Appendix B

Speaker, Moderator, and Panelist Biographies

Roy S. Herbst, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair), is a professor of medicine and pharmacology, chief of medical oncology, director of the Thoracic Oncology Research Program, and associate director for Translational Research at Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Herbst has led the Phase I development of several targeted agents for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including gefitinib, erlotinib, and bevacizumab. He co-led the BATTLE-1 effort, and co-leads the BATTLE-2 clinical trial program and the Developmental Therapeutics Program for the Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center Support Grant. His laboratory work focuses on angiogenesis and dual EGFR/VEGFR inhibition in NSCLC. This work has been translated from the preclinical to clinical setting in multiple Phase II and III studies he has led.

Previously, Dr. Herbst served as professor and chief of the section of thoracic medical oncology in the Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology at the MD Anderson Cancer Center, and served as professor and codirector of the Phase I Program in the Department of Cancer Biology. Dr. Herbst is author or coauthor of more than 250 publications, has contributed to many prominent journals, and presented at annual meetings for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the World Conference on Lung Cancer, and others. Dr. Herbst is an active member of a number of organizations, including ASCO, AACR, the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s)



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Appendix B Speaker, Moderator, and Panelist Biographies Roy S. Herbst, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair), is a professor of medicine and phar- macology, chief of medical oncology, director of the Thoracic Oncology Research Program, and associate director for Translational Research at Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Herbst has led the Phase I development of several targeted agents for non-small- cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including gefitinib, erlotinib, and bevacizumab. He co-led the BATTLE-1 effort, and co-leads the BATTLE-2 clinical trial program and the Developmental Therapeutics Program for the Yale Com- prehensive Cancer Center Support Grant. His laboratory work focuses on angiogenesis and dual EGFR/VEGFR inhibition in NSCLC. This work has been translated from the preclinical to clinical setting in multiple Phase II and III studies he has led. Previously, Dr. Herbst served as professor and chief of the section of thoracic medical oncology in the Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology at the MD Anderson Cancer Center, and served as pro- fessor and codirector of the Phase I Program in the Department of Cancer Biology. Dr. Herbst is author or coauthor of more than 250 publications, has contributed to many prominent journals, and presented at annual meet- ings for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the World Conference on Lung Cancer, and others. Dr. Herbst is an active member of a number of orga- nizations, including ASCO, AACR, the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) 93

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94 REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY National Cancer Policy Forum, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and the South- west Oncology Group. He has served as chair and vice chair for a number of these organizations’ committees and subcommittees. Dr. Herbst is the recipient of ASCO’s Young Investigator Award and Career Development Award, as well as the MD Anderson Cancer Center Physician Scientist Pro- gram Award. His work has been funded by ASCO, AACR, the Department of Defense, and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Dr. Herbst earned his M.D. at Cornell University Medical College and his Ph.D. in Molecular Cell Biology at the Rockefeller University in New York City. His postgraduate training included an internship and residency in medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. His clinical fel- lowships in medicine and hematology were completed at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, respectively. Dr. Herbst completed his M.S. in clinical translational research at Harvard University. David B. Abrams, Ph.D., is the executive director of the Schroeder Institute for Tobacco Research and Policy Studies at Legacy and professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Georgetown University Medical Center. Dr. Abrams is a clinical health psychologist and former director of the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He has published more than 250 scholarly articles and been a principal or co-investigator on 65 grants, including an NCI Program Project award for a Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center. Dr. Abrams is lead author of The Tobacco Dependence Treatment Handbook: A Guide to Best Practices, a recipient of a book of the year award. He was a member of the Board of Scientific Advisors of NCI, and served on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Transdisciplinary Tobacco Etiology Research Network and several IOM committees. Dr. Abrams received the Joseph Cullen Memorial Award from the American Society for Preventive Oncology (ASPO) for lifetime contributions to tobacco control, and was president of the Society for Behavioral Medicine and a recipient of their Distinguished Scientist and Mentorship awards. Since 2009, he has focused on regulatory science to inform the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Center for Tobacco Products, including development of a strategic research agenda, convening expert thought lead- ers, conducting research, and providing knowledge synthesis in areas includ- ing menthol regulation, reduced harm, emerging products, and evaluation

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APPENDIX B 95 of public perceptions of FDA regulation. He holds a B.Sc. (honors) in computer science and psychology from the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, and a doctorate in clinical psychology from Rutgers University. Michele Bloch, M.D., Ph.D., is the acting chief of the NCI’s Tobacco Control Research Branch. Dr. Bloch has served as a program director in the research areas of women and tobacco, tobacco industry documents, international tobacco control and prevention, and other areas. She oversaw the successful implementation of the NCI’s Tobacco Industry Document Research Program Announcement and played a key role in developing and implementing NIH’s first research initiative devoted to international tobacco research and capacity building. Dr. Bloch’s research activities have included working with the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development’s Global Network for Women’s and Children’s Health Research to survey pregnant women’s knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure in nine low- and middle-income nations. Dr. Bloch has helped to organize numerous scien- tific meetings, including the 2008 Expert Meeting on Tobacco Exposure During Pregnancy in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Establishing Research Priorities; the 2006 NIH State of the Science Conference on Tobacco Use; the 2005–2006 meetings of the President’s Cancer Panel; and the 2004 NCI Women, Tobacco, and Cancer Working Group meeting. She also helped to develop and implement the NCI’s Smokefree Meetings Policy. She is the author of numerous publications for scientific and lay audiences. Dr. Bloch received her bachelor of science degree in biochemistry from Cornell University and received her doctor of medicine and doctor of philosophy degrees in pharmacology from the Washington University School of Medicine, where she also completed a residency in anatomic pathology. Otis Webb Brawley, M.D., FACP, is the chief medical and scientific officer and executive vice president of the American Cancer Society (ACS), where he is responsible for promoting the goals of cancer prevention, early detec- tion, and high-quality treatment through cancer research and education. He champions efforts to decrease smoking, improve diet, detect cancer at the earliest stage, and provide the critical support that cancer patients need. He guides efforts to enhance and focus the research program, upgrade ACS’s advocacy capacity, and concentrate community cancer control efforts in

