D

Committee Biographical Sketches

Robert S. Lawrence, M.D. (Chair), is the Center for a Livable Future Professor and professor of environmental health sciences, health policy, and international health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Lawrence is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School, and trained in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He served for 3 years as an epidemic intelligence service officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Public Health Service.

Dr. Lawrence is a master of the American College of Physicians and a fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine, the American Public Health Association, and Physicians for Human Rights. From 1970 to 1974, he was a member of the faculty of medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he helped develop a primary health care system funded by the Office of Economic Opportunity. In 1974, he was appointed the first director of the division of primary care at Harvard Medical School, where he subsequently served as the Charles S. Davidson Associate Professor of Medicine and chief of medicine at the Cambridge Hospital until 1991. From 1991 to 1995, he was the director of health sciences at the Rockefeller Foundation.

From 1984 to 1989, Dr. Lawrence chaired the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force of the Department of Health and Human Services and served on its successor, the Preventive Services Task Force, from 1990 to 1995. He currently serves as a consultant to the Task Force on Community Preventive



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D Committee Biographical Sketches Robert S. Lawrence, M.D. (Chair), is the Center for a Livable Future Pro- fessor and professor of environmental health sciences, health policy, and in- ternational health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Lawrence is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School, and trained in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He served for 3 years as an epidemic intelligence service officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. Lawrence is a master of the American College of Physicians and a fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medi- cine, the American Public Health Association, and Physicians for Human Rights. From 1970 to 1974, he was a member of the faculty of medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he helped develop a primary health care system funded by the Office of Economic Opportunity. In 1974, he was appointed the first director of the division of primary care at Harvard Medical School, where he subsequently served as the Charles S. Davidson Associate Professor of Medicine and chief of medicine at the Cambridge Hospital until 1991. From 1991 to 1995, he was the director of health sciences at the Rockefeller Foundation. From 1984 to 1989, Dr. Lawrence chaired the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force of the Department of Health and Human Services and served on its successor, the Preventive Services Task Force, from 1990 to 1995. He currently serves as a consultant to the Task Force on Community Preventive 159

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160 ASSESSING THE VALUE OF COMMUNITY-BASED PREVENTION Services at the CDC. Dr. Lawrence has participated in human rights investi- gations on behalf of Physicians for Human Rights and other human rights groups in Chile, Czechoslovakia, Egypt, El Salvador, Guatemala, Kosovo, the Philippines, and South Africa. In 1996, Dr. Lawrence became the founding director of the Center for a Livable Future at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. The center is an interdisciplinary group of faculty and staff that focuses on equity, health, and the Earth’s resources. Research, education, and advocacy examine the relationships among diet, food production systems, the environment, and human health. The center’s website is http://www.jhsph.edu/clf. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, Ph.D., M.D., M.A.S., is associate professor of medicine and epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), an attending physician at San Francisco General Hospital, and the co-director of the UCSF Center for Vulnerable Popula- tions. Dr. Bibbins-Domingo is an active researcher in preventive cardiology, the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease in young adults, and race- and gender-related health and health care disparities. Her research has exam- ined the development of cardiovascular risk factors in young adults, the effectiveness of screening and diagnostic tests for cardiovascular disease, computer-simulated projections of future cardiovascular disease trends, and the impact of public health and clinical interventions on cardiovascu- lar disease prevention. She is an inducted member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. Dr. Bibbins-Domingo served on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Evaluation of the Presumptive Disability Decision-Making Process for Veterans from 2006 to 2007 and the IOM Vaccine Safety Committee from 2010 to 2011. She is currently a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Dr. Bibbins-Domingo received her undergraduate degree in molecular biology and public policy from Princeton University and her medical degree, Ph.D. in biochemistry, and master’s in clinical research from the UCSF. Laura K. Brennan, Ph.D., M.P.H., is founder, president, and CEO of Trans- tria LLC, a certified, woman-owned, small public health research and consulting company in St. Louis, Missouri, with a vision of uniting people, places, and policies to revolutionize public health. She is an assistant profes- sor of behavioral science and health education in the department of commu- nity health at Saint Louis University School of Public Health. Dr. Brennan has led multiple projects at the national, state, and local levels with practi- tioners, researchers, providers, community members, and advocacy groups, related to designing, planning, implementing, or evaluating research- and practice-based efforts to address social, economic, and environmental influ- ences on behaviors and health.

