D

Biographies of Committee Members

PAUL McMANAMON, Co-Chair, is a consultant at Exciting Technology, LLC, and is half-time technical director for the Ladar and Optical Communications Institute (LOCI) at the University of Dayton. Dr. McManamon had been a member of the scientific and technical cadre of senior executives in the Sensors Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, before becoming chief scientist of the directorate. The Sensors Directorate consisted at that time of approximately 1,100 people. It is responsible for developing new sensor technology for the Air Force. Dr. McManamon was responsible for the directorate’s technical portfolio. He served 32 months as acting chief scientist for avionics for the Avionics Directorate in Wright Laboratory. He was the technical lead for more than 500 scientists and engineers, and he was responsible for the technical content of all electro-optical and microwave sensor development, electron device development, and automatic target recognition as well as avionics systems, concepts, and simulation. Prior to serving in that position, he had been the Sensor Directorate’s senior scientist for infrared sensors, developing multidiscriminate electro-optical sensors, including multifunction laser radar technology, novel electro-optical countermeasure systems, and optical phased-array beam steering technology. Dr. McManamon is widely recognized in the electro-optical community and was elected as the 2006 president of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, of which he is also a fellow. He is a member of the executive board and a fellow of the Military Sensing Symposia, a fellow of the Air Force Research Laboratory, a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a fellow the Optical Society of America.



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D Biographies of Committee Members PAUL McMANAMON, Co-Chair, is a consultant at Exciting Technology, LLC, and is half-time technical director for the Ladar and Optical Communications Institute (LOCI) at the University of Dayton. Dr. McManamon had been a member of the scientific and technical cadre of senior executives in the Sensors Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, before becom- ing chief scientist of the directorate. The Sensors Directorate consisted at that time of approximately 1,100 people. It is responsible for developing new sensor technology for the Air Force. Dr. McManamon was responsible for the directorate’s technical portfolio. He served 32 months as acting chief scientist for avionics for the Avionics Directorate in Wright Laboratory. He was the technical lead for more than 500 scientists and engineers, and he was responsible for the technical content of all electro-optical and microwave sensor development, electron device develop- ment, and automatic target recognition as well as avionics systems, concepts, and simulation. Prior to serving in that position, he had been the Sensor Directorate’s senior scientist for infrared sensors, developing multidiscriminate electro-optical sensors, including multifunction laser radar technology, novel electro-optical coun- termeasure systems, and optical phased-array beam steering technology. Dr. Mc- Manamon is widely recognized in the electro-optical community and was elected as the 2006 president of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, of which he is also a fellow. He is a member of the executive board and a fellow of the Military Sensing Symposia, a fellow of the Air Force Research Laboratory, a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a fellow the Optical Society of America. 331

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332 Optics and Photonics: Essential Technologies for O u r N at i o n ALAN E. WILLNER, Co-Chair, is currently the Steven and Kathryn Sample Chaired Professor of Engineering in the Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, Viterbi School of Engineering, University of Southern California (USC). Professor Willner received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Columbia University, in 1988 and an Honorary Doctorate from Yeshiva University in 2012. He was a post- doctoral member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories and a member of the technical staff at Bellcore. At USC, he is the associate director of the Center for Photonics Technology and was an associate director for student affairs for the Na- tional Science Foundation Engineering Research Center in Multimedia. Professor Willner is a member of the Defense Sciences Research Council, has served on many scientific advisory boards for small companies, and has advised several venture capital firms. Professor Willner has received the following honors/awards: Interna- tional Fellow of the U.K. Royal Academy of Engineering, Presidential Faculty Fel- lows Award from the White House, Packard Foundation Fellowship, Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, National Science Foundation National Young Investigator Award, Fulbright Foundation Senior Scholar Fellowship, Optical Society of Amer- ica (OSA) Forman Engineering Excellence Award, Institute of Electrical and Elec- tronics Engineers (IEEE) Photonics Society Engineering Achievement Award, OSA Leadership Award, and 2001 Eddy Paper Award from Pennwell Publications for the Best Contributed Technical Article. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, IEEE, OSA, and SPIE. He was an invited foreign dig- nitary representing the sciences for the 2009 Nobel Prize Ceremonies in Stockholm. His professional activities have included serving as president of the IEEE Photonics Society (formerly the Lasers and Electro-Optics Society, or LEOS), co-chair of the Science and Engineering Council of the OSA, vice president for technical affairs of IEEE Photonics Society, Photonics Division chair of OSA, editor-in-chief of the OSA Optics Letters, editor-in-chief of IEEE/OSA Journal of Lightwave Technology, editor-in-chief of IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, chair of the IEEE TAB Ethics and Member Conduct Committee, and general and program co-chair of the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics. Professor Willner has 975 publications, including 1 book, 24 U.S. patents, 18 keynote or plenary talks, and 16 book chapters. His research is in optical communications, optical signal processing and networks, fiber optics, and optical technologies. ROD C. ALFERNESS (NAE) is the dean of engineering at the University of Cali- fornia at Santa Barbara. Prior to this position, he was the chief scientist at Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent. His previous positions were with the Bell Laboratories as the research senior vice president and the optical networking research senior vice president. Dr. Alferness also was the chief technical officer and advanced tech- nology and architecture vice president of the Optical Networking Group, Lucent Technologies. Prior to that role, he was head of the Photonics Networks Research

