B

Speaker Biographies

Erin Abu-Rish, M.A., is a nurse with a background in community health, public and social policy, and interprofessional education (IPE). She is currently a fourth-year Ph.D. student at the University of Washington (UW) School of Nursing, where she is a National Institutes of Health–funded trainee in the Multidisciplinary Predoctoral Clinical Research Training Program of UW’s Institute of Translational Health Sciences. For her dissertation research, Ms. Abu-Rish is collaborating with the Public Health Activities and Services Tracking Study to focus on exploring relationships among the recent economic downturn, public health budget cuts at the local health department level, and individual-level maternal and child health outcomes and disparities. Since 2009 she has worked as a graduate research assistant on IPE training grants. She also helped to establish the UW Health Science Students Institute for Healthcare Improvement Open School Chapter.

Mohammed Ali, M.B.Ch.B., M.Sc., M.B.A., is an assistant professor of global health at Emory University and IPA consultant for the Division of Diabetes Translation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He is a co-investigator for three studies in India: a large surveillance study, a case-control study investigating early onset diabetes, and a translation trial of comprehensive care for people with diabetes. He is a working group member for a quality of life and costs of care assessment (the ACCORD study). He also co-leads the expert group on diabetes complications for the Global Burden of Disease Study. At the CDC, Dr. Ali helps manage a collaborative network of investigators (the NEXT-D Study) that evaluates the effects of different policy changes on diabetes prevention and



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B Speaker Biographies Erin Abu-Rish, M.A., is a nurse with a background in community health, public and social policy, and interprofessional education (IPE). She is cur- rently a fourth-year Ph.D. student at the University of Washington (UW) School of Nursing, where she is a National Institutes of Health–funded trainee in the Multidisciplinary Predoctoral Clinical Research Training Program of UW’s Institute of Translational Health Sciences. For her disser- tation research, Ms. Abu-Rish is collaborating with the Public Health Activ- ities and Services Tracking Study to focus on exploring relationships among the recent economic downturn, public health budget cuts at the local health department level, and individual-level maternal and child health outcomes and disparities. Since 2009 she has worked as a graduate research assistant on IPE training grants. She also helped to establish the UW Health Science Students Institute for Healthcare Improvement Open School Chapter. Mohammed Ali, M.B.Ch.B., M.Sc., M.B.A., is an assistant professor of global health at Emory University and IPA consultant for the Division of Diabetes Translation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He is a co-investigator for three studies in India: a large surveil- lance study, a case-control study investigating early onset diabetes, and a translation trial of comprehensive care for people with diabetes. He is a working group member for a quality of life and costs of care assessment (the ACCORD study). He also co-leads the expert group on diabetes com- plications for the Global Burden of Disease Study. At the CDC, Dr. Ali helps manage a collaborative network of investigators (the NEXT-D Study) that evaluates the effects of different policy changes on diabetes prevention and 109

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110 INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR COLLABORATION control and that provides scientific advice for the National Diabetes Preven- tion Program. He also works actively with Emory’s Global Health Institute as a senior fellow and directs the institute’s signature Global Health Case Competition. Gillian Barclay, D.D.S., Dr.P.H., is vice president of programs of the Aetna Foundation. In her role she leads the development, execution, and evalua- tion of the foundation’s national grant programs and cultivates new proj- ects within its three focus areas: reducing obesity, improving health care equity, and promoting integrated health care. As part of her responsibilities, she also is a frequent spokesperson for the foundation, presenting its work and the accomplishments of grantees to internal and external constituents. Prior to joining the Aetna Foundation, Dr. Barclay was an advisor for the regional office of the World Health Organization in the Office of Carib- bean Program Coordination. In that position she managed a portfolio of health initiatives in the region that focused special attention on the impact of gender, human rights, integrated health systems, and essential public health functions on access to quality health care. Previously she was the evaluation manager of health programs for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, responsible for assessing the foundation’s health initiatives in the areas of reducing health disparities, community- and school-based health care, and oral health, among others. Hugh Barr, M.Phil., Ph.D., is president of the U.K. Centre for the Advance- ment of Interprofessional Education and emeritus editor of the Journal of Interprofessional Care. He was awarded his Ph.D. by the University of Greenwich based on his interprofessional publications and honorary doctorates by East Anglia and Southampton universities and honorary fellowship from the University of Westminster for his role in promoting interprofessional education (IPE) nationally and internationally. His pub- lications in that field include surveys, practice guidelines, and systematic reviews. He served on the World Health Organization study group on IPE and collaborative practice. His background is in probation, prison after- care, criminology, and social work education. Geraldine “Polly” Bednash, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, was appointed executive director of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in 1989. Prior to serving as executive director and chief executive officer, Dr. Bednash headed the association’s legislative and regulatory advocacy pro- grams as director of government affairs. In that post from 1986 to 1989, she directed AACN’s efforts to secure strong federal support for nursing education and research, coordinated new initiatives with federal agencies and with major foundations, and coauthored AACN’s landmark study of