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96 REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY areas where they will be most effective. As a recognized expert in health disparities research, Dr. Brawley is a key leader in ACS’s work to eliminate disparities in access to high-quality cancer care. Dr. Brawley currently serves as professor of hematology, oncology, medicine, and epidemiology at Emory University and is medical consultant to CNN. Previously, he was the medical director of the Georgia Cancer Center for Excellence at Grady Memorial Hospital and deputy director for cancer control at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University. He has served as a member of the ACS’s Prostate Cancer Committee, co-chaired the U.S. Surgeon General’s Task Force on Cancer Health Disparities, and filled numerous positions at the NCI. Dr. Brawley is a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women. Previously he was a member of the CDC Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee and the FDA’s Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee, and chaired the NIH Consensus Panel on the Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease. Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. lists Dr. Brawley as one of America’s Top Doctors for Cancer. Among numerous other awards, he was a Georgia Cancer Coalition Scholar and received the Key to St. Bernard Parish for his work in the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Dr. Brawley is a graduate of University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine. He completed his residency in internal medicine at University Hospitals of Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University, and completed an NCI Fellowship in Medical Oncology. K. Michael Cummings, M.P.H., Ph.D., recently joined the faculty of the Medical University of South Carolina after a 30-year career at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, where he directed a clinical and research center on tobacco control and oversaw the operations of the New York State Smokers Quitline. He has authored or coauthored more than 320 scientific papers, including landmark reports for the Office of the Surgeon General, the NCI, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the IOM. In the late 1990s, Dr. Cummings contributed to digitizing and publishing online previously secret internal tobacco industry documents that described how manufacturers directed their marketing to attract youthful replacement smokers and designed cigarettes in ways that made it hard for smokers to quit once they get addicted to nicotine. He received his B.S. in Health Education at Miami University (Ohio), and his M.P.H. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

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APPENDIX B 97 Lawrence R. Deyton, M.S.P.H., M.D., became the first director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) in 2009. Since his appointment, Dr. Deyton has overseen implementation and enforcement of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (TCA), including the pro- hibition on marketing tobacco products to children and adolescents; a ban on misleading descriptors (“light,” “low,” “mild”); and the law’s requirement of full disclosure of tobacco product ingredients. These achievements, com- bined with the other provisions of the TCA, represent the most far-reaching public intervention in a generation. The vision of the CTP is to help “make tobacco-related death and disease part of America’s past, not America’s future, and, by doing so, ensure a healthier life for every family.” Prior to joining the FDA, Dr. Deyton was chief public health and envi- ronmental hazards officer for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). He oversaw the VA’s public health programs, including the health of women veterans, the long-term health consequences of military service, the VA’s emergency preparation and response program, and tobacco use cessation. Previously, Dr. Deyton served for 11 years in leadership positions at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, 6 years in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and as a legislative aide with the House of Rep- resentatives Subcommittee on Health and the Environment in the 1970s. Dr. Deyton was a founder of the Whitman Walker Clinic, a community- based AIDS service organization. In 2011, Dr. Deyton was a finalist for the Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medal for his contributions to the health, safety, and well-being of Americans. He is a graduate of the University of Kansas, Harvard School of Public Health, and the George Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Deyton completed his postdoctoral medical training at the University of Southern California/Los Angeles County Medical Center. His training is in public health, internal medicine, and infectious diseases. Dr. Deyton continues to care for patients at the Washington, DC, VA Medical Center. Carolyn Dresler, M.D., M.P.A., is the medical director for the Arkansas Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Program at the Arkansas Department of Health. Previously, she was head of the Group for Tobacco and Cancer at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France. Her background includes training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in surgical oncology and the University of Toronto in thoracic and cardiac surgery (U.S. board-certified). She practiced clinical thoracic surgical oncol-