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A pp e n d i x D 333 Department of Lucent Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, New Jersey. Dr. Alferness joined Bell Labs in 1976 after receiving a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Michi- gan, where his thesis research, under the supervision of Professor Emmett Leith, concerned optical propagation in volume holograms. His early research at Bell Labs included the demonstration of novel waveguide electro-optic devices and cir- cuits—including switch/modulators, polarization controllers, tunable filters—and their applications in high-capacity light wave transmission and switching systems. This research led to the early development of titanium-diffused lithium niobate waveguide modulators that are now deployed as the high-speed signal-encoding engine in fiber-optic transmission systems around the world. Dr. Alferness has also made contributions in photonic integrated circuits in indium phosphide, including widely tunable lasers, as well as in photonic switching systems and reconfigurable wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) optical networks. In the mid-1990s, he was an originator of and the Bell Labs program manager for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency-funded MONET project, which demonstrated the feasi- bility of wavelength-routed optical networks that are now being implemented for both backbone and metro networks. Dr. Alferness has authored more than 100 papers, 5 book chapters, and 35 patents. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Lasers and Electro-Optics Society (LEOS). Dr. Alferness received the 2005 IEEE Photonics Award. He has served as an elected member of the LEOS Administrative Committee and was the president of IEEE LEOS in 1997. He was general co-chair of the 1994 Optical Fiber Communica- tions Conference. Dr. Alferness has served as associate editor for Optics Letters and for Photonics Technology Letters. He has served on many IEEE and OSA committees, including fellows and awards committees. He also currently serves on the European Conference on Optical Communication Executive Management Committee. He served as the editor-in-chief of the IEEE and OSA-sponsored Journal of Lightwave Technology from 1995 to 2000. He served as an elected member of the OSA board of directors from 2001 to 2003. THOMAS M. BAER is the executive director of the Stanford Photonics Research Center and a member of the Applied Physics Department at Stanford University. His current research is focused on developing imaging and analysis technology for exploring the molecular basis of developmental biology and neuroscience. From 1996 to 2005, Dr. Baer was the chief executive officer and chair of Arcturus Biosci- ence, Inc., a biotechnology company located in Mountain View, California, that he established in 1996. Arcturus Bioscience pioneered the area of microgenom- ics. Prior to establishing Arcturus, Dr. Baer was the vice president of research at Biometric Imaging. From 1981 to 1992, he was at Spectra-Physics, Inc., where he