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APPENDIX B 111 the financial costs to students and to clinical agencies of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education. Dr. Bednash currently serves as chair of the Nursing Alliance for Quality Care, as a member of the Sullivan Alliance to Transform the Health Professions, and as a member of the Quality Alliance Steering Committee. Additionally, she has been appointed to the Secretary’s Academic Affiliations Council of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Barbara F. Brandt, Ph.D., has served as the associate vice president for education and as a professor of pharmaceutical care and health systems at the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center since 2000. She has served as the principal investigator and director of the Minnesota Area Health Education Center statewide network, an interprofessional work- force development program for rural and urban underserved in Minnesota. Dr. Brandt is responsible for implementing the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center 1Health initiative in interprofessional education in allied health, dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, public health, and veterinary medicine. Valentina Brashers, M.D., is professor of nursing, Woodard Clinical Scholar, and attending physician in internal medicine at the University of Virginia (UVA). After completing her residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in pulmonary disease, she practiced in a rural general medical clinic and in the UVA emergency room. She is a founding member of the UVA School of Medicine Academy of Distinguished Educators and is the first physician to be elected as an honorary member of the UVA Nursing Alumni Association. She is the first professor to win the UVA All University Outstanding Teaching Award twice, and she has received the Excellence in Teaching Award from both the UVA School of Nursing and the UVA School of Medicine. Dr. Brashers is the founder and co-chair of the UVA Inter- professional Education Initiative, which provides leadership and oversight to more than 25 interprofessional education experiences for students and faculty at all levels of training. Steven W. Chen, Pharm.D., is an associate professor at the University of Southern California (USC) School of Pharmacy and a licensed pharmacist. Dr. Chen holds the Hygeia Centennial Chair in Clinical Pharmacy at USC for his work and leadership in improving medication use and safety in the community through clinical pharmacy services in safety net clinics. In addition, he has received several national awards for his work to improve medication use and safety in uninsured, vulnerable populations receiving care in federally qualified health centers and safety net clinics in the Los Angeles community as well as at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

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112 INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR COLLABORATION Marilyn Chow, R.N., D.N.Sc., is the vice president of national patient care services at Kaiser Permanente, where she works with nursing leaders and senior executives across all regions and collaborates with internal and exter- nal partners to enable the delivery of the highest quality and safest patient- centered care. Her career has focused on promoting the role of nurses in primary care, advanced practice, and hospital-based care. Dr. Chow is committed to incorporating innovation and technology to reduce waste and improve workflows within the health care industry. She was the driv- ing force in conceptualizing and creating the Garfield Innovation Center, Kaiser Permanente’s living laboratory, where ideas are tested and solutions are developed in a hands-on, simulated clinical environment. David N. Collier, M.D., Ph.D., is an associate professor of pediatrics and adjunct associate professor of family medicine and kinesiology at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University (ECU). He is also director of ECU’s Pediatric Healthy Weight Research and Treatment Center, an as- sociate director for the East Carolina Diabetes and Obesity Institute, and vice chair for research for the Department of Pediatrics. His clinical and re- search interests are focused on understanding the causes and consequences of childhood obesity. Malcolm Cox, M.D., is the chief academic affiliations officer for the Veter- ans Administration (VA), where he oversees the largest health professions education program in the United States. Previously he was chief of medicine at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center, associate dean for clinical educa- tion at the University of Pennsylvania, and dean for medical education at Harvard Medical School. During the past 5 years, Dr. Cox has led a major expansion of the VA’s medical, nursing, and associated health training pro- grams and an intensive reevaluation of the VA’s educational infrastructure and affiliation relationships. At the same time he has repositioned the Office of Academic Affiliations as a major voice in health professions workforce reform and educational innovation. Dr. Cox currently serves on the Strate- gic Directions Committee of the National Leadership Council of the Veter- ans Health Administration, the National Advisory Committee of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, the National Board of Medical Examiners, and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Jan De Maeseneer, M.D., Ph.D., has been working as a family physician in the community health center Botermarkt in Ledeberg, a deprived area in the city of Ghent, Belgium. Since 2008 he has served as vice dean for stra- tegic planning on the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. He is board member of the Interuniversity Flemish Consortium for vocational training of family medicine, and he chairs the working party for family medicine

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APPENDIX B 113 of the Belgian High Council for medical specialists and family physicians. Professor De Maeseneer chairs the Educational Committee (since 1997) and directs a fundamental reform of the undergraduate curriculum (from a discipline-based to an integrated patient-based approach). In 2004 Profes- sor De Maeseneer received the WONCA-Award for Excellence in Health Care: The Five-Star Doctor at the 17th World Conference of Family Doc- tors in Orlando, Florida. In 2008 he received a Doctor Honoris Causa degree at the Universidad Mayor de San Simon in Cochabamba, Bolivia. In 2010 he received the prize De Schaepdrijver-Caenepeel for developmental work from the Royal Flemish Academy of Medicine. Marietjie de Villiers, Ph.D., M.B.Ch.B., M.Fam.Med., is deputy dean of education at the Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS) of Stellenbosch Univer- sity in South Africa, where she is also a professor in family medicine and primary care. She is currently responsible for all curriculum development, educational innovation, program implementation, and quality assurance on undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing education levels at the FHS. Professor de Villiers is chairperson of the Stellenbosch University Rural Medical Education Partnership Advisory Committee and is actively involved in the implementation and evaluation of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative. Carla Dyer, M.D., associate clinical professor of internal medicine and child health, is a Med-Peds hospitalist physician and clerkship director for the department of internal medicine at the University of Missouri. She directs the Introduction to Patient Care courses for the University of Missouri School of Medicine students. She chairs the Interprofessional Curriculum in Quality and Safety steering committee and led the development of an interprofessional simulation focused on patient safety. She collaborates with School of Nursing and School of Pharmacy faculty to develop and integrate interprofessional learning opportunities for health professional students. Her research interests include interprofessional education, patient safety, quality improvement education for health professional students, and simulation. Mark Earnest, M.D., Ph.D., is a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus, where he teaches and practices internal medicine. Dr. Earnest is the director of interprofessional education at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, where he oversees the REACH Program (Realizing Educational Advancement in Collaborative Health). REACH involves students from all the health profession programs on campus in a longitudinal curriculum designed to improve quality and safety of care through more effective interprofessional collaboration and

