Appendix A

Workshop Agenda

THE CONTAGION OF VIOLENCE—A WORKSHOP APRIL 30-MAY 1, 2012

OVERVIEW:
The contagion of violence is a universal phenomenon, occurring at all levels of society and affecting a broad spectrum of individuals. This workshop will present an interdisciplinary, ecological, life-course perspective on the contagion of violence, the processes that promote it, and mechanisms to interrupt and prevent the contagion of violence and promote the contagion of nonviolence.

OBJECTIVES:

  •  To examine the extent of contagion of violence, the different emotional and cognitive processes through which contagion occurs, and the social and structural moderators of the contagion of violence.

  •  To explore the role of exposure to violence and violent victimization in the spread of interpersonal and self-directed violence and of internalizing and externalizing psychological problems.

  •  To understand how the contagion of violence can be interrupted and prevented and how nonviolence can become contagious.



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Appendix A Workshop Agenda THE CONTAGION OF VIOLENCE—A WORKSHOP APRIL 30-MAY 1, 2012 OVERVIEW: The contagion of violence is a universal phenomenon, occurring at all levels of society and affecting a broad spectrum of individuals. This workshop will present an interdisciplinary, ecological, life-course per- spective on the contagion of violence, the processes that promote it, and mechanisms to interrupt and prevent the contagion of violence and promote the contagion of nonviolence. OBJECTIVES: • To examine the extent of contagion of violence, the different emotional and cognitive processes through which contagion occurs, and the social and structural moderators of the conta- gion of violence. • To explore the role of exposure to violence and violent victim- ization in the spread of interpersonal and self-directed violence and of internalizing and externalizing psychological problems. • To understand how the contagion of violence can be inter- rupted and prevented and how nonviolence can become contagious. 147

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148 CONTAGION OF VIOLENCE DAY 1: MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012 Check-in will begin at 8:15 AM. A continental breakfast will be available. 8:50 AM Welcome Patrick Kelley, Institute of Medicine 9:00 AM Opening Remarks Valerie Maholmes, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development 9:10 AM Introduction Jacquelyn Campbell, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and Forum on Global Violence Prevention Co-Chair 9:20 AM Overview of the Contagion of Violence Gary Slutkin, University of Illinois at Chicago Moderated Q&A and Discussion 10:05 AM BREAK 10:30 AM - 12:45 PM SESSION I: Contagion of Violence in Multiple Settings This session will discuss how violence leads to additional violence. This can occur either as a “viral” spread of one act of violence to many acts of violence, or as a “spillover” effect from one setting or type of vio- lence to another. How does the contagion of violence manifest across types of violence? How are types of violence interrelated? Conversely, how can the spread of violence be halted or prevented? Facilitator: Rowell Huesmann, University of Michigan 10:30 AM Opening Remarks Rowell Huesmann, University of Michigan Brief Overviews 10:35 AM The Contagion of Street and Community Violence Jeffrey Fagan, Columbia Law School

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APPENDIX A 149 10:50 AM The Contagion of Self-Directed Violence Madelyn Gould, Columbia University 11:10 AM The Contagion of Collective Violence Eric Dubow, Bowling Green State University 11:25 AM The Contagion of Family Violence Charlotte Watts, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 11:40 AM Contagion, Group Marginalization, and Resilience Carl Bell, Community Mental Health Council 11:55 AM Facilitated Panel Discussion 12:20 PM Moderated Q&A and Discussion 12:45 PM - 1:45 PM LUNCH 1:45 PM - 4:00 PM SESSION II: Theories, Processes, and Mechanisms of Contagion How and why does violence spread? This section will explore the internal and external processes and mechanisms at work. It will also explore the interruption of such processes and mechanisms, and their use for spreading nonviolent messaging and practices. Panelists will offer a brief overview of their respective perspectives and then engage in a facilitated discussion. Facilitator: Robert Ursano, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress 1:45 PM Opening Remarks Robert Ursano, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress Brief Overviews 1:55 PM Social-Cognitive Processes in the Contagion of Violence Rowell Huesmann, University of Michigan 2:10 PM Social Contagion and Group Dynamics in Contagion Deanna Wilkinson, The Ohio State University