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98 REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY ogy at Washington University and Fox Chase Cancer Center. Subsequently, she was medical director for research and development for smoking control at GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare. She was a board member of the North American Quitline Consortium from 2008 to 2010; is a board member of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer; and is chair of the Tobacco Control subcommittee of the American Society for Clinical Oncology Prevention Committee. Academic interests range from the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer; nicotine addiction, particularly as it affects smoking cessation; the susceptibility of women to lung cancer; and the global issues of tobacco control, particularly using the human rights based approach. In 2002 to 2003 she completed a master’s degree in public administration at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Michael C. Fiore, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., is a professor of medicine and founding director of the University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention (UW-CTRI). As a general internist and preven- tive medicine specialist, he treats patients for tobacco dependence. Dr. Fiore chaired the PHS’s Clinical Practice Guideline, Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence, updated in 2008 and endorsed by 58 medical and public health organizations. He also chaired the HHS Subcommittee on Tobacco Cessa- tion, which produced a comprehensive plan for promoting tobacco cessa- tion. He is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including Bowdoin College’s Common Good Award. The U.S. Department of Justice, as part of its landmark lawsuit against the tobacco industry, asked Dr. Fiore to craft a $130 billion, 25-year plan to assist 33 million smokers to quit. Dr. Fiore’s chief research and policy contributions focus on strategies to intervene with patients who use tobacco. He spearheaded the concept of expanding vital signs to include tobacco use status. Dr. Fiore has served as principal investigator and co-principal investigator for two NIH Transdisci- plinary Tobacco Use Research Center grants, and is the principal investiga- tor for the UW-CTRI NIH/NCI P50 grant. Dr. Fiore is a graduate of Bowdoin College and Northwestern Univer- sity’s Medical School, completing his Internal Medicine training at Boston City Hospital. He received an M.P.H. from Harvard University and an M.B.A. from the University of Wisconsin School of Business. Dr. Fiore received training as an epidemic intelligence service officer at the CDC, where he also completed a preventive medicine residency program at the Office on Smoking and Health.

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APPENDIX B 99 Geoffrey T. Fong, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology and of public health and health systems at the University of Waterloo, and the founder and chief principal investigator of the ITC Project. The ITC Project conducts large- scale longitudinal cohort surveys in each country to evaluate the impact of tobacco control policies of the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, such as pictorial health warnings, smoke- free laws, increases in tobacco taxes, and marketing bans. Dr. Fong is the recipient of a senior investigator award (2007–2017) from the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research; an inaugural recipient in 2009 (with two colleagues) of the Top Canadian Achievement in Health Research Award from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) and the Cana- dian Medical Association Journal; and a 5-year Prevention Scientist Award (2011–2016) from the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute. Dr. Fong received the 2011 CIHR Knowledge Translation Award for his work in disseminating ITC findings to governments, researchers, and advocates throughout the world. In 2012, Dr. Fong and two colleagues received the Lise Manchester Award from the Statistical Society of Canada, which rec- ognizes excellence in state-of-the-art statistical work that considers problems of public interest. He received his B.A. in psychology from Stanford Uni- versity and his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Michigan. Ellen R. Gritz, Ph.D., is professor and chair of the department of behav- ioral science and Olla S. Stribling Distinguished Chair for Cancer Research at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She is an estab- lished leader in cancer prevention and control research and an internation- ally known investigator. Dr. Gritz has published extensively on cigarette smoking behavior: prevention, cessation, pharmacologic mechanisms, and special issues of concern to women and high-risk groups, including ethnic minorities, youth, cancer patients, and persons living with HIV/ AIDS. Dr. Gritz is currently principal investigator of an NCI R01 grant evaluating an innovative, cell phone-based smoking cessation intervention for a high-risk, medically underserved population with elevated smoking prevalence. Other research includes skin cancer prevention in children and high-risk individuals, genetic testing and counseling for hereditary cancers, and cancer survivorship. Dr. Gritz has served on advisory boards of numerous agencies, organi- zations, and comprehensive cancer centers, and is a member of the AACR Task Force on Tobacco and Cancer. She is a member of the IOM and the Academy of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas. Dr. Gritz was

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100 REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY a member of the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Board and the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. Dr. Gritz has also served as vice chair on the Board of Directors of the American Legacy Foundation. In addition, Dr. Gritz served as president of the Society for Research in Nicotine and Tobacco and president of the ASPO. Dr. Gritz has received numerous awards, including the ASPO’s Joseph W. Cullen Memorial Award and the Distinguished Achievement Award; MD Anderson’s Margaret and James A. Elkins, Jr., Faculty Achievement Award in Cancer Prevention; the Business and Professional Women’s Clubs Texas Award; the Alma Dea Morani, M.D. Renaissance Woman Award; and the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Cancer Special Interest Group’s Out- standing Biobehavioral Oncology Award. In 2009, Dr. Gritz received the Distinguished Professional Woman’s Award, presented by the Committee on the Status of Women at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. She is a fellow of the Society of Behavioral Medicine and the American Psychological Association, and is senior editor for the Behavioral Sciences section of the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Preven- tion. Dr. Gritz’s bibliography lists more than 270 publications. She received her B.A. in psychology from Columbia University and her Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego. David Hammond, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the School of Public Health & Health Systems at the University of Waterloo. Dr. Hammond’s research focuses on population-level interventions to reduce chronic disease, with a focus on tobacco control policy in the areas of health communica- tions, packaging, and product regulation, as well as nutritional labeling and obesity prevention. Dr. Hammond works closely with governments around the world and has served as a WHO advisor for health warnings and tobacco labeling policy. He recently received the Canada’s Premier Young Researcher Award from the CIHR and is a past recipient of the Cana- dian Medical Association Journal ’s Top Canadian Achievements in Health Research Awards for his work with Geoffrey Fong and Mary Thompson as part of the International Tobacco Control Policy project, conducted in more than a dozen low- and middle-income countries. He received his B.A. in psychology from the University of British Columbia and M.Sc. in health studies and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Waterloo. Cheryl Healton, Ph.D., is the founding president and chief executive officer of Legacy and has worked to further the foundation’s ambitious mis-