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114 INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR COLLABORATION teamwork. The program is funded by grants from the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation and the Colorado Health Foundation. Dr. Earnest serves on the board of the American Interprofessional Health Collaborative and also founded and directs the LEADS track (Leadership Education Advocacy Development Scholarship)—a track within the school of medicine that develops leadership skills with an emphasis on service to the community and civic engagement. Thomas W. Feeley, M.D., is the Helen Shafer Fly Distinguished Professor of Anesthesiology and head of the Division of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. He has led MD Anderson’s Institute for Cancer Care Excellence since its formation in 2008. The Institute for Cancer Care Excellence focuses on research to improve the value of cancer care delivery through programs that measure outcomes and costs of cancer care delivery. Dr. Feeley currently serves on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population. Dawn Forman, Ph.D., M.B.A., is currently professor of interprofessional education and clinical director at Curtin University, Perth, Australia. She uses her coaching skills as a leader and manager within the organization and with key stakeholders to facilitate change and new ways of working. Dr. Forman is internationally recognized in her field and widely published. In addition to her work at Curtin University. Dr. Forman is currently visit- ing professor at the University of Chichester (U.K.) and adjunct professor at Auckland University of Technology (New Zealand). Martha (Meg) Gaines, J.D., L.L.M., is the associate dean for academic af- fairs and experiential learning at the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she has served as a clinical professor of law for 25 years. She is also founding director of the interdisciplinary Center for Patient Partnerships, which trains future professionals in medicine, nursing, law, health systems, industrial engineering, pharmacy, genetic counseling, and other disciplines who provide advocacy services to patients with life-threatening and serious chronic illnesses. Ms. Gaines teaches courses related to consumer issues in health care advocacy to graduate students pursuing various health profes- sions and law. Following her graduation from law school, she served as a law clerk to the late Hon. Thomas Tang, 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and as a trial attorney for the Wisconsin State Public Defender. Rosemary Gibson, M.Sc., is a national leader in health care quality and safety and a section editor of the Archives of Internal Medicine’s “Less is More” series. She is principal author of the new book The Battle Over

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APPENDIX B 115 Health Care: What Obama’s Health Care Reform Means for America’s Future, a non-partisan analysis of the future state of health care and its impact on the economy. Ms. Gibson led national health care quality and safety initiatives at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for 16 years. She was the chief architect of the foundation’s decade-long strategy to establish palliative care in the mainstream of the U.S. health care system. Ms. Gibson is the author of the critically acclaimed book Wall of Silence, which tells the human story behind the Institute of Medicine report To Err Is Human, and The Treatment Trap, a book on the overuse of medical care. She is a graduate of Georgetown University and has a master’s degree from the London School of Economics. Paul Grundy, M.D., M.P.H., FACOEM, FACPM, is one of only 38 IBM employees and the only physician selected into IBM’s senior industry lead- ership forum, known as the IBM Industry Academy. Prior to joining IBM, Dr. Grundy worked as a senior diplomat in the U.S. Department of State supporting the intersection of health and diplomacy. He was also medical director for the International SOS, the world’s largest medical assistance company, and for Adventist Health Systems, the second largest not-for- profit medical system in the world. Dr. Grundy is the president of the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative and is an adjunct professor at the University of Utah’s Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. He was made an honorary member of the American Academy of Family and has won three Department of State superior honor awards and four Department of State meritorious service awards. Dennis K. Helling, Pharm.D., D.Sc., is executive director of pharmacy operations and therapeutics at Kaiser Permanente, Denver. His department employs more than 900 staff at its 37 pharmacies, emphasizing expanded roles for pharmacists and ambulatory clinical services. Dr. Helling’s depart- ment is recognized nationally and internationally for innovative pharmacy services in managed care. He is a clinical professor at the University of Colorado School of Pharmacy and has been elected fellow of the American College of Clinical Pharmacology (ACCP) and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Dr. Helling was a founding member and presi- dent of ACCP and president of the American Council for Pharmacy Educa- tion. During his 19 years in academia Dr. Helling was the associate dean for clinical affairs and professor and chair in the Department of Pharmacy Practice at the University of Houston and associate professor and head in the Division of Clinical/Hospital Pharmacy at the University of Iowa. Dr. Helling currently serves as vice president of the Denver Hospice board of directors and is immediate past president of the American Pharmacists As- sociation Foundation. His practice emphasis and research have focused on

