Click for next page ( 136


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 135
Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff JOHN M. ABOWD (Chair) is Edmund Ezra Day professor of economics and professor of information science at Cornell University, research asso­ ciate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, research affiliate at the Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique (Paris, France), and research fellow at the Institute for Labor Economics (Bonn, Germany). He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association (2009) and of the Society of Labor Economists (2006). He was also the distinguished senior research fellow at the U.S. Census Bureau (1998–2009). He served as director of the Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research from 1999 to 2007. His current research focuses on the creation, dissemination, privacy protection, and use of linked, longitudinal data on employees and employers. In his work at the Census Bureau, he provided scientific leadership for the Longi- tudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Program, which produces research and public-use data integrating censuses, demographic surveys, economic surveys, and administrative data. His research on integrated labor market data is done in collaboration with the Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques, the French national statistical institute. He is cur- rently the principal investigator or co-principal investigator for multiyear grants and contracts from the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Census Bureau. He has published articles in the American Economic Re- view, Econometrica, the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of the American Statistical Association, and other major economics and statistics journals. Dr. Abowd served on the faculty at Princeton University, the University of Chicago, and the Mas- sachusetts Institute of Technology before coming to Cornell. His National 135

OCR for page 135
136 COLLECTING COMPENSATION DATA FROM EMPLOYERS Academies’ service includes membership on the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) Panel on Measuring Business Formation, Dynamics, and Performance and the Panel on Access to Research Data: Balancing Risks and Opportunities, and he is currently a member of CNSTAT. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. H. JUANITA (NITA) BEECHER is chair of the Employment Law & Liti- gation Group (ELLG), a network of senior corporate in-house labor and employment lawyers for Mercer LLC, and the compliance chair for the company’s U.S. diversity networks. She has more than 25 years experience in labor and employment law, particularly with class investigations by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). After serving as an in-house counsel in major corporations for more than 20 years, Ms. Beecher joined Mercer (then ORC) in 2000, and became the chair of the ELLG in 2003. In her role as compliance chair, she works with the OFCCP and the EEOC on matters of interest to Workforce Opportunity Network and ELLG members. Her corporate experience includes positions at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, the Consolidation Coal Company, Arch Mineral (now Arch Coal), and McDonnell Douglas/The Boeing Company. She is a graduate of the University of North Carolina School of Law. MARC BENDICK, JR., is an economist specializing in public and private initiatives to enhance mainstream economic opportunities for traditionally excluded individuals, families, businesses, and communities. He is the au- thor of more than 125 books, articles in refereed journals, and testimony before congressional committees. He has also served as an expert witness in more than 175 employment discrimination cases representing both plain- tiffs and defendants, including many of the nation’s largest class actions. He has been a consultant on discrimination and workforce diversity manage- ment to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, the U.S. Department of Justice, and some of the nation’s largest employers. Since 1984, he has been a prin- cipal in Bendick and Egan Economic Consultants, Inc. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin and a B.A. in economics and social psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. CHARLES C. BROWN is professor of economics and a research profes- sor at the Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research (ISR), University of Michigan. His past research has focused on topics such as compensating differentials, effects of minimum wage laws and of equal employment opportunity policies, the determinants of enlistment and re- enlistment in the military, and the relationship between employer size and

