Appendix D


Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Russell R. Pate, Ph.D. (Chair), is professor of exercise science at the Norman J. Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia. Dr. Pate’s research interests and expertise focus on physical activity measurement, determinants, and promotion in children and youth. He also directs a national postgraduate course aimed at developing research competencies related to physical activity and public health. Dr. Pate is involved in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–funded Prevention Research Center at the University of South Carolina. His research includes studies on preschoolers’ physical activity levels and how schools can influence these levels, as well as multicenter trials on the promotion of physical activity among middle and high school-age girls. Dr. Pate was a member of the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and served on the 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. He is a past president of both the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Coalition on Promoting Physical Activity. Dr. Pate served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth and Committee on Progress in Preventing Obesity in Children and Youth, and is a current member of the Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention. He received a B.S. in physical education from Springfield College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in exercise physiology from the University of Oregon.



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Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Russell R. Pate, Ph.D. (Chair), is professor of exercise science at the Norman J. Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Caro- lina, Columbia. Dr. Pate's research interests and expertise focus on physi- cal activity measurement, determinants, and promotion in children and youth. He also directs a national postgraduate course aimed at develop- ing research competencies related to physical activity and public health. Dr. Pate is involved in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded Prevention Research Center at the University of South Carolina. His research includes studies on preschoolers' physical activity levels and how schools can influence these levels, as well as multicenter trials on the promotion of physical activity among middle and high school-age girls. Dr. Pate was a member of the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Commit- tee of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and served on the 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. He is a past president of both the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Coali- tion on Promoting Physical Activity. Dr. Pate served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth and Committee on Progress in Preventing Obesity in Children and Youth, and is a current member of the Standing Committee on Child- hood Obesity Prevention. He received a B.S. in physical education from Springfield College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in exercise physiology from the University of Oregon. 253

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254 FITNESS MEASURES AND HEALTH OUTCOMES IN YOUTH Cameron Blimkie, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. He is a specialist in pediatric exercise physiology, known internationally for his expertise in the neu- romuscular and musculoskeletal adaptations of children to exercise. He recently completed a 6-year term as director of the Graduate Program in Kinesiology. Dr. Blimkie is former foundation chair of pediatric exercise science research at the New Children's Hospital in Sydney, Australia, and has held invited visiting professorships at the Catholic University of Leu- ven, Belgium, and the Department of Pediatrics, the University Hospital of Geneva, Switzerland. He is a former vice president of the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology and served as a consultant to the Swiss Musculo- Skeletal Health Research Program. Dr. Blimkie has also been a member of the editorial board of the journal Pediatric Exercise Science for the past 20 years and is a longtime fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). He was an invited contributor to the Clinical Guidelines on Osteo- porosis issued by the Osteoporosis Society of Canada, to the Bone Health section of the recent Guidelines for Youth Physical Activity sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and to a recent consensus statement on Training Considerations for Young Athletes sponsored by the International Olympic Committee Medical Commission. Dr. Blimkie's research spans a spectrum of special clinical populations, including children with obesity, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis, as well as normal healthy children and elite young athletes. He received his B.A. in combined arts and physical education from McMaster University and his M.A. in physical education and Ph.D. in medical physiology from the University of Western Ontario. Darla Castelli, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Kinesi- ology and Health Education at the University of Texas at Austin. Formerly a health and physical education teacher, she is a past president of the Maine Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AHPERD) and a 1995 teacher of the year. From a pedagogical perspec- tive, Dr. Castelli studies the effects of physical activity and metabolic risk factors on cognitive performance in school-aged children. She has presented her work at congressional briefings in Washington, DC, in support of the Fit Kids Act. For her role in this research, she was named a 2006 young scholar by the International Association of Physical Education in Higher Education and a past-president's scholar by the 2007 Illinois Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. Dr. Castelli has pub- lished in Preventive Medicine, Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise, Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, and Developmental Psychol- ogy. Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Dietetic Association, and the U.S. Department of Education. She