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APPENDIX B 101 sion: to build a world where young people reject tobacco and anyone can quit. During her tenure, she has guided the national youth tobacco preven- tion countermarketing campaign, truth®, which has been credited in part with reducing youth smoking prevalence to near record lows. Under her leadership, Legacy has undertaken numerous public education campaigns, research, technical assistance, and a broad program of grantmaking. She is a frequent commentator for national and local media coverage of tobacco control issues, appearing on ABC’s Good Morning America; CNN’s Larry King Live; NBC’s Today; MSNBC’s Hardball with Chris Matthews; National Public Radio; and more. She joined the American Legacy Foundation from Columbia Univer- sity’s Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health, where she served as chair of the division of socio-medical sciences and associate dean for program development. Dr. Healton’s involvement with Columbia University spans three decades, during which she has served in a variety of administrative and faculty roles at the medical center and in public health, including associate dean of the Medical School. Dr. Healton holds a doctorate from Columbia University’s School of Public Health (with distinction) and an M.P.A. from New York University for Health Policy and Planning.  Richard D. Hurt, M.D., joined the faculty of the Mayo Clinic in the division of community internal medicine in 1976. He served as division chair from 1987 to1997 and rose to the rank of professor of medicine in 1995. Dr. Hurt was the first witness for the state in the historic Minnesota Tobacco Trial, the case that transformed global tobacco control. Dr. Hurt is director of the Nicotine Dependence Center, which he helped found in 1988. The center’s treatment program staff have treated more than 50,000 patients, with services ranging from individual counseling to an intensive residential treatment program. Through its education program, services are provided for a range of learners, including training and certi- fication for tobacco treatment specialists, the annual conference for health care providers, and most recently as the chair of a new initiative called Global Bridges: Healthcare Alliance for Tobacco Dependence Treatment. The research program staff has conducted scores of research projects. Dr. Hurt is author or coauthor of more than 200 scientific publications. He received his M.D. from the University of Louisville (Alumnus Alpha Omega Alpha Award, 2008) and completed his internal medicine fellow- ship at Mayo Clinic.

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102 REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY Fadlo R. Khuri, M.D., FACP, is professor and chair of hematology and medical oncology at Emory University, the deputy director for the Winship Cancer Institute, and the Roberto C. Goizueta Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research. He has been the recipient of an ACS Career Development Award, numerous Department of Defense and NIH/NCI grants, as well as funding from the state of Georgia. Dr. Khuri is principal investigator of the NCI-funded Emory Lung Cancer Program Project Grant (Haian Fu, co-principal investigator), and is co-principal investigator of the Emory Head and Neck SPORE grant. He has been honored by induction into the American Society of Clinical Investigation, inclusion in America’s Top Doctors for Cancer, receipt of the Naji Sahyoun Memorial Award from the Middle East Medical Assembly, and receipt of the Waun Ki Hong Award from the MD Anderson Cancer Center. He has been named a Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Scholar every year since 2003. He is an active member of the AACR, the ASCO, the American Society for Clini- cal Investigation, and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Dr. Khuri has authored more than 200 articles for peer-reviewed journals. He has served on the editorial boards for Cancer, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, and American Journal of Clinical Oncol- ogy, and was named editor-in-chief of Cancer in 2011. Dr. Khuri received his B.S. in biology from the Yale University and his M.D. from Columbia University. He completed his internship/residency at Boston City Hospital, and a fellowship in hematology and medical oncology at Tufts University/ New England Medical Center. After his fellowship, he began his career in the department of thoracic/head and neck medical oncology at MD Ander- son Cancer Center. Howard K. Koh, M.D., M.P.H., serves as the 14th Assistant Secretary for Health for HHS, after being nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in 2009. Dr. Koh oversees 14 core public health offices, including the Office of the Surgeon General and the PHS Commissioned Corps, 10 regional health offices across the nation, and 10 presidential and secretarial advisory committees. He also serves as senior public health advisor to the Secretary. The Office of Assistant Secretary for Health implements an array of interdisciplinary programs relating to disease prevention, health promotion, the reduction of health disparities, women’s and minority health, adolescent health, HIV/AIDS and chronic infectious diseases, vaccine programs, fitness, sports and nutrition, bioeth- ics, population affairs, blood supply, research integrity, and human research