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116 INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR COLLABORATION documenting the impact pharmacists have on improving patient outcomes and the costs of health care. Eric Holmboe, M.D., a board-certified internist, is chief medical officer and senior vice president of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and the ABIM Foundation. He is also professor adjunct of medicine at Yale University and adjunct professor at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Previously he was associate program director of the Yale Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program and director of Student Clinical Assessment at the Yale School of Medicine. Before joining Yale he was division chief of General Internal Medicine at the National Na- val Medical Center. His research interests include interventions to improve quality of care and methods in the evaluation of clinical competence. Dr. Holmboe is a member of the National Board of Medical Examiners and Medbiquitous and is a consultant for the Drug Safety and Risk Manage- ment Subcommittee of the Pharmaceutical Science Advisory Committee for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Physi- cians in London. Pamela R. Jeffries, Ph.D., R.N., A.N.E.F., FAAN, is the associate dean of academic affairs at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. She has more than 25 years of teaching experience in the classroom, learning laboratory, and clinical setting with undergraduate nursing students. Dr. Jeffries has been awarded several teaching awards, including the National League for Nurs- ing (NLN) Lucile Petry Leone Award for nursing education, the Elizabeth Russell Belford Award for teaching excellence given by Sigma Theta Tau, and numerous outstanding faculty awards presented by the graduating nursing classes. Dr. Jeffries was named project director of the 3-year NLN/ Laerdal Simulation Study, a national multisite research project. Craig A. Jones, M.D., is director of the Vermont Blueprint for Health, a program established by the state of Vermont under the leadership of its governor, legislature, and the bipartisan Health Care Reform Commis- sion. The Blueprint is intended to guide statewide transformation of the way that health care and health services are delivered in Vermont. The program is dedicated to a high-value, high-quality health care system for all Vermonters, with a focus on prevention. Currently, Dr. Jones serves on several committees and workgroups, including the Institute of Medicine Consensus Committee on the Learning Healthcare System in America and the Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care. Before this he was an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California and director of the

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APPENDIX B 117 Division of Allergy/Immunology and director of the Allergy/Immunology Residency Training Program in the Department of Pediatrics at the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center. Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H., joined the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2003 as director of the Board on Global Health. He has also been appointed as director of the Board on African Science Academy Development. Dr. Kel- ley has overseen a portfolio of IOM expert consensus studies and convened activities on subjects as wide ranging as the evaluation of the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the U.S. commitment to global health, sustainable surveillance for zoonotic infections, cardiovascular dis- ease prevention in low- and middle-income countries, interpersonal violence prevention in low- and middle-income countries, and microbial threats to health. He also directs a unique capacity-building effort, the African Science Academy Development Initiative, which over 10 years aims to strengthen the capacity of eight African academies to provide independent, evidence-based advice to their governments on scientific matters. Prior to joining the Na- tional Academies, Dr. Kelley served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemiologist, and program manager. Sandeep Kishore, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School and co-chair of the Young Professionals Chronic Disease Network, a global network of 400 young professionals from 50 countries committed to the eq- uitable prevention and treatment of noncommunicable diseases as a social justice issue. He seeks to leverage lateral thinking and transdisciplinary ap- proaches at universities worldwide, with the goal of preparing and cultivat- ing the next generation of young leaders to tackle health challenges of the 21st century. In this capacity he served as a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly in 2011. He is a fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values and a recipient of the Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans. He re- turned to complete his medical training at Cornell’s medical college in 2012. Maryjoan D. Ladden, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, is a senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Her work at the foundation focuses on building a diverse and well-trained leadership and workforce in health and health care. Dr. Ladden manages most of the foundation’s nursing initiatives. She leads the foundation’s efforts in primary care and interpro- fessional collaboration. Prior to joining the foundation, she served as chief program officer of the American Nurses Association (ANA), providing stra- tegic direction, integration, and coordination for all of ANA’s programs. Dr. Ladden also spent more than 20 years as a nurse practitioner, case manager, researcher, and director of continuing professional education at Harvard

