for career distinguished service. PRINCIPAL STAFF Frederick (Rick) Erdtmann, M.D., M.P.H., is currently the director of the BSP and the Medical Follow-up Agency at the IOM. Prior to joining the IOM, he was a career military physician in the U.S. Army. While in the mili- tary, he served as chief of several large departments of preventive medicine at U.S. and overseas installations. He also was commander of the military community hospital at Ft. Carson, Colorado, and later served as hospital commander for the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Dr. Erdtmann had several assignments at the Army Surgeon General’s Office, where he worked on military health care policies. He received his undergraduate degree from Bucknell University and an M.P.H. degree from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a graduate of Temple University’s Medical School and is board certified in the specialty of preventive medicine. The board that Dr. Erdtmann directs was responsible for managing a major study involving the disability decision process for the SSA and two other disability-related studies for the Veterans Administration in the recent past. Michael McGeary is a senior program officer at the BSP, serving concur- rently as the director of the Committee on Evaluation of the Lovell Federal Health Care Center Merger and the Committee of Medical Experts to As- sist Social Security on Disability Issues. He recently served as the director of the Committee on Social Security Cardiovascular Disability Criteria. He is a political scientist specializing in health, science, and technology policy analysis and program evaluation. Before 2004, he was an independent con- sultant to government agencies, foundations, and nonprofit organizations in issues of science and technology. Between 1981 and 1995, Mr. McGeary was at the IOM and the National Academy of Sciences, where he was staff director of more than a dozen major reports on such topics as federal fund- ing of research and development; graduate education and employment of scientists and engineers; and priority setting, funding, and management of the NIH. From 2004 to 2007, he was staff director for the IOM committees that recommended improvements in the systems for determining disability of the SSA and the VA, respectively. Mr. McGeary is a graduate of Harvard

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192 LOVELL FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER MERGER College and completed all requirements for a doctorate in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology except the dissertation. Susan R. McCutchen is a senior program associate at the BSP supporting the work of the Committee on Evaluation of the Lovell Federal Health Care Center Merger and the Committee of Medical Experts to Assist Social Se- curity on Disability Issues. She has been on staff at the National Academies for more than 30 years and has worked in several institutional divisions and with many different boards, committees, and panels within those units. The studies in which she has participated have addressed a broad range of subjects and focused on a variety of issues, including science and technol- ogy for international development, technology transfer, aeronautics and the U.S. space program, natural disaster mitigation, U.S. education policy and science curricula, needle exchange for the prevention of HIV transmission, the scientific merit of the polygraph, human factors/engineering, research ethics, disability compensation programs, health hazard evaluation, and medical and public health preparedness for catastrophic events, including nuclear detonations. She has assisted in the production of more than 50 publications and was an editor for A 21st Century System for Evaluating Veterans for Disability Benefits and Assessing Medical Preparedness to Respond to a Terrorist Nuclear Event: Workshop Report. Ms. McCutchen has a B.A. in French, with minors in Italian and Spanish, from Ohio’s Mi- ami University, and an M.A. in French, with a minor in English, from Kent State University. LaVita Sullivan is a senior program assistant with the BSP supporting the work of the Committee on Evaluation of the Lovell Federal Health Care Center Merger and the Committee of Medical Experts to Assist Social Se- curity on Disability Issues. Prior to joining the National Academies in 2008, Ms. Sullivan spent 5 progressive years with the DoD, where she served as a program analyst and contributed to the streamlining of administrative processes and procedures. She is a certified event planner and is currently pursuing her undergraduate degree in communications at the University of Maryland University College.