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APPENDIX B 103 protections. As the assistant secretary for health, Dr. Koh is dedicated to the mission of creating better public health systems for prevention and care so that all people can reach their highest attainable standard of health. Dr. Koh previously served as the Harvey V. Fineberg Professor of the Practice of Public Health and associate dean for public health practice at the Harvard School of Public Health. He was also director of the Harvard School of Public Health Center for Public Health Preparedness. He has published more than 200 articles in the medical and public health literature in areas such as disparities, cancer control, melanoma and skin oncology, tobacco control, public health preparedness, disease prevention and health promotion, and public health leadership. Dr. Koh served as commissioner of Public Health for the Common- wealth of Massachusetts (1997–2003) after being appointed by Governor William Weld. As commissioner, Dr. Koh led the Massachusetts Depart- ment of Public Health, which included a wide range of health services, 4 hospitals, and a staff of more than 3,000 professionals. In this capacity, he emphasized the power of prevention and strengthened the state’s commit- ment to eliminating health disparities. During his service, the state had advances in areas such as tobacco control, cancer screening, bioterrorism response after 9/11 and anthrax, health issues of the homeless, newborn screening, organ donation, suicide prevention, and international public health partnerships. At Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health, he was professor of dermatology, medicine, and public health, as well as director of cancer prevention and control. He has earned numerous awards and honors for interdisciplinary accomplishments in medicine and public health, including the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Award for National Service, the Distinguished Ser- vice Award from the ACS, and the Drs. Jack E. White/LaSalle D. Leffall Cancer Prevention Award from the AACR and the Intercultural Cancer Council. He is an elected member of the IOM. President Clinton appointed Dr. Koh as a member of the National Cancer Advisory Board (2000–2002). A past chair of the Massachusetts Coalition for a Health Future (the group that pushed for the Commonwealth’s groundbreaking tobacco control ini- tiative), Dr. Koh was named by the New England Division of the American Cancer Society as “one of the most influential persons in the fight against tobacco during the last 25 years.” He was named to the K100 (the 100 leading Korean Americans in the first century of Korean immigration to the United States), and has received the Boston University Distinguished Alumnus Award, as well as honorary degrees from Merrimack College and

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106 REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY states as they design and implement comprehensive tobacco prevention programs and pursue tobacco policy change. In this role, he and his depart- ment have developed numerous materials on the need for these programs and policies, as well as on their key components and effectiveness. In addi- tion to consulting with state advocates and health departments on these issues, he has provided testimony in state legislatures and public hearings and appears often in the media. Now in his 16th year with the campaign, Mr. McGoldrick has more than 25 years of experience conducting market- ing and communications research. He received a B.A. in political science from the University of Georgia and an M.A., also in political science, from Michigan State University. John Mendelsohn, M.D., was president of the MD Anderson Cancer Cen- ter from 1996 until 2011. Under his direction, MD Anderson assumed a leadership role in translational and clinical cancer research, and was named the top cancer hospital in the United States in 8 of the past 10 years in U.S. News & World Report’s “America’s Best Hospitals” survey. Currently, Dr. Mendelsohn is the director of the Khalifa Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy at MD Anderson. Previously, he chaired the department of medi- cine at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. He began his career at University of California, San Diego, where he was founding director of its cancer center. Dr. Mendelsohn and his collaborators pioneered the concept of therapy targeting the products of genes that cause cancer. His team’s innovative research on inhibition of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase led to production and investigation of monoclonal antibody C225 (Erbitux), which is FDA-approved for colon cancer and head and neck cancer. He served as founding editor-in-chief of Clinical Cancer Research, published more than 250 articles and reviews, and received many prizes and awards. Dr. Mendelsohn is chair of the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum. He has directed postdoctoral programs that trained many dozens of medical oncologists and scientists. He is an active board member of several organi- zations, including Houston Grand Opera, the BioHouston and the Center for Houston’s Future. He earned his B.A. and M.A. in biochemical science and M.D. from Harvard University. Matthew L. Myers, J.D., is president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, a leader in the fight to reduce tobacco use and its devastating con- sequences in the United States and around the world. During the past 25 years, Mr. Myers participated in virtually every major U.S. tobacco-related

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APPENDIX B 107 legislative effort, worked on state tobacco prevention efforts, and worked in low- and middle-income countries around the world. Mr. Myers began his tobacco control work in 1980 at the Federal Trade Commission. From 1982 to 1996, Mr. Myers represented the Coalition on Smoking OR Health, an organization composed of the American Cancer Society, the American Lung Association, and the American Heart Association. Mr. Myers served as a close adviser to the state attorneys general in the 1990s when they sued the tobacco industry; participated in the 1996 negotiations that led to the first-ever settlement with a tobacco company, Liggett and Myers; participated in the negotiations that led to the unprec- edented agreement between the tobacco industry and the states in June 1997; and advised state attorneys general on issues related to the Master Settlement Agreement in 1998. Under Mr. Myers’ leadership the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids later led the effort that resulted in the FDA being given authority over tobacco products in 2009. In 1999 Mr. Myers was appointed to serve on the first tobacco advisory committee to the director general of the WHO and later participated in the negotiations that led to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. In 2000, Mr. Myers was named by President Clinton to co-chair a Presidential Commission to address the economic problems being expe- rienced by tobacco farmers and at the same time promote public health through a reduction in tobacco use. In 2011 Mr. Myers was selected to serve on the Civil Society Task Force to advise the president of the General Assembly of the United Nations (UN) in conjunction with the UN High Level Meeting on Non-Communicable Diseases In 1989, Mr. Myers received the Surgeon General’s Medallion from Dr. C. Everett Koop for contributions to the public health. In 2004, the Harvard School of Public Health bestowed its highest award, the Julius B. Richmond award, on Mr. Myers. In 2007, the American Cancer Society honored Mr. Myers with its highest award, the Medal of Honor. He holds a B.A. from Tufts University and a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School, where he was awarded the Order of the Coif and served on the staff of the Journal of Law Reform. Brenda Marion Nevidjon, R.N., M.S.N., FAAN, has had an extraordinary nursing career of leadership in service and education. It is distinguished by her being first, such as being the first nurse and first woman to be chief operating officer of Duke University Hospital or being in the inaugural class of the Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Executive Program. Through diverse