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118 INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR COLLABORATION Pilgrim Health Care and as assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. Her work has focused on improving health care quality, safety, and health professional collaboration. Lisa Lehmann, M.D., Ph.D., M.Sc., is the director of the Center for Bioeth- ics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), associate physician in the Jen Center for Primary Care at BWH, and associate professor of medicine and medical ethics at Harvard Medical School. She joined the faculty of the Harvard Medical School Division of Medical Ethics and the BWH Divi- sion of General Internal Medicine in 1999 after completing her fellowship training in general internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Lehmann is a graduate of Cornell University and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She completed her residency training in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital and a Ph.D. in philosophy at Johns Hopkins University. She received an M.Sc. in clinical epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. Edward “Thomas” Lewis III, M.D., is a Postgraduate Year 1 psychiatry resident at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Charles- ton. He graduated from MUSC in 2012 with an M.D. He also completed an interprofessional fellowship through the university. He received a B.S. in biochemistry from Queens University of Charlotte. During medical school, Dr. Lewis’s extracurricular activities included being vice president of the Student Interprofessional Society and serving on the MUSC strategic planning committee for interprofessional development. He volunteered regularly at a student-run medical clinic at a local homeless shelter in town and further served as president for the campus’s student psychiatry interest group. Lorna Lynn, M.D., is the director of practice assessment development and evaluation at the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM). After completing a clinician–educator fellowship in general internal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, she joined the faculty there, serving as director of ambulatory care education and winning three major teaching awards during her 8 years on the faculty. During that time she received a Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Physician Faculty Scholars Award, which funded a study of the problem faced by family caregivers of patients with HIV/AIDS. In 2000 she joined the ABIM staff, where her primary focus has been developing novel assessments as part of ABIM’s program for the evaluation of clinical performance. These assessment tools, called practice improvement modules, are designed with the goal of helping physicians improve the quality of care they provide in their practices.

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APPENDIX B 119 Lucinda L. Maine, Ph.D., serves as executive vice president and chief execu- tive officer of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP). As the leading advocate for high-quality pharmacy education, AACP’s vision is that academic pharmacy will work to transform the future of health care to create a world of healthy people. Dr. Maine previously served as senior vice president for policy, planning, and communications with the American Pharmacists Association (APhA). She served on the faculty at the University of Minnesota, where she practiced in the field of geriatrics, and she was an associate dean at the Samford University School of Pharmacy. Dr. Maine is a pharmacy graduate of Auburn University and received her doctorate at the University of Minnesota. Her research includes projects on aging, pharmacy manpower, and pharmacy-based immunizations. Dr. Maine has been active in leadership roles in the profession. Prior to joining the APhA staff, she served as speaker of the APhA house of delegates and as an APhA trustee. She currently serves as president of the Pharmacy Manpower Project and as a board member for Research!America. Afaf I. Meleis, Ph.D., is the Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, professor of nursing and so- ciology, and director of the school’s WHO Collaborating Center for Nurs- ing and Midwifery Leadership. Before going to Penn, she was a professor on the faculty of nursing at the University of California, Los Angeles, and at the University of California, San Francisco, for 34 years. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Nursing in the United Kingdom, the American Academy of Nursing, and the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar National Advisory Committee, and the George W. Bush Presidential Center Women’s Initiative Policy Advisory Council; a trustee of the National Health Museum; a board member of CARE, the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation Macy Faculty Scholars program, and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health; and chair of the IOM Global Forum on Innovation for Health Professional Education. Dr. Meleis is also president and council general emerita of the International Council on Women’s Health Issues and currently serves as the global am- bassador for the Girl Child Initiative of the International Council of Nurses. Donna Meyer, R.N., M.S.N., is the dean of health sciences and project di- rector for the Lewis and Clark Community College Family Health Clinic, a nurse-managed center. Additionally, she serves as the project director of the Lewis and Clark Family Health Clinic and mobile unit. She is currently serving as the president of the National Organization of Associate Degree Nursing. Her professional nursing activities include being a member of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Academic Progression in Nurs-

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120 INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR COLLABORATION ing Advisory Board, the American Association of Community Colleges Affiliated Council, the Illinois Center for Nursing Advisory Board, the Illinois Healthcare Action Coalition for the Institute of Medicine/Future of Nursing, the Team Illinois/Center to Champion Nursing in America, the National Nursing Centers Consortium Health Policy Committee, and the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society and a site reviewer for the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. Dean Meyer has received various awards for her work, including the MetLife Community College Excellence Award for Innovation, the Illinois Nurses Association Innovation in Health Care Award, the Illinois Community Administrators Award for Innovation, Illinois Nursing Pinnacle Leader of the Year, the Southern Illinois University Outstanding Nursing Alumni Award, and the YWCA Woman of Distinction Award. She recently was inducted into the Southern Illinois University Hall of Fame. J. Lloyd Michener, M.D., is professor and chair of the department of com- munity and family medicine and director of the Duke Center for Com- munity Research. He is a member of the board of the Association of Academic Medical Colleges, co-chair of the Community Engagement Steer- ing Committee at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a member of the Foundation Working Group on Public Health and Medical Education at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and director of the Duke/CDC program in primary care and public health of the American Austrian Foundation–Open Medical Institute. Dr. Michener was appointed to the NIH Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the Institute of Medicine Committee on Integrating Primary Care and Public Health. He was selected for membership on the newly formed National Academic Affiliations Advisory Council for the Department of Veterans Affairs and is a member of the North Carolina Institute of Medicine. Rose Chalo Nabirye, Ph.D., M.P.H., is a senior lecturer and chair of the Department of Nursing at the School of Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University (MU), in Kampala, Uganda. She has been lecturing in the Department of Nursing at Makerere University since 2003 and serves on several college committees, including the School of Medicine and School of Health Sciences’ institutional review boards, and graduate and research, professionalism, and mentorship committees. She is also co- ordinator of the Regional Master of Nursing program at MU. The program was started in collaboration with Bergen University College in Norway, the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences in Tanzania, and the University of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The program is funded by NORAD’s Program for Master Studies. Before joining academia, she worked at