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334 Optics and Photonics: Essential Technologies for O u r N at i o n held positions as vice president of research and Spectra-Physics Fellow. While Dr. Baer was at Spectra-Physics, his research focused on ultrafast lasers, optical pulse compression, diode-pumped solid-state lasers, and nonlinear optics. He has made major contributions in the areas of biotechnology, quantum electronics, and laser applications and is listed as an inventor on 60 patents and is a co-author on many peer-reviewed publications in a number of scientific fields. His commercial prod- ucts have received many industry awards for design innovation. Co-founder of four companies in Silicon Valley, he was named entrepreneur of the year for emerging companies in Silicon Valley in 2000 by the Silicon Valley Business Journal. He gradu- ated with a B.A. degree in physics (magna cum laude) from Lawrence University and received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in atomic physics from the University of Chicago. He is also an alumnus of the Harvard Business School, and in 1994 he received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Lawrence University. He has been elected fellow in two international scientific societies—the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Optical Society of America (OSA)—and served as the president of the OSA in 2009. JOSEPH BUCK is the vice president of program development at Boulder Nonlinear Systems, Inc. He is currently focused on integrating nonmechanical beam control capabilities into optical communications and ladar remote sensing and imaging systems. His work spans Department of Defense, academic, and commercial appli- cations and markets. He has led cross-disciplinary teams to develop multifunction ladar sensors for three-dimensional imaging, vibrometry, polarimetry, and optical aperture synthesis for both ground and flight systems. Dr. Buck has also extensively studied the limits of both coherent and direct detection theory as applied to com- munications, imaging, and remote sensing systems. He earned his Ph.D. in phys- ics from the California Institute of Technology, where he conducted experiments on the physics of individual atom-photon interactions using trapped atoms and high-finesse cavities and carried out research in the areas of quantum information processing as applied to communication protocols. Dr. Buck began his career with the Aerospace Corporation, where he was a member of the team that pioneered some of the early demonstrations of optical aperture synthesis, and he led efforts to combine optical aperture synthesis and laser vibrometry. He then joined Lock- heed Martin Coherent Technologies, where he became a principal research scientist leading teams that developed several new remote sensing systems. Dr. Buck is cur- rently serving on the Active Optical Sensing Committee for the Optical Society of America (OSA) Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics. He is a lifetime member of the OSA; the American Physical Society; and SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering; and a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Photonics Society (formerly LEOS).

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A pp e n d i x D 335 MILTON M.T. CHANG is managing director of Incubic Management, LLC. Dr. Chang, who has an exceptional investment track record, founded Incubic to in- stitutionalize this approach in a venture capital and management advisory firm. He personally built Newport Corporation and New Focus, Inc., to successful initial public offering, as chief executive officer, and has provided the first capital to more than a dozen high-tech start-up companies, all of which were successful. Having been an entrepreneur, he is helpful to other entrepreneurs—his operating principle is fairness—he is effective as a sounding board for providing advice to entrepreneurs. Dr. Chang is active in the technical and business community and has received a number of prestigious awards from professional societies. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Optical Society of America, and the Laser Institute of America (LIA), and a former presi- dent of the IEEE Photonics Society and the LIA. He is well known for sharing his experience freely and writes monthly business columns for Laser Focus World and contributes articles to Photonics Spectra. He earned a B.S. in electrical engineering with highest honors from the University of Illinois and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and completed the Harvard Owner/President Management Program. He has received the Distinguished Alumni Award from both the University of Illinois and Caltech and is a member of the board of trustees of Caltech and an Overseer of the Hun- tington Library. CONSTANCE CHANG-HASNAIN is the John R. Whinnery Chair Professor for the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department, University of Califor- nia, Berkeley. Professor Chang-Hasnain received her Ph.D. degree from the same department in 1987. Prior to joining the Berkeley faculty, she was a member of the technical staff at Bellcore (1987-1992) and an assistant professor of electrical engineering at Stanford University (1992-1996). She currently serves as chair of the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Graduate Group. She is also an honorary member of the A.F. Loffe Institute (Russia), Chang Jiang Scholar Endowed Chair at Tsinghua University (China), and Visiting Professor of Peking University (China) and National Jiao Tung University (Taiwan). Professor Chang-Hasnain’s research interests range from devices to materials and physics, particularly focusing on new optical structures and materials for integrated optoelectronics. Most recently, she and her students achieved groundbreaking results of nanolasers on metal oxide semiconductor-silicon based on their discovery of a brand new nanomate- rial growth mode. Professor Chang-Hasnain is recognized by the international scientific community with awards such as the IEEE David Sarnoff Award 2011 for pioneering contributions to vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) arrays and tunable VCSELs; the Optical Society of America (OSA) Nick Holonyak, Jr., Award, 2007, for significant contributions to VCSEL arrays, injection locking, and