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108 REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY clinical and administrative experiences in Canada, Switzerland, and the United States, she has devoted her energy to bridging practice settings and academic environments to advance patient care, creating innovative work environments, promoting scholarship in practitioners, and developing lead- ers. She also has helped develop professional nursing organizations at the local, national, and international levels and has made lasting contributions to the Oncology Nursing Society. Ms. Nevidjon has contributed extensively to the nursing literature, and is regarded as a mentor for nurses to develop their power and voice through publication. Her contributions include two volumes of oncology nurses’ narratives, as well as books, articles, and chapters on oncology topics. She has published articles and book chapters on administrative topics, such as the role of advanced practice nurses and the nursing shortage. She has been interviewed by the media about nursing and the nursing shortage and was an invited speaker on National Public Radio’s Talk of the Nation: Science Friday. Ms. Nevidjon served as president of the Oncology Nursing Society from 2008 to 2010 and is professor and coordinator of the Health Care Systems Instructional Area in the MSN Program and lead faculty for nurs- ing and health care leadership in the master’s program at Duke University School of Nursing. She is a past president of the Oncology Nursing Society Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellows Alumni Association, and several local nursing and community organizations. Ms. Nevidjon is president-elect of the International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care, a Trustee of the Association of Community Cancer Centers, and a member of the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum. She is a member of several organizations, including the American Nurses Association, Sigma Theta Tau International, and the Council for Graduate Education for Administration in Nursing. She was a Fellow in the inaugural class of the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellows Program and completed the Johnson and Johnson/Wharton Fellows Program in Management for Nurse Executives. Ms. Nevidjon’s interests include leadership development with a focus on women in leadership, succession planning and development, and mentoring others to develop their writing abilities. Ms. Nevidjon was selected by the American Nurses Association (ANA) board of directors to receive the 2012 ANA Honorary Recognition Award for her distinguished service to the nursing profession. She earned her B.S.N. from Duke University and M.S.N. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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APPENDIX B 109 Jamie S. Ostroff, Ph.D., is an attending psychologist, member, and chief of the behavioral sciences service in the department of psychiatry & behavioral sciences at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Since 1999, she has served as founder and director of Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s Tobacco Cessation Program, a hospital-based program now serving more than 1,200 tobacco-dependent cancer patients, families, and staff annually. During the past 20 years, she has developed clinical and research expertise in treating tobacco dependence in varied health care settings, such as primary care, oncology care, dental care, and lung cancer screening sites. She leads a research team dedicated to developing and evaluating innovative, theory- driven interventions to enhance quitting motivation, and increasing use of evidence-based, cessation treatments, particularly in vulnerable popula- tions. She has published more than 95 peer-reviewed papers focusing on the behavioral and psychological aspects of cancer prevention and control, with specific expertise in tobacco cessation in health care settings and the psychological and behavioral issues associated with prevention, early detec- tion, and long-term follow-up care of patients with tobacco-related cancers. Her work has been well supported by the NCI, National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Lance Armstrong Foundation, and Legacy Founda- tion. Dr. Ostroff serves as co-leader for the New York state-supported Queens Quits! Tobacco Cessation Center, providing training and technical assistance to health care providers in Queens County, New York, in treat- ing tobacco dependence. She has also served on numerous tobacco control committees. Dr. Ostroff received her doctorate in clinical psychology from Vanderbilt University. She completed her clinical internship at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center and her postdoctoral fellowship in psych- oncology at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Terry F. Pechacek, Ph.D., is the associate director for science in the CDC OSH. He is responsible for monitoring all scientific work within the office, including the preparation of Surgeon General’s reports on the health consequences of tobacco use. OSH is the lead federal agency for compre- hensive tobacco prevention and control and is dedicated to reducing death and disease caused by tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke. Dr. Pechacek has served OSH as a visiting scientist and senior biomedical research scientist since 1995. In 1999, he was appointed the associate direc- tor for science. He is the senior author of the Best Practices for Comprehensive