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APPENDIX D 255 obtained her M.S. from Northern Illinois University and her Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina. Charles B. Corbin, Ph.D., is professor emeritus in the Department of Exercise and Wellness at Arizona State University. Dr. Corbin has published more than 200 professional, research, and popular articles and 90 books on fitness and wellness. He is a fellow emeritus and former president of the National Academy of Kinesiology. Among his awards are the Healthy American Fit- ness Leaders Award of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports (PCPFS, now President's Council on Physical Fitness, Sports and Nutrition [PCFSN]) and National Jaycees; the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) Honor Award; the Physi- cal Fitness Council Honor Award; the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) Hall of Fame; ACSM Cureton Lecturer; the Dis- tinguished Service Award of the President's Council; and the Gulick Award (AAHPERD). He is a lifetime member of AAHPERD and a longtime member and fellow in ACSM. Dr. Corbin was named alliance scholar by AAHPERD and distinguished scholar by the National Association of Kinesiology and Physical Education in Higher Education (NAKPEHE). He served as editor of several periodicals, including Quest and the PCFSN Research Digest. He was the first chair of the Scientific Board of the PCFSN. He was named as a distin- guished alumnus by the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health at the University of Illinois and was honored as centennial scholar by the University of New Mexico at the university's 100th anniversary. Dr. Corbin received his B.S. from the University of New Mexico, his M.S. from the Uni- versity of Illinois, and his Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico. Stephen R. Daniels, M.D., Ph.D., is professor and chair of the Depart- ment of Pediatrics at University of Colorado School of Medicine. He is also pediatrician-in-chief and L. Joseph Butterfield chair in pediatrics at The Children's Hospital. Dr. Daniels held numerous academic and clinical appointments at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and the Cincinnati Children's Hospital before joining the University of Colorado School of Medicine and The Children's Hospital. His area of expertise is preventive cardiology, and he has a longtime interest in the application of sophisticated epidemiologic and biostatistical methods to pediatric clinical research problems. The role of lifestyle factors, such as diet and physical activity, is central to many of his studies. Dr. Daniels has received numer- ous awards and honors throughout his career. He has been an active par- ticipant and leader in many national investigative committees and study sections, including the American Academy of Pediatrics' Committee on Nutrition; the American Heart Association's Council for Cardiovascular

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256 FITNESS MEASURES AND HEALTH OUTCOMES IN YOUTH Disease in the Young; and the International Pediatric Hypertension Associa- tion's executive board, which he recently chaired. He has also served as a frequent participant in grant review study sections and science panels of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Daniels has served as associate editor for the Journal of Pediatrics since 1995. He is a peer reviewer for many other journals and is widely published in the medical literature. He is co-author of Medical Epidemiology, an introductory textbook for medical students, and co-author and editor of the book Pediatric Prevention of Atheroscle- rotic Cardiovascular Disease, published in 2006. He earned his M.D. from the University of Chicago in 1977, his M.P.H. from Harvard University in 1979, and his Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of North Caro- lina in 1989. He completed his residency in pediatrics and his fellowship in pediatric cardiology at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in 1981 and 1984, respectively. Harold W. Kohl III, Ph.D., is professor in the School of Public Health and Michael and Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living at the University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston, and professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education at the University of Texas-Austin. Dr. Kohl is founder and director of the University of Texas Physical Activ- ity Epidemiology Program, where he is responsible for student training, research, and community service related to physical activity and public health. Dr. Kohl presently is co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Physical Activity and Health. His previous service includes directing physical activity epidemiology and surveillance projects in the Division of Nutrition, Physi- cal Activity, and Obesity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Kohl's research focuses on the specific area of epidemiology related to physical inactivity and obesity, in adults but also in children. He has researched the development of a system for measuring the effectiveness of state physical education policies in schools, as well as historical changes in physical activity. Dr. Kohl also studies the effect of the built environment on physical activity and is currently researching a planned development that implements "smart growth" techniques that support physically active lifestyles. He received an M.S.P.H. from the University of South Carolina School of Public Health in epidemiology and biostatistics and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston School of Public Health in community health studies. Robert M. Malina, Ph.D., is professor emeritus in the Department of Kine- siology and Health Education at the University of Texas at Austin and an adjunct research professor in the Department of Kinesiology at Tarleton State University. Dr. Malina is also a visiting professor at the Research Insti- tute for Sport and Exercise Sciences at Liverpool John Moores University in