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150 CONTAGION OF VIOLENCE 2:20 PM Contagion, Social Influence and Intimate Partner Violence Anita Raj, University California, San Diego 2:30 PM The Role of Emotions and Evolution in Contagion Jeffrey Victoroff, University of Southern California  2:40 PM The Neuroscience of Empathy and Contagion Jamil Zaki, Stanford University 2:50 PM Imitation and Mirror Neurons in the Contagion Process Marco Iacoboni, University of California, Los Angeles 3:00 PM Facilitated Panel Discussion 3:35 PM Moderated Q&A and Discussion 3:50 PM Wrap-Up Robert Ursano, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress 4:00 PM BREAK 4:20 PM - 5:30 PM SESSION III: The Contagion at Work This session will explore some recent, real-world examples of the spread of violence from singular events or settings. Speakers will also examine possibilities for preventing violence or mitigating the effects of violence. Facilitator: Gary Slutkin, University of Illinois at Chicago 4:20 PM Opening Remarks Gary Slutkin, University of Illinois at Chicago 4:25 PM Contagion in the London Riots Jason Featherstone, Surviving Our Streets 4:40 PM Contagion in the Arab Spring Zainab Al-Suwaij, American Islamic Congress

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APPENDIX A 151 4:55 PM Facilitated Panel Discussion and Moderated Q&A 5:30 PM ADJOURN DAY 1 DAY 2: TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012 Check-in will begin at 8:15 AM. A continental breakfast will be available. 9:00 AM Overview of Day 1 Rowell Huesmann, University of Michigan 9:20 AM - 11:30 AM SESSION IV: Social and Structural Moderators/Cofactors of the Contagion of Violence This session will focus on how systems and practices can contribute to the exacerbation of, or the reduction and prevention of, the transmis- sion of violence. Panelists will offer a brief overview of their respective perspectives and then engage in a facilitated discussion. Facilitator: Evelyn P. Tomaszewski, National Association of Social Workers 9:20 AM Opening Remarks Evelyn P. Tomaszewski, National Association of Social Workers Brief Overviews 9:30 AM The Role of Punishment, Incarceration, and Re-entry Barry Krisberg, University of California, Berkeley, School of Law 9:45 AM The Role of Historical Trauma Iris PrettyPaint, Native Aspirations, Kauffman & Associates, Inc. 10:00 AM The Role of Family and Positive Parenting Deborah Gorman-Smith, Chapin Hall 10:15 AM The Role of Migration and Population Displacement Fariyal Ross-Sheriff, Howard University

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152 CONTAGION OF VIOLENCE 10:30 AM Facilitated Panel Discussion 11:00 AM Audience Discussion and Moderated Q&A 11:30 AM BREAK and LUNCH (provided) 11:50 AM - 2:00 PM SESSION V: Film Screening: The Interrupters Shot over the course of a year, The Interrupters captures a period in Chicago when it became a national symbol for the violence in Ameri- can cities. The Interrupters tells the stories of three Violence Interrupt- ers who work for an innovative organization, CeaseFire, which uses a public health model to stop the cycle of violence in neighborhoods and communities. The Violence Interrupters, who have credibility because of their own personal histories, intervene in conflicts before they ex- plode into violence. Note: This film contains scenes of violence and adult language. 11:50 AM Overview Brian Flynn, Uniformed Services University School of Medicine 12:10 PM Screening 2:15 PM BREAK 2:35 PM - 3:10 PM SECTION VI: Scaling Up or Translating Programs to Interrupt the Contagion of Violence Following the film, a panel of speakers will share experiences with interruption in various settings, from the community to health care settings to elsewhere. Speakers will offer thoughts on how violence can be interrupted, and how programs using the interruption mechanism can be scaled up or translated.

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APPENDIX A 153 Facilitators: Brian Flynn, Uniformed Services University School of Medicine Charlotte Watts, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 2:35 PM Overview Charlotte Watts, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 2:40 PM Panel The Experience of Interruption Tio Hardiman, CeaseFire Illinois School-Based Violence and Interruption Patrick Burton, Center for Justice and Crime Prevention, South Africa Hospitals and Interruption John A. Rich, Drexel University, Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice Interrupting Family Violence Valerie Maholmes, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development 3:10 PM Facilitated Panel Discussion 3:30 PM Moderated Q&A 4:00 PM ADJOURN DAY 2