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110 REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY Tobacco Control Programs (1999) and the 2007 update, and has also been involved in the preparation of Surgeon General’s reports on smoking and health since 1979. In 1986, Dr. Pechacek joined the NCI, leading the Com- munity Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation and the early development of the American Stop Smoking Intervention Trial. Dr. Pechacek has been involved in tobacco prevention and control research and public health activities since the 1970s. He is the author of more than 100 scientific publications and regularly provides expert testi- mony on the efficacy of public health strategies to prevent smoking- and tobacco-related diseases. In 2006, Dr. Pechacek was awarded the Surgeon General’s Medallion in recognition of his work to support the Office of the Surgeon General in communicating the risk of tobacco use. Dr. Pechacek received his Ph.D. in psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in preventive cardiology at the Uni- versity of Minnesota School of Public Health. After his fellowship, Dr. Pechacek remained at Minnesota as an associate professor and developed population-based interventions for the Minnesota Heart Health Program. Alexander V. Prokhorov, M.D., Ph.D., has spent most of his research career in Texas. He is currently a professor in the department of behavioral science at MD Anderson, director of the Tobacco Outreach Education Pro- gram, and codirector of the Duncan Family Institute eHealth Technology Program. During his tenure at MD Anderson, Dr. Prokhorov established a strong record of obtaining state and federally funded research grants and authored numerous peer-reviewed publications and book chapters. His work primarily focuses on creating and testing innovative tobacco preven- tion and cessation programs for high-risk teens and young adults. His interactive multimedia website, ASPIRE (A Smoking Prevention Interac- tive Experience), has reached thousands of young users in Texas, across the nation, and around the world. He also develops programs aimed at increas- ing awareness of the tobacco risks among the public and enhancing smoking cessation counseling skills among health care providers. He is a principal investigator for Enhancing Cancer Outreach for Low- Income Adults with Innovative Smoking Cessation, a study that uses an existing network of community sites to deliver smoking cessation treatment to a multiethnic population of uninsured and underinsured adults living in the Houston metropolitan area. Dr. Prokhorov is a sought-after speaker for conferences and seminars aimed at facilitating tobacco control and cancer prevention. He currently

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APPENDIX B 111 serves as a member of the Julius Richmond Center of Excellence, with the mission to protect children from exposure to secondhand smoke. His honors include the WHO Medal and Certificate, George and Barbara Bush Endowment for Innovative Cancer Research, MD Anderson Educator of the Month; an invitation to testify on smoking and adolescents before the President’s Cancer Panel; and the Robert M. Chamberlain Distinguished Mentor Award Nominee. Dr. Prokhorov was awarded the Joseph Cullen Award for Excellence in Tobacco Research from the ASPO. He was also a Julie and Ben Rodgers Award for Excellence in Cancer Prevention nominee. Dr. Prokhorov received his M.D. from the 1st Moscow Sechenov School and his Ph.D. from the USSR Cardiology Research Center. Linda Sarna, Ph.D., R.N., AOCN, FAAN, professor and Lulu Wolf Hassenplug Endowed Chair, School of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles, has published extensively in the nursing and interdisciplinary literature on nurses and tobacco control, and smoking patterns among health care professionals. She is a coeditor of the 2009 issue of Annual Review of Nursing Research: Advancing Nursing Science in Tobacco Control. She received the Distinguished Merit award from the International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care and a Distinguished Researcher award from the Oncology Nursing Society. Her current studies focus on nurses and tobacco control, and include projects in the United States, China, and the Czech Republic. She has collaborated with many nursing professional groups on tobacco control policies, including the ANA, American Academy of Nurs- ing, Oncology Nursing Society, and International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care. She received her B.S.N. and M.S.N. from the University of California, Los Angeles, and Ph.D. in oncology nursing from the University of California, San Francisco. Russell C. Sciandra, M.A., is the director of advocacy for the American Cancer Society (ACS) in New York State. He joined the ACS in 1996 to direct New York’s Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s SmokeLess States grant. In 1999, New York’s SmokeLess States coalition successfully advo- cated for a doubling of the state’s cigarette excise tax, using the revenue to fund a comprehensive tobacco control program and expand the New York Children’s Health Insurance Program. In 2000, the coalition played a key role in enacting the nation’s first law mandating fire-safe cigarettes. In 2001, New York banned self-service displays of tobacco products in retail stores, and in 2002, the coalition was heavily involved in the successful effort to

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112 REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY enact New York City’s Smokefree Air Act. In 2003, the coalition gained enactment of a statewide ban on smoking in all places of employment and public accommodation, including restaurants and bars. In 2008, state law banned smoking in college dormitories. Since 1999, New York has repeat- edly increased its cigarette tax, which at $4.35 is the highest in the nation. Mr. Sciandra worked at Roswell Park Cancer Institute from 1974 to 1991. From 1987 through 1991, he was project director of the Utica site in the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT) research project. Between 1992 and 1996, he was the manager of the Tobacco Control Program in the New York State Department of Health, and supervised the Department’s ASSIST program. Mr. Sciandra was hon- ored with the John Joseph Moakley Award for Leadership in Promoting Fire Safe Cigarettes by the Harvard School of Public Health in 2006, and in 2010 he received the National Staff Advocacy Leadership Award from the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network. He received his M.A. from City University of New York. Karla S. Sneegas, M.P.H., serves as branch chief for the program services branch of the CDC OSH. She oversees staff who are currently working with grantees to implement specific interventions related to the recently released Surgeon General’s Report Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults. Her staff also provide technical assistance to states, territories, tribes, and national networks to combat tobacco-related death and disease, including technical assistance for the CDC’s national media campaign, Tips from For- mer Smokers. Ms. Sneegas’s branch grants over $100 million annually. Pre- viously, Ms. Sneegas served as the assistant commissioner for the Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Commission at the Indiana State Department of Health. She planned and directed the implementation of the state’s tobacco control program, and provided leadership for the state and national tobacco control movement, serving as the chair of the executive committee of the National Tobacco Control Network. Ms. Sneegas served as the executive director for the Indian Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation Executive Board. She developed and managed budgets of $11 to $32 million annually, allocating funding according to the CDC’s Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs. With her oversight, staff provided grants management for more than 100 community, minority, and state grantees. Ms. Sneegas has provided con- sultation and training services in tobacco prevention and control policy, media advocacy, strategic planning, program management, community