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APPENDIX B 121 Mulago Hospital, the National Referral and Teaching Hospital in Uganda, as a registered clinical nurse and midwife for more than 20 years. Angella Sandra Namwase is pursuing a B.S.N. at Makerere College of Health Sciences. She has great interest in women’s empowerment and improved sexual and reproductive health. For this reason she created has managed to come up with an award-winning project with Make Every Woman Count, an international organization based in London. She loves to write and hopes to advocate for correction in the health system through newspaper journalism. She holds several leadership roles in her college, including as the mentorship coordinator at the undergraduate level, as the vice president of Basoga Medical Student’s association, as the organizing secretary of the Students’ Professionalism and Ethics Club, and as the class representative. Warren Newton, M.D., M.P.H., serves as the vice dean of education at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine. He is respon- sible for the medical students and continuing medical education. He also provides strategic direction for GME at UNC Hospitals. He has led the expansion of the UNC medical school development of a competency-based curriculum, including improving the health of populations and a new inte- grated clinical clerkship. Dr. Newton also serves as the William B. Aycock Distinguished Professor & Chair of Family Medicine. UNC Family Medi- cine has 8 campuses, 150 academic faculty, and 16 residencies and fellow- ships. He is an adjunct professor of epidemiology, and serves as chair of the advisory board for the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services at UNC. Sally Okun, R.N., M.M.H.S., is a member of the research, clinical, and ana- lytics team at PatientLikeMe. As head of health data integrity and patient safety for the company, she is responsible for the site’s medical ontology and the integrity of patient-reported health data. In addition, she developed and oversees the PatientsLikeMe Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance Platform. Prior to joining PatientsLikeMe, Ms. Okun practiced as a palliative care specialist. In addition to working with patients and families facing life- changing illnesses, she was an independent consultant supporting multiyear clinical, research, and education projects focused on palliative and end-of- life care for numerous clients through Brown University, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Department of Mental Health, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Scott Reeves, Ph.D., M.Sc., P.G.C.E., is the founding director of the Cen- ter for Innovation in Interprofessional Healthcare Education. He is a so- cial scientist who has been undertaking health professions education and

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122 INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR COLLABORATION health services research for more than 17 years. He recently moved from Canada, where he spent the past 6 years developing conceptual, empiri- cal, and theoretical knowledge to inform the design, implementation, and evaluation of interprofessional education and practice. He has published more than 100 peer-reviewed papers, numerous book chapters, textbooks, and monographs. He holds honorary faculty positions in a number of institutions around the world. He is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Interprofessional Care. Kathryn Rugen, Ph.D., is the nurse consultant to the Veterans Health Administration centers of excellence in primary care education. In this position she is responsible for facilitating transformation of the centers of excellence. She is also the associate chief nurse for education and research at the Jesse Brown Veterans Administration Medical Center in Chicago. Her responsibilities include nursing education and orientation, scholarship pro- grams, nursing trainee placement, the post-baccalaureate nurse residency program, membership on the research and development committee, and chair of the collaborative institutional review board with academic affiliates (Northwestern University and University of Illinois Medical Schools). She is a practicing nurse practitioner in primary care at the Lakeside Community- based Outpatient Clinic, where she frequently acts as a preceptor to nurse practitioner students. She is an assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing, where she teaches research and evidence-based practice in the graduate program. Madeline Schmitt, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, FNAP, professor emerita, is a nurse- sociologist who, until retirement, was professor and Independence Founda- tion Chair in Nursing and Interprofessional Education at the University of Rochester School of Nursing. She remains active in research and publica- tion as well as in limited teaching about interprofessional collaboration. She consults and presents nationally and internationally on the topic. Since the 1970s she has focused her career on interprofessional collaborative prac- tice. She was a co-chair of the All Altogether, Better Health III international interprofessional education (IPE) conference in London in 2006 and the major consultant to the first American–Canadian joint conference focused on IPE—Collaborating Across Borders I—hosted in 2007 by the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Center. Nelson Sewankambo, M.B.Ch.B., M.Sc., M.D., trained in general medicine and internal medicine at Makerere University (MU) in Uganda and later graduated with a degree in clinical epidemiology from McMaster Uni- versity, Canada. He is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, UK, a professor of Medicine at MU, and is the principal (head) of Makerere Uni-