OCR for page 135
APPENDIX D 137 labor market outcomes. Current work focuses on measurement error in survey data, early-retirement windows, and consequences of the relatively equal opportunity in the military for children of black soldiers. He has been involved in the design and updating of the labor market status sections of the Heath and Retirement Study (HRS), and is currently analyzing data on early out windows offered to HRS respondents. Other current projects include an analysis of the relationship between age of firm and wages, and an exploratory study on children from military families. In addition to his research responsibilities for ISR’s Michigan Retirement Research Center, he is assisting the director in an advisory capacity. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. ELIZABETH HIRSH is assistant professor in the Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia. Her research interests include examining gender and race inequality, organizations, and the law. Much of her research in these areas focuses on employment discrimination and the consequences of legal prohibitions and organizational policies on labor market inequality. Current research includes a project examining the market, political, and organizational conditions under which employment discrimination lawsuits filed under U.S. equal employment opportunity laws bring about change in sex and race inequality in the workplace and a study of the impact of human resources practices on discrimination disputes. Other projects in- clude an analysis of how status characteristics, workplace conditions, and neighborhood contexts influence workers’ self reports of race discrimina- tion; an analysis of corporate adoption of gender identity and expression non-discrimination policies, and a study of the extent of occupational seg- regation by sex, race, ethnicity, and Hispanic origin in the U.S. labor force. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Washington. MARK R. KILLINGSWORTH is a professor of economics at Rutgers Uni- versity in New Brunswick, New Jersey. He was previously on the faculty of Barnard College and Fisk University. His research focuses on labor econom- ics. He is the author of Labor Supply and The Economics of Comparable Worth, and has written on comparable worth and pay equity issues. He has testified on immigration reform and comparable worth before com- mittees of the U.S. Congress, and has been a consultant to the Canadian Department of Justice, and the U.S. Departments of Justice and Labor. He was an undergraduate at the University of Michigan, and received M.Phil. and D.Phil. degrees from the University of Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. His recent work has been concerned with family members’ labor force participation decisions, labor market influences on fertility, and the effect of childhood religious instruction on adult earnings.

OCR for page 135
138 COLLECTING COMPENSATION DATA FROM EMPLOYERS JONATHAN S. LEONARD is George Quist chair in business ethics in the Economics Analysis and Policy Group at the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. He has served as a senior economist for the President’s Council of Economic Advisors and a fellow of the Na- tional Bureau of Economic Research. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. His research focuses on affirmative action, workplace regulation, job creation, and employee incentives. JANICE F. MADDEN is professor of regional science, sociology, and real estate at the University of Pennsylvania where she has been vice provost for graduate education. She is also a research associate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Population Studies Center and has previously served as di- rector of the Alice Paul Research Center and the Women’s Studies Program at the university. She has been a founder and has served on the board of directors of, and a consultant with, Econsult Corporation of Philadelphia. She has written on the economics of sex discrimination, changes in income and inequality within U.S. metropolitan areas, and wages and poverty. She has previously served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Vocational Education and Economic Development in Depressed Areas and chaired the Committee to Assess the Portfolio of the Division of Science Resources Studies of the National Science Foundation. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from Duke University and a B.A. in economics from the Uni- versity of Denver. THOMAS J. PLEWES (Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) and interim director of the Committee on Population. He was director for previous National Re- search Council studies on data collection sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education—a study of the estimation of English language learners—and ­ the U.S. Department of Agriculture—a review of the Agricultural Resource Management Survey. He has also directed several studies for CNSTAT sponsored by the National Science Foundation on topics such as research and development statistics and survey methodology. Previously, he was as- sociate commissioner for employment and unemployment statistics of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. He was a member of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology and is a fellow of the American Statistical Asso­ ciation. He has a B.A. in economics from Hope College and an M.A. in economics from the George Washington University. ALEKSANDRA (SESA) SLAVKOVIC is associate professor of statistics with appointments in the Department of Statistics and the Institute for CyberScience at the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and in

OCR for page 135
APPENDIX D 139 the Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey. She is currently serving as an associate editor of the Annals of Applied Statistics and Journal of Privacy and Confidentiality. Her primary research interest is in the area of data privacy and confidentiality. Other related past and current research interests include statistical analysis of usability evaluation methods and human performance in virtual environ- ments, statistical data mining, application of statistics to social sciences, algebraic statistics, and causal inference. She served as a consultant to the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Committee to Review the Scientific Evidence on the Polygraph in 2001 and part of 2002. She holds a Ph.D. in statistics from Carnegie Mellon University. FINIS R. WELCH is president of Welch Consulting. He testifies frequently on statistical and economic issues involving a variety of issues from allega- tions of employment discrimination to underwriting criteria for insurance companies. He is also distinguished professor emeritus of economics at Texas A&M University and professor emeritus of economics at the Uni- versity of California, Los Angeles. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago and taught microeconomic theory, econometrics, and labor eco- nomics to graduate students for 39 years. He has testified before Congress on various issues relating to public policy; his publications on the econom- ics of income, education, and employment have been frequently cited in the professional