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APPENDIX B 113 and leadership development, and coalition building and maintenance. She directed the Division of Tobacco Use Prevention in the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. She has published numerous articles, given many presentations, and received many awards and honors, including her selection as 1 of 100 Lifetime Alumni Honorees for the 100th Anniversary Celebration of the Family and Consumer Sci- ences Department, Western Kentucky University, and in receiving the Slade Memorial Advocacy Award from the American Public Health Association. Ms. Sneegas received her B.S., summa cum laude, from Western Kentucky University and her master of public health, health promotion and education from the University of South Carolina. Colleen Stevens, M.S.W., is the branch chief of the California Department of Public Health’s Tobacco Control Program. Ms. Stevens provides leader- ship and strategic direction to California’s internationally recognized and acclaimed program. Ms. Stevens also oversees the program’s statewide activi- ties, including capacity-building opportunities, an award-winning media campaign, and evaluation activities that ensure the effectiveness of efforts to denormalize tobacco use. She works with a multidisciplinary staff, many of whom are nationally and internationally recognized leaders in tobacco con- trol evaluation and program and media development and implementation. Previously, Ms. Stevens established and administered the program’s highly regarded, multiethnic tobacco control education media campaign since the program’s inception in 1989. She oversaw the development, production, and placement of media, as well as advertising and public relations activities. Her experience and technical advice is sought frequently by national and international tobacco prevention leaders and other public health pro- grams to help guide their own media campaigns. Ms. Stevens was a con- tributor to the CDC’s Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs in 1999 and 2007. Ms. Stevens holds a master’s degree in medical social work and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from California State University, Sacramento. Benjamin Toll, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine, a member of Yale Cancer Center, and the program director of the Smoking Cessation Service for Smilow Cancer Hos- pital at Yale-New Haven. He has received grants from the NIH, including the NCI and the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and he is the author of 40 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Toll’s research has focused on testing

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114 REDUCING TOBACCO-RELATED CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY novel smoking cessation treatments, and he has conducted five clinical trials in this regard. Many of his studies have investigated promotion of smoking cessation through novel telephone-based treatment modalities, including message framing and alcohol interventions. Dr. Toll has tested several pharmacological and counseling interventions, and he also has expertise in the measurement of tobacco use and tobacco-related syndromes (e.g., withdrawal, craving) and mediators and moderators of response to treat- ment. He received his B.A. from Cornell University and M.S. and Ph.D. from Nova Southeastern University. Kenneth E. Warner, Ph.D., M.Phil., has focused his research on economic and policy aspects of disease prevention and health promotion, with a special emphasis on tobacco and health. Dr. Warner served as the senior scientific editor of the 25th anniversary Surgeon General’s report on smok- ing and health, published in 1989. From 2000 to 2002 he served as the World Bank’s representative to negotiations on the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, WHO’s first global health treaty. He is on the editorial boards of three professional journals and chairs the board of the interna- tional journal Tobacco Control. During 2004–2005 he was president of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. He was a founding member of the board of directors of the American Legacy Foundation. He was also founding director of the University of Michigan Tobacco Research Network. Among Dr. Warner’s awards and honors are receipt of the Surgeon General’s Medallion; election to the IOM; being named to the first class of Fellows of the Association for Health Services Research (now AcademyHealth); receipt of the inaugural Outstanding Research Contribution award in the international Luther L. Terry Awards for Exemplary Leadership in Tobacco Control; and receipt of the Alton Ochsner Award Relating Smoking and Health in 2010. He is the Avedis Donabedian Distinguished University Professor of Public Health at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, where he has been on the faculty since 1972. He served as dean of the school from 2005 to 2010. An economist, Dr. Warner earned his A.B. from Dartmouth College and M.Phil. and Ph.D. from Yale University. Graham Warren, M.D., Ph.D., is a board-certified radiation oncologist and a scientist working to evaluate the effects of tobacco and tobacco products on cancer diagnosis, management, and treatment outcomes. He is the director of the Tobacco Assessment and Cessation Program at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI). His primary research focus is divided into

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APPENDIX B 115 three areas: (1) clinically efficient methods to accurately identify tobacco use in cancer patients with automated referrals to dedicated tobacco ces- sation resources; (2) evaluating the effects of tobacco and tobacco-related products on protein expression, tumor physiology, and therapeutic response in cancer cells; and (3) evaluating the effects of tobacco use and cessation on medical and economic outcomes in cancer patients. He has coordinated the development of a program for automated tobacco assessments with mandatory referrals to a dedicated cessation service delivered through the electronic medical record at RPCI. He is a member of the AACR Task Force on Tobacco and Cancer and is a member of the Prevention Committee for the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)/Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology Cooperative Group. In conjunction with AACR and CALGB/ Alliance, he is working closely with the ASCO, the International Associa- tion for the Study of Lung Cancer, and the NCI to increase awareness of the effects of tobacco in cancer patients; to develop effective evidence-based methods to identify patients at risk for continued tobacco use; and to pro- vide cessation support for patients who use tobacco. He is also working to identify critical mechanisms of tobacco-mediated changes in the therapeutic response to conventional cancer treatments. He received his B.S., Ph.D., and M.D. from the University of Kentucky.

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