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336 Optics and Photonics: Essential Technologies for O u r N at i o n slow light; and the Japan Society of Applied Physics Micro-optics Award, 2009, for distinguished works and contributions to the development and promotion of micro-optics technologies. She received the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, 2009; Humboldt Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung Foundation, 2009; and the Chang Jiang Scholar Endowed Chair Award from the People’s Republic of China, 2009. She was also awarded the National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship, one of the most prestigious faculty fellowships, by the Department of Defense. CHARLES M. FALCO is the chair of Condensed Matter Physics, professor of optical sciences, and professor of physics at the University of Arizona. Dr. Falco has been a professor of optical sciences since 1992, with a joint appointment in physics. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Optical Society of America, and SPIE, and he served two year terms (1992-1993) as councilor of the APS and member of the Executive Committee of the Division of Condensed Matter Physics of the APS and 4 years (1994-1998) as secretary/treasurer of the Forum on International Physics of the APS. Dr. Falco’s principal research interests are the growth (by molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering), structure (using a wide range of probes, including x-ray and electron diffraction, in situ and ex situ surface probes, electron microscopy, scanning ­ probe microscopies, etc.), and studies of the physical properties of ­ etallic super- m lattices and ultrathin films, including research on magnetism, super­ onductivity, c x-ray optics, elastic properties, and nucleation and epitaxy of thin films, as well as computerized image analysis. He has authored or co-authored more than 250 p ­ apers and six book chapters, holds six U.S. patents, and co-edited two books; he has given more than 150 invited talks at conferences in 24 countries and more than 200 seminars at universities and research institutions in 15 countries. ERICA R.H. FUCHS is an assistant professor in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Her research focuses on the role of government in technology development and the effect of location on the competitiveness of new technologies. In 2008 she received the Oak Ridge Associated Universities Junior Faculty Enhancement Fellowship for her research on the impact of offshoring on technology directions, and in 2011 she received a National Science Foundation CAREER award for her research rethinking national innovation systems. During 2011, she played a growing role in national meetings on the future of U.S. advanced manufacturing. Before joining the faculty at CMU, Dr. Fuchs completed her Ph.D. in engineering systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in June 2006. She also received her master’s and her bachelor’s degrees from MIT in technology policy (2003) and materials science and engineer- ing (1999), respectively. Prior to graduate school, Dr. Fuchs spent 1999-2000 as a

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A pp e n d i x D 337 fellow at the United Nations in Beijing, China. There, she conducted research at state-owned industrial boiler manufacturers on policies to encourage innovation. Her work has been published in High Temperature Materials and Processes, Journal of Lightwave Technology, Composite Science and Technology, International Journal of Vehicle Design, Issues in Science and Technology, Research Policy, and Management Science. Dr. Fuchs has been an invited speaker at a wide range of venues, including the United Nations Industrial Development Organization, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship, and the Council on Foreign Relations. WAGUIH S. ISHAK, Alternate Co-Chair, is the division vice president and director of the Corning West Technology Center, Corning Incorporated. Dr. Ishak’s M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering were awarded by McMaster University, Ontario, Canada, in 1975 and 1978, respectively. In 1999, Dr. Ishak completed the Stanford Executive Program at Stanford University. In 1987, he became the man- ager of the Photonics Technology Department of the Instruments and Photonics Laboratory at Hewlett-Packard, which is responsible for research and development (R&D) programs in fiber optics, integrated optics, optoelectronics, micro-optics, and optical interconnects for applications in measurements. In 1995, he was pro- moted to the position of director of the communications and optics research laboratory. Dr. Ishak led his R&D team in the areas of photonics (fiber optics, integrated optics, optoelectronics, and micro-optics) and integrated electronics. In 2003, he became the director of the Photonics and Electronics Research Lab at Agi- lent Labs, responsible for the R&D programs in photonics, high-speed electronics, sensors, semiconductor testing, wireless communications, and consumer electron- ics. In 2005, he became the vice president and chief technology officer at Avago Technologies. Dr. Ishak managed the company’s U.S. Advanced R&D Center and was responsible for creating technologies for its Electronic Components Business Unit. In 2007, he joined Corning Incorporated. As the division vice president and director of the Corning West Technology Center, he manages a team of scientists in developing applications for Corning’s glass and fiber technologies and conduct- ing state-of-the-art research in the areas of microstructures and nanotechnology. Dr. Ishak has 7 patents, 2 book chapters, and 75 publications and is currently a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and chair of the board-elect of Optoelectronics Industry. PREM KUMAR is the AT&T Professor of Information Technology for the Electri- cal Engineering and Computer Science Department at Northwestern University. Professor Kumar is also the director of the Center for Photonic Communication and Computing and a professor of physics and astronomy. He received his Ph.D. in 1980 in physics from the State University of New York, Buffalo, and joined