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APPENDIX B 123 versity College of Health Sciences. Until 2007 he was dean of the Makerere University Medical School for 11 years. He contributed to the seminal work of the Sub-Saharan African Medical Schools Study (2008–2010). As co-chair of the education/production subcommittee of the Joint Learning initiative he contributed to the landmark report titled Human Resources for Health: Overcoming the Crisis, which had a major influence on the WHO and its subsequent 2006 report, Together for Health, which focused on the global crisis of health workers and the need for urgent action to enhance population health. Stefanus Snyman, M.B.Ch.B., DOM, is the manager of interprofessional education and service-learning at the Centre for Health Professions Edu- cation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, South Africa. He is a qualified occupational medicine practitioner and health professions educationalist. His special interest is interprofessional practice and how it strengthens health systems and improves patient out- comes. He is a member of the Functioning and Disability Work Group of the World Health Organization, advising on issues related to health profes- sions education and e-learning. Elizabeth Speakman, Ed.D., R.N., is co-director of the Jefferson Center for Interprofessional Education and associate professor of nursing at Thomas Jefferson University. Since joining the university in 2003, Dr. Speakman has served as assistant dean of the R.N.-to-B.S.N. program and, most recently, as associate dean for student affairs. She is principal investigator on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing grant, which to date has funded $430,000 in scholarships for second-degree nursing stu- dents enrolled in the one-year facilitated accelerated course track program. Recognition of Dr. Speakman’s leadership role in nursing education includes fellowship in the Academy of Nursing Education, selection as a Johnson & Johnson and a Jonas Foundation Faculty Mentor, and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellow. Harrison C. Spencer, M.D., M.P.H., became the first full-time president and chief executive officer of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health in 2000. From 1996 to 2000, Dr. Spencer was dean of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Before then he was dean of the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans. During his career with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Dr. Spencer served as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer and at the field station in El Salvador. He founded and for 5 years (1979–1984) directed the CDC research station in Nairobi, Kenya, and he then served as senior medical officer at the World Health Organization Malaria Action

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124 INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR COLLABORATION Program in Geneva. Dr. Spencer was elected a founding fellow of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences in 1998 and to the Institute of Medicine in 2003. Maria Tassone, M.Sc., is the inaugural director of the Centre for Inter- professional Education, a strategic partnership between the University  of Toronto and the University Health Network (UHN). She is also the senior director of health professions and interprofessional care and integration at the UHN in Toronto, a network of four hospitals: Toronto General, Toronto Western, Toronto Rehab, and Princess Margaret. Ms. Tassone holds a B.S. in physical therapy from McGill University and an M.S. from the University of Western Ontario, and she is an assistant professor in the department of physical therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. Ms. Tassone was the UHN project lead for the coaching arm of the Catalyzing and Sustaining Communities of Collaboration Around Interprofessional Care, which was recently awarded the Ontario Hospital Association international Ted Freedman Award for Education Innovation. John Tegzes, M.A., V.M.D., has an educational and professional back- ground that includes nursing, psychology, and veterinary medicine. He has worked as a nurse primarily in community health and hospice and as a veterinarian in small animal practice. He is a board-certified specialist in clinical toxicology, and he has worked for the California Poison Control System, the Oregon Poison Center, and a state diagnostic toxicology labo- ratory. Currently he serves as the director of interprofessional education at the Western University of Health Sciences with a joint appointment as a professor of toxicology. His work at Western focuses primarily on prepar- ing graduates from nine health professions for collaborative, team-based practice. George E. Thibault, M.D., became the seventh president of the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation in 2008. Immediately prior to that, he served as vice president of clinical affairs at Partners Healthcare System in Boston and as director of the academy at Harvard Medical School (HMS). He was the first Daniel D. Federman Professor of Medicine and Medical Education at HMS and is now the Federman Professor, Emeritus. Dr. Thibault previ- ously served as chief medical officer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and as chief of medicine at the Harvard-affiliated Brockton/West Roxbury Veterans Administration Hospital. He was associate chief of medicine and director of the internal medical residency program at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). At the MGH he also served as director of the Medical Intensive Care Unit and as founding director of the Medical Prac- tice Evaluation Unit.

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APPENDIX B 125 Samuel O. Thier, M.D., is professor of medicine and health care policy emeritus at Harvard Medical School. He had been a professor of medicine in those areas at Harvard Medical School from 1994 to 2007. Previously he served as president and chief executive officer of Partners HealthCare System, president of Massachusetts General Hospital, and president of Brandeis University. He served as president of the Institute of Medicine and as chair of the department of internal medicine at Yale University School of Medicine, where he was Sterling Professor. Dr. Thier is a director of Charles River Laboratories, Inc., and the Foundation of the National Institutes of Health. He is a member of the board of overseers of Cornell University Weill Medical College, the board of overseers of Brandeis University Heller School for Social Policy and Management (chair), and the board of dean’s advisors of Harvard School of Public Health. Brigid Vaughan, M.D., attended New York Medical College and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, then trained in child and adolescent psy- chiatry at New Jersey Medical School and Children’s Hospital Boston (CHB)/Harvard Medical School. She worked at CHB for more than 15 years. Early on she was medical director of inpatient psychiatry, and later she served in an outpatient role, specializing in the treatment of substance use disorders. She was co-founder of the Adolescent Substance Abuse Program, served as its first director of psychiatry and as clinical associate with the Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research, and became the director of psychopharmacology at Children’s. Sarita Verma, L.L.B., M.D., is a professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, deputy dean of the Faculty of Medicine, and associate vice provost for health professions education at the University of Toronto (U of T). She has been a diplomat in Canada’s foreign service and worked with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Sudan and Ethiopia for several years. Dr. Verma is the 2006 recipient of the Donald Richards Wilson Award in medical education from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the 2009 corecipient of the May Cohen Gender Equity Award from the Association of Faculties of Medicine in Canada. Along with colleagues at McGill Uni- versity, the University of British Columbia, and U of T she has been the lead consultant for the Future of Medical Education in Canada–Postgraduate project on the Liaison and Engagement Strategy and the Environmental Scan Scientific Study. As deputy dean, Dr. Verma leads strategic planning and implementation as well as communications and external relations. Additionally, she is responsible for integrated education across the health sciences and liaison with affiliated partners.