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APPENDIX D 161 Dr. Brennan has published 19 peer-reviewed articles studying behaviors and health. She is the lead author on Promoting Healthy Equity: A Resource to Help Communities Address Social Determinants of Health (a publication of the CDC); a co-author on Tailoring Health Messages: Customizing Com- munication with Computer Technology; and a co-author on Local Govern- ment Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity (a publication of the IOM). She is president of the board for the Missouri Family Health Council. Norman Daniels, Ph.D., is the Mary B. Saltonstall Professor and profes- sor of ethics and population health in the department of global health and population at the Harvard School of Public Health. Formerly chair of the philosophy department at Tufts University, where he taught from 1969 to 2002, his most recent books include Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly (2008); Setting Limits Fairly: Learning to Share Resources for Health, 2nd edition (2008); From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice (2000); and Is Inequality Bad for Our Health? (2000). His research is on justice and health policy, including priority setting in health systems, fairness and health systems reform, health inequalities, and intergenerational justice. He directs the ethics concentration of the health policy Ph.D., recently won the Everett Mendelsohn Award for mentoring graduate students, and teaches courses on ethics and health inequalities and justice and resource allocation. Darrell J. Gaskin, Ph.D., is associate professor of health economics and deputy director of the Center for Health Disparities Solutions in the depart- ment of health policy and management at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University. He is an internationally known ex- pert in health care disparities, access to care for vulnerable populations, and safety net hospitals. His goal is to identify and understand barriers to care for vulnerable populations; to develop and promote policies and practices that improve access to care for the poor, minorities, and other vulnerable populations; and to eliminate race, ethnic, socioeconomic, and geographic disparities in health and health care. His research has been supported by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities; the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; the National Institute on Aging; the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the Health Re- sources and Services Administration Maternal and Child Health Bureau; the Commonwealth Fund; the Kaiser Family Foundation; and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Gaskin has published in the leading health services research jour- nals, including Health Services Research (HSR), Health Affairs, Medical Care Research and Review, Medical Care, and Inquiry. Currently, he serves on the editorial boards of HSR and Medical Care Research and Review. In

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162 ASSESSING THE VALUE OF COMMUNITY-BASED PREVENTION 2002, Dr. Gaskin was awarded AcademyHealth’s Article-of-the-Year Award for his HSR article titled “Are Urban Safety-Net Hospitals Losing Low-Risk Medicaid Maternity Patients?” Currently, he is a member of the board of directors of AcademyHealth and the National Economic Association. He has served on the governing council of the American Public Health Asso- ciation. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System. The governor of Maryland has appointed him to the board of directors of the Maryland Health Benefits Exchange Board, where he serves as vice chairman. Also, Dr. Gaskin served for 4 years on the board of directors of the Maryland Health Insurance Plan, the state’s high-risk insurance pool. Dr. Gaskin has served on the faculties of the University of Maryland, College Park, and Georgetown University. His Ph.D. is in health economics from the Johns Hopkins University. He holds a master’s degree in econom- ics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor’s degree in economics from Brandeis University. Lawrence W. Green, M.P.H., Dr.P.H., is the co-director of the society, di- versity, and disparities program at the UCSF. Before joing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a distinguished fellow/visiting scientist in 1999, Dr. Green was director of the Institute of Health Promotion Re- search in the faculty of graduate studies and professor of health care and epidemiology in the faculty of medicine at the University of British Colum- bia, where he also headed the division of preventive medicine and health promotion. Dr. Green received his degrees in public health at the University of California (UC), Berkeley. He worked as a health educator in local, state, and federal health agencies in California and for the Ford Foundation in Dhaka, East Pakistan (now Bangladesh), and served as the first director of the U.S. Office of Health Information and Health Promotion. He has served on the public health faculties at UC Berkeley, Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University, University of Texas, University of British Columbia, and Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health, and now at the UCSF. Dr. Green serves as the Kaiser Family Foundation’s vice president and director of its national health promotion program, which received the Foundation Award of the National Association of Prevention Professionals. Robert Haveman, Ph.D., is the John Bascom Professor of Economics and Public Policy, department of economics and Robert M. La Follette Institute of Public Affairs, and research affiliate, Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He received his B.A. degree from Calvin College in 1958 and his Ph.D. in economics from Vanderbilt Uni- versity in 1963. Prior to 1970, he was professor of economics at Grinnell College, senior economist at the Joint Economic Committee, U.S. Congress,