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338 Optics and Photonics: Essential Technologies for O u r N at i o n Northwestern in 1986 after spending 5 years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His publications include 1 edited book, 1 book chapter, 6 patents, 180 peer-reviewed journal papers, 45 proceedings articles, and 300 (90 invited) confer- ence papers. His research focuses on photonic devices and applications utilizing the principles of nonlinear and quantum optics. Current development areas in which he is involved include generation, distribution, and ultrafast processing of quantum entanglement for cryptography and computing; novel optical amplifiers and devices for networked communications; and novel quantum light states for precision measurements and quantum imaging and sensing. He is a fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA), the American Physical Society (APS), the Insti- tute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Institute of Physics (United Kingdom), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering. In 2006 he received the Martin E. and Gertrude G. Walder Research Excellence Award from Northwestern University. In 2004 he received the Fifth International Quantum Communication Award from Tamagawa University, Tokyo, Japan. He has been a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Photonics Society (2008-2010). He is active in professional societies (OSA, IEEE, APS, SPIE, and AAAS) in various roles including the fol- lowing: OSA Long-Term Planning Group (2008-2010); general (program) chair, Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference 2008 (2006); chair, Steering Committee, International Conference on Quantum Communication, Measure- ment, and Computing (Brisbane, Australia, 2010; Calgary, Alberta, Canada, 2008; Tsukuba City, Japan, 2006; Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2002; Evanston, Illinois, 1998, principal organizer). He is the founder and managing partner of NuCrypt, LLC, in Evanston, Illinois. DAVID A.B. MILLER (NAS, NAE) is the W.M. Keck Professor of Electrical En- gineering, a Professor by Courtesy of Applied Physics, and a co-director of the Stanford Photonics Research Center at Stanford University. Dr. Miller received his B.Sc. from St. Andrews University, Scotland, and, in 1979, the Ph.D. from Heriot- Watt University, both in physics. He was with Bell Laboratories from 1981 to 1996, as a department head from 1987, and in latter years of the period as head of the Advanced Photonics Research Department. He has served as director of the Ginz- ton Laboratory and of the Solid State and Photonics Laboratory at Stanford. His research interests include physics and devices in nanophotonics, nanometallics, and quantum-well optoelectronics, and fundamentals and applications of optics in information sensing, switching, and processing. He has published more than 230 scientific papers, holds 69 patents, and is the author of Quantum Mechanics for Scientists and Engineers (Cambridge, 2008). Dr. Miller has served as a board member for both the Optical Society of America (OSA) and the Institute of Elec- trical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Lasers and Electro-Optics Society (LEOS),

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A pp e n d i x D 339 and on various other society and conference committees. He was president of the IEEE LEOS in 1995. He has also served on boards for various photonics com- panies and on the Defense Sciences Research Council for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. He was awarded the Adolph Lomb Medal and the R.W. Wood Prize from the OSA, the International Prize in Optics from the International Commission for Optics, and the IEEE Third Millennium Medal. He is a fellow of OSA, IEEE, the American Physical Society, the Royal Society, and the Royal Society of Edinburgh; holds honorary doctorates from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel and Heriot-Watt University; and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. DUNCAN T. MOORE (NAE) is the Rudolf and Hilda Kingslake Professor of Opti- cal Engineering and Professor of Biomedical Engineering, as well as professor of business administration in the William E. Simon Graduate School of Business Ad- ministration at the University of Rochester. In 2006, he was also appointed director for entrepreneurship at the university, and in 2007 he became the vice provost for entrepreneurship. From 2004 until 2009, he was responsible for the $3.6 million Kauffman grant on entrepreneurship with a $7.2 million matching grant from the University of Rochester. The Ph.D. degree in optics was awarded to Dr. Moore in 1974 from the University of Rochester. He had previously earned a master’s degree in optics at Rochester and a bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Maine. Dr. Moore has extensive experience in the academic, research, business, and government arenas of science and technology. He is an expert in gradient-index optics, computer-aided design, and the manufacture of optical systems. He has been a thesis advisor for more than 50 graduate students. In 1993, he began a 1-year appointment as science adviser to Senator John D. Rockefeller IV of West Virginia. Dr. Moore was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in February 1998. His major areas of research are in gradient-index materials, computer-aided de- sign (including design for manufacturing methods), the manufacture of optical systems, medical optics (especially optics for minimally invasive surgery), and optical instrumentation. His most recent Ph.D. thesis topics as a thesis adviser for graduate students have been very high efficiency solar cells, polymer gradient index optics, a built-in accommodation system for the eye, terahertz imaging, generalized three-dimensional index gradients, single-point diamond turning of glass, design methods for gradient-index imaging systems, the effect of diffusion chemistry on gradient-index profiles formed by means of sol-gel techniques, quantitative phase imaging in scanning optical microscopy, integration of the design and manufac- ture of gradient-index optical systems, and interferometric characterization of the chromatic dispersion of gradient-index glasses. DAVID C. MOWERY is William A. and Betty H. Hasler Professor of New Enter- prise Development at the Walter A. Haas School of Business at the University of