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126 INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR COLLABORATION Patricia Hinton Walker, Ph.D., R.N., has held national prominence for more than 25 years as a leader in health care and health sciences educa- tion as the dean of a school of nursing. She is a Chief Nursing Officer in hospital- and community-based care and in the health information technology and policy arenas. She serves as senior advisor to the TIGER (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) Initiative Foundation and is often sought to speak on topics such as health informatics; the use of technology in education, practice, and research; leadership; and cultural change in health care and education. She is currently vice president for policy and strategic initiatives at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, where she previously served as dean. In 2001 she was senior scholar in residence at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Policy, focusing on cost and quality outcomes as well as on patient safety research. Currently she serves as an internal coach and consultant on pa- tient safety and TeamSTEPPS to the DoD (Department of Defense) Patient Safety Program within Tricare Management Activity (a component of the Military Health Care System). Margaretha Wilhelmsson, Ph.D., is a biomedical scientist. She worked in hospital laboratories and with blood banks for many years before she became a lecturer and vice study director in the education of biomedical scientists at Linköping University. For more than 20 years Dr. Wilhelmsson has been involved in the interprofessional education program in Linköping, called “The Linköping model,” both as a tutor and as a director of study. Dr. Wilhelmsson’s research focuses on interprofessional competence. A central question she has sought to answer is “Can interprofessional com- petence be trained?” Jenny Wong is a third-year pharmacy student at the University of Minne- sota. She is currently the chair of CLARION, a student-driven, staff- and faculty-advised committee focused on co-curricular, interprofessional ex- periences for University of Minnesota Academic Health Center students. CLARION holds a yearly national case-based competition in which inter- professional teams of students present a root cause analysis of a fictitious sentinel event to a panel of senior-level health executives. She graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a bachelor’s degree in information science and public health and previously worked as a consultant in Washington, DC. Paul Worley, MBBS, Ph.D., is dean of medicine at Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia. Dr. Worley studied medicine at the University of Ad- elaide. In 1992 he was elected president of the Rural Doctors Association of South Australia, and in 1994 he was appointed senior lecturer in rural

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APPENDIX B 127 health at Flinders University. In addition to maintaining an active clinical workload in rural and urban practice, he is responsible for coordinating the rapid expansion of Flinders University’s rural programs. He is also the past academic director on the board of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine and the executive chair of the Rural and Remote Area Placement Program. In 2001 Dr. Worley was appointed professor and di- rector of the Flinders University Rural Clinical School and editor-in-chief of Rural and Remote Health, the international journal of rural and remote health research, education, practice, and policy. Matthew K. Wynia, M.D., M.P.H., is an internist and specialist in infec- tious diseases. At the American Medical Association he oversees projects on topics that include learning from medical errors, physician profes- sionalism, ethics and epidemics, medicine and the Holocaust, and inequi- ties in health and health care. Dr. Wynia is the author of more than 125 published articles and a book on fairness in health care benefit design. His work has been published in leading medical and health policy journals, and he has been a guest on ABC News Nightline, the BBC World Service, NPR, and other programs. Dr. Wynia cares for patients at the University of Chicago. Brenda Zierler, Ph.D., R.N., conducts research exploring the relationships between the delivery of health care and outcomes at both the patient and system level. Her primary appointment is in the School of Nursing at the University of Washington, but she holds three adjunct appointments: two in the School of Medicine (department of surgery and department of medi- cal education and biomedical informatics), and one in the School of Public Health (department of health services). As co–principal investigator of a Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation–funded study (with Brian Ross, M.D., Ph.D.), Dr. Zierler leads a group of interprofessional faculty and students in the development of a simulation-based, team training program to improve col- laborative interprofessional communication both within teams and with patients. Her team is currently validating the impact of simulation-based team training on students’ interprofessional communication skills as mea- sured by an innovative Web-based assessment tool. Sanjay P. Zodpey, M.D., Ph.D., works as director of public health educa- tion at the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), New Delhi, and also holds a leadership role as director at Indian Institutes of Public Health, Delhi. He served as director of Indian Institute of Public Health, Gandhi- nagar and Bhubaneswar. He earlier worked as professor of preventive and social medicine and as vice dean at Government Medical College, Nagpur. Professor Zodpey is involved in designing several capacity development

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128 INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR COLLABORATION initiatives, including long-term academic programs at PHFI. He is currently undertaking situation analysis of education for health professions in India. He is also involved in several research initiatives related to education for health professionals, including designing competency-based frameworks for various categories of health professionals; the assessment of the impact of educational initiatives on performance of health professionals; research in the governance of education for health professionals in India; and estima- tion of the need of various categories of health professionals in the country. He is currently leading the project supported by the U.S. Agency for Inter- national Development for designing human resources for health policy for the government of Jharkhand (India).