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APPENDIX D 163 and research professor at the Brookings Institution. From 1970 to 1975, he was director of the Institute for Research on Poverty. In 1975-1976, Dr. Haveman was a fellow at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, and in 1984-1985 he served as Tinbergen Professor at Erasmus University, The Netherlands. From 1988 to 1991, he was director of the Robert M. L ­ aFollette Institute of Public Affairs, and from 1993 to 1996 served as chair of the department of economics. He was co-editor of the American Economic Review from 1985 to 1991. His primary fields of interest are public finance, the economics of poverty, and social policy (including disability policy). Jennifer Jenson, M.P.H., M.P.P., is a managing senior fellow at Partnership for Prevention. In this role, she leads work to demonstrate the value of clinical and community preventive services, and helps develop and pro- mote the organization’s policy agenda. She is committed to developing and applying evidence-based methods to evaluate preventive services, using evidence in policy making, and presenting information in a format that is helpful for decision makers. Before joining Partnership for Prevention, Ms. Jenson spent most of her professional career as a policy advisor to the U.S. Congress. Her experience includes analytic and management roles at the Congressional Budget Office, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, and the Congressional Research Service. In addition to these congressional roles, Ms. Jenson has worked on Medicaid policy at the White House Office of Management and Budget. She holds master’s degrees in public health and public policy from the University of Michigan and undergraduate degrees in political science and public health from UC San Diego. F. Javier Nieto, M.D., Ph.D., is chair of the department of population health sciences, Helfaer Professor of Public Health, and professor of popu- lation health sciences and family medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine. His research interests include cardiovascular disease epidemiology, markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, emerging risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and health consequences of sleep disorders and psychosocial stress. He is co-author of a textbook on intermediate epidemi- ology methods titled Epidemiology: Beyond the Basics, and has served as a member of the editorial board of the American Journal of Epidemiology. Dr. Nieto received his M.D. from the University of Valencia, Spain, and completed a residency in family and community medicine. After a brief pe- riod working for the Spanish government in developing primary health care centers in a rural area of central Spain, he came to the United States. He earned an M.H.S. and Ph.D. in epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University. Daniel Polsky, Ph.D., is professor of medicine in the division of general internal medicine and professor of health care management in the Wharton

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164 ASSESSING THE VALUE OF COMMUNITY-BASED PREVENTION School at the University of Pennsylvania, and the director of research at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. In 2007-2008 he was the senior economist on health issues at the President’s Council of Eco- nomic Advisers. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1996 and a master’s in public policy from the University of Michigan in 1989. He was awarded the Samuel Martin Health Evaluation Sciences Research Award in 2005. His research areas include health insur- ance and financial access to health care, economic evaluation of medical and behavioral health interventions, and the health care workforce. The link between all of his research is a commitment to establishing causal relationships among either medical or health system interventions and health and economic outcomes using randomized trials, administrative clinical data, and national health surveys. In addition to his publications in the Journal of Health Economics, Health Services Research, and Medical Care, he is a co-author of the book Economic Evaluation in Clinical Trials, recently published by Oxford University Press. Louise Potvin, Ph.D., completed her doctorate in public health and post- doctoral training in program evaluation at the Université de Montréal. She is currently professor in the department of social and preventive medicine, Université de Montréal, and scientific director of the Centre Léa-Roback sur les Inégalités Sociales de Santé de Montréal. She holds the CHSRF/CIHR Chair on Community Approaches and Health Inequalities. This chair aims to document how public health interventions in support of local social development contribute to the reduction of health inequalities in urban set- tings. Her main research interests are the evaluation of community health promotion programs and how local social environments are conducive to health. She was a member of the World Health Organization (WHO)– Europe Working Group on the Evaluation of Health Promotion. She is a member of the Canadian Reference Group on the Social Determinants of Health and the WHO Scientific Resource Group on Health Equity Analysis and Research. She is a globally elected member of the board of trustees of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education and a fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences.  Nicolaas P. Pronk, Ph.D., is vice president for health management and health science officer for JourneyWell at HealthPartners in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and senior research investigator at the HealthPartners Research Foundation. Dr. Pronk holds an adjunct faculty position as professor of society, human development, and health at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Pronk is widely published in both the scientific and practice literature and a national and international speaker on health and productiv- ity management. He is president of the International Association for Work- site Health Promotion and a member of the Task Force on Community

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APPENDIX D 165 Preventive Services. Formerly, Dr. Pronk served on the Clinical Obesity Re- search Panel at the National Institutes of Health, the Carter Center Medical Home initiative, the Defense Health Board (Armed Forces Epidemiological Board), the Health Promotion Advisory Panel at the National Committee for Quality Assurance, and the Institute of Medicine’s Committee to Assess Health Promotion Programs at NASA. He is the senior editor of ACSM’s Worksite Health Handbook, 2nd edition, and the author of the scientific background paper for the U.S. National Physical Activity Plan for Business and Industry. Dr. Pronk received his doctorate in exercise physiology at Texas A&M University and completed his postdoctoral studies in behav- ioral medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Louise B. Russell, Ph.D., is research professor at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research, and professor in the department of economics, Rutgers University. Her research focuses on the methods and application of cost-effectiveness analysis. Before joining Rutgers, Dr. Russell was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Elected to membership in the IOM in 1983, she has served on several IOM commit- tees, including the National Cancer Policy Board (2001-2005). Dr. Russell co-chaired the U.S. Public Health Service Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine, which published recommendations for improving the quality and comparability of cost-effectiveness studies in the book Cost- Effectiveness in Health and Medicine (Oxford University Press, 1996) and three articles in the Journal of the American Medical Association (October 1996). She was also a member of the first U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (1984-1988). Dr. Russell is an associate editor of the journal Medical Decision Making and has published many articles and seven books, includ- ing Is Prevention Better Than Cure? (Brookings, 1986), and Technology in Hospitals: Medical Advances and Their Diffusion (Brookings, 1979). Steven M. Teutsch, M.D., M.P.H., became the chief science officer, Los A ­ ngeles County Public Health, in February 2009, where he will continue his work on evidence-based public health and policy. He had previously been in the Outcomes Research and Management program at Merck (since October 1997), where he was responsible for scientific leadership in devel- oping evidence-based clinical management programs, conducting outcomes research studies, and improving outcomes measurement to enhance quality of care. Prior to joining Merck, Dr. Teutsch was director of the Division of Prevention Research and Analytic Methods (DPRAM) at the CDC, where he was responsible for assessing the effectiveness, safety, and cost-effective- ness of disease and injury prevention strategies. DPRAM developed compa- rable methodology for studies of the effectiveness and economic impact of

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166 ASSESSING THE VALUE OF COMMUNITY-BASED PREVENTION prevention programs, provided training in these methods, developed CDC’s capacity for conducting necessary studies, and provided technical assistance for conducting economic and decision analysis. The division also evalu- ated the impact of interventions in urban areas, developed the Guide to Community Preventive Services, and provided support for CDC’s analytic methods. He has served as a member of that task force and the U.S. Preven- tive Services Task Force, which develops the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, as well as on America’s Health Information Community Personal- ized Health Care Workgroup. He currently chairs the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics Health and Society, and serves on the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Prevention and Practice Workgroup as well as Institute of Medicine panels. Dr. Teutsch joined CDC in 1977, where he was assigned to the Parasitic Diseases Division and worked extensively on toxoplasmosis. He was then assigned to the kidney donor program and subsequently the kidney disease program. He developed the framework for CDC’s diabetes control program. Dr. Teutsch joined the epidemiology program office and became the director of the Division of Surveillance and Epidemiology, where he was responsible for CDC’s disease monitoring ac- tivities. He became chief of the Prevention Effectiveness Activity in 1992. Dr. Teutsch was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He received his under- graduate degree in biochemical sciences at Harvard University in 1970, an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health in 1973, and his M.D. from Duke University School of Medicine in 1974. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at Pennsylvania State University, Hershey. He was certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in 1977 and the American Board of Preventive Medicine in 1995, and is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Teutsch is an adjunct professor at the Emory University School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management and the University of North Carolina School of Public Health. Dr. Teutsch has published more than 150 articles and 6 books in a broad range of fields in epidemiology, including parasitic diseases, diabetes, technology assessment, health services research, and surveillance. Chapin White, Ph.D., is a senior health researcher at the Center for Study- ing Health System Change (HSC) who has focused on microsimulation modeling of health reform, long-term trends and geographic variation in health spending, medical malpractice, nonprofit hospitals, and Medicare payment policy. At HSC, he is focusing on policy analyses relating to the implementation of health reform and original research quantifying the likely impacts of health reform. Dr. White was formerly a principal analyst at the Congressional Budget Office, a postdoctoral fellow at the National

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APPENDIX D 167 Bureau of Economic Research, a consultant to the Medicare Payment Advi- sory Commission, and an analyst at Abt Associates. He earned his doctor- ate in health policy from Harvard University, a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and a bachelor’s degree in social anthropology, cum laude, from Harvard.

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