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340 Optics and Photonics: Essential Technologies for O u r N at i o n California, Berkeley, and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received his undergraduate and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Stanford University and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Business School. Dr. Mowery taught at Carnegie Mellon University, served as the study director for the Panel on Technology and Employment of the National Academy of Sciences, and served in the Office of the United States Trade Representative as a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow. He has been a member of a num- ber of National Research Council committees. In 2003-2004, he was the Marvin Bower Research Fellow at the Harvard Business School. His research deals with the economics of technological innovation and with the effects of public poli- cies on innovation; he has testified before congressional committees and served as an adviser for the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, various federal agencies, and industrial firms. Dr. Mowery has published numer- ous academic papers and has written or edited a number of books, including the Oxford Handbook of Innovation; Innovation, Path Dependency, and Policy: The Norwegian Case; Innovation in Global Industries; Ivory Tower and Industrial Inno- vation: University-Industry Technology Transfer Before and After the Bayh-Dole Act; Paths of Innovation: Technological Change in 20th-Century America; The Interna- tional Computer Software Industry: A Comparative Study of Industry Evolution and Structure; U.S. Industry in 2000: Studies in Competitive Performance; The Sources of Industrial Leadership: Studies of Seven Industries; Science and Technology Policy in Interdependent Economies; Technology and the Pursuit of Economic Growth; Alliance Politics and Economics: Multinational Joint Ventures in Commercial Aircraft; Tech- nology and Employment: Innovation and Growth in the U.S. Economy; The Impact of Technological Change on Employment and Economic Growth; Technology and the Wealth of Nations; and International Collaborative Ventures in U.S. Manufacturing. His academic awards include the Raymond Vernon Prize from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, the Economic History Association’s Fritz Redlich Prize, the Business History Review’s Newcomen Prize, and the Cheit Outstanding Teaching Award. N. DARIUS SANKEY is a currently a portfolio director for Central Portfolio Management at Intellectual Ventures, where he participates in developing intel- lectual property investment strategies for the firm. Dr. Sankey had recently served as managing director at Zone Ventures, an affiliate venture capital fund of Draper Fisher Jurvetson based in Los Angeles. Dr. Sankey led the Zone Ventures technol- ogy assessment efforts and oversaw its portfolio investments for more than 8 years, serving as a board member for several companies including Siimpel Corporation, Lumexis, Inc., and Microfabrica and Neven Vision (acquired by Google). He has led several transactions in the microelectronics, wireless telecommunications, media and entertainment, and business and consumer software sectors. Dr. Sankey has a strong interest in strategizing market applications for basic science research on the

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A pp e n d i x D 341 university level. This interest has also led him to a position as a visiting professor at the Rady School of Business Management at the University of California, San Diego. Before his tenure at Zone Ventures, Dr. Sankey worked as a management consultant at McKinsey & Company, Inc., and held strategic planning, consulting, and research and development positions at the RAND Corporation and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Sankey holds a B.S. in physics and electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in optical engineering from the Institute of Optics, University of Rochester. EDWARD WHITE, the president of Edward White Consulting and a native of New York State, began his career at Kodak after earning a B.S. degree in mechani- cal engineering from the University of Rochester. He later earned an Executive M.B.A., also from the University of Rochester. At Kodak, Mr. White held a variety of management positions in engineering, research and development, and the busi- ness units. As general manager of Kodak’s Optical Products Business Unit and vice president of the Commercial Imaging Group, he led an organization responsible for designing and manufacturing optical systems for Kodak products as well as for high-tech customers external to Kodak. His global organization of more than 1,800 people included engineering and manufacturing operations located in the United States, Europe, Latin America, China, Taiwan, and Japan, with sales of $100 million. After retiring from Kodak in 2009, Mr. White took an interim position as president and chief executive officer of JML Optical, a manufacturer of precision optical components and assemblies, and in 2010 he founded Edward White Consulting, LLC. His consulting business specializes in helping engineering and manufactur- ing companies solve challenging business and operational issues around the world. He is currently engaged in helping companies improve operations in the United States as well as establish new operations in China and India. Mr. White is active in his community and serves on several not-for-profit boards. He currently chairs the Rochester United Way Services Corporation Board, is a member of the Finance Committee of the Greater Rochester United Way, and is a member of Rochester’s Children’s Success Fund.