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APPENDIX D 257 the United Kingdom and at the University School of Physical Education in Wroclaw, Poland. He has extensive research experience in the field of physi- cal growth and maturation of children and youth and has published about 700 articles and book chapters. He has received many honors, including the Alliance Scholar Award from AAHPERD, the Citation Award from ACSM, the Honor Award from the North American Society for Pediatric Exercise Medicine, the Distinguished Scholar Award from the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity, the Hetherington Award from the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education, and the Franz Boas Distinguished Achievement Award from the Human Biology Association. He is a foreign member of the Polish Academy of Sci- ences (Division II, Biological Sciences) and a member of many professional organizations, including AAHPERD, ACSM, the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, the Society for the Study of Human Biology, the Human Biology Association, the European Anthropological Association, the Society for Research in Child Development, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education, and the International Association of Sport Kinetics. He also serves on the editorial board of numerous journals, including Annals of Human Biology; Journal of Sports Sciences; Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine; Pediatric Exercise Science; Ovidius University Annals, Series Physical Education and Sport; Italian Journal of Sport Sciences; Interna- tional Journal of Sport and Health Science; and Indian Journal of Sport Sciences. Dr. Malina earned a Ph.D. in physical education from the Univer- sity of Wisconsin, Madison in 1963 and a second Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968. He was awarded honorary doctorates from Catholic University (Belgium) in 1989, University School of Physical Education in Cracow (Poland) in 2001, University School of Physical Education in Wroclaw (Poland) in 2006, and University of Coim- bra (Portugal) in 2008. Jennifer Sacheck, Ph.D., is associate professor of nutrition in the John Hancock Research Center on Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Pre- vention at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy and a sci- entist in the Antioxidants Research Laboratory at the Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. She is an active member of ACSM and the Obesity Society. Dr. Sacheck's research exper- tise lies at the intersection of diet, physical activity, and health. Past and current studies in youth have involved biological, anthropometric, dietary, physical activity, and fitness measurements in both school and community settings. Currently, she is examining the impact of school-based physical fitness results and obesity on cardiovascular disease risk factors in urban schoolchildren and the relationship between changes in school-based fitness

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258 FITNESS MEASURES AND HEALTH OUTCOMES IN YOUTH and the remission of overweight/obesity. Dr. Sacheck has authored reports on the childhood obesity epidemic in New England for the Massachusetts Health Policy Forum and the Harvard Pilgrim Healthcare Foundation and has also led several evaluations of community-based programs that target disadvantaged overweight/obese youth. She received her B.S. in biology from Syracuse University; her M.S. in exercise science from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; and her Ph.D. in nutritional science from Tufts University. She completed her postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School. David Stodden, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences at Texas Tech University. Prior to his current position, he was an assistant professor in the School of Human Move- ment, Sport, and Leisure Studies at Bowling Green State University and a consultant and strength and conditioning coach for the Cleveland Indians organization. His research focuses on promoting the acquisition of funda- mental motor skills and on the association of motor skill competence with physical activity, health-related physical fitness, perceived competence, and obesity across the life span. Dr. Stodden is a member of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity, A AHPERD, and the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). He is serving as academic support on a committee for the National Physical Activity Plan, Education Sector. He also is a certified strength and conditioning specialist (NSCA). Dr. Stodden received his B.S. in biology from Buena Vista Univer- sity, his M.S. in exercise and sport science from Iowa State University, and his Ph.D. in motor behavior from Auburn University. Melicia Whitt-Glover, Ph.D., is president and chief executive officer of Gramercy Research Group, LLC. She is also adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science at the University of Kansas, adjunct faculty member in the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and adjunct associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention at Wake Forest University Health Sciences. She serves as a reviewer for journals that include American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Ethnicity and Disease, International Journal of Obesity, Journal of Physical Activity and Health, Medicine and Science in Sports & Exercise, Research Quarterly for Exercise & Sport, and Sports Medicine. Dr. Whitt-Glover serves on the editorial board of American Journal of Health Behavior and as a member of the African American Collaborative Obesity Research Network, ACSM, and the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. Her honors and awards include an ACSM fellowship and an African Ameri-

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APPENDIX D 259 can Professors Program fellowship from the University of South Carolina. Dr. Whitt-Glover received her B.A. and M.A. in exercise physiology from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of South Carolina. Weimo Zhu, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Com- munity Health, College of Applied Health Sciences, at the University of Illi- nois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He is a member of several professional organizations, including AAHPERD, the American Educational Research Association, the Rasch Measurement Special Interest Group, the American Educational Research Association, the National Council on Measurement in Education, ACSM, and the American Statistical Association. He serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including International Journal of Applied Sport Science, Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, Journal of Applied Measurement, Journal of Physical Activity and Health, and International Education. Honors and awards received by Dr. Zhu include an American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Educa- tion fellowship; membership on the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports Science Board; faculty fellow at the Academy for Entrepre- neurial Leadership, UIUC; Outstanding Leadership ACSM-UIUC Walking for Health Specialty Conference: October 13-15, 2005, from ACSM; and the Measurement Honor Award from the Measurement and Evaluation Council, AAHPERD. Dr. Zhu received his B.S. in physical education from Nanjing Normal University, China; his M.S. in exercise physiology from Shanghai Institute of Physical Education, China; and his Ph.D. in physical education from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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