Closing Remarks

Alan Wm. Wolff
Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP
and
Chair, U.S. National Academies Committee
on Comparative National Innovation Policies

Mr. Wolff commented that the spirited exchanges of the roundtable signified both the uncertainties and the urgency of innovation policy, especially in regard to energy issues. He returned to a primary theme of the workshop, cooperation and competition between the two countries, and underlined the need for both if the technological and policy challenges are to be clarified and addressed. “I think today that Germany and the United States demonstrated how much we have to offer each other.” He closed by thanking his hosts in Berlin, and urging that the dialogue continue to support what turned out to be a “major undertaking.”

Klaus F. Zimmermann
Director, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
and
German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin)

Dr. Zimmerman closed the symposium with words of thanks and gratitude for the participants and organizers, and for the many informative talks packed into two days.

Looking beyond the symposium, he urged his colleagues not only to continue monitoring the issues raised during discussions, but also to give great attention to issues not much discussed, especially that of security, and how best to deal with catastrophes. He also emphasized importance of the service sector, on which much employment depends, and the employment consequences of innovation.

He concluded by urging both partner countries to maintain the “freshness of debate between and with the policy makers directly,” and to share and shape transatlantic responses to policy challenges. “What can the United States and Germany do together,” he asked, “to make the best contribution?”



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 174
174 MEETING GLOBAL CHALLENGES Closing Remarks Alan Wm. Wolff Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP and Chair, U.S. National Academies Committee on Comparative National Innovation Policies Mr. Wolff commented that the spirited exchanges of the roundtable signified both the uncertainties and the urgency of innovation policy, especially in regard to energy issues. He returned to a primary theme of the workshop, cooperation and competition between the two countries, and underlined the need for both if the technological and policy challenges are to be clarified and addressed. “I think today that Germany and the United States demonstrated how much we have to offer each other.” He closed by thanking his hosts in Berlin, and urging that the dialogue continue to support what turned out to be a “major undertaking.” Klaus F. Zimmermann Director, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) and German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) Dr. Zimmerman closed the symposium with words of thanks and gratitude for the participants and organizers, and for the many informative talks packed into two days. Looking beyond the symposium, he urged his colleagues not only to continue monitoring the issues raised during discussions, but also to give great attention to issues not much discussed, especially that of security, and how best to deal with catastrophes. He also emphasized importance of the service sector, on which much employment depends, and the employment consequences of innovation. He concluded by urging both partner countries to maintain the “freshness of debate between and with the policy makers directly,” and to share and shape transatlantic responses to policy challenges. “What can the United States and Germany do together,” he asked, “to make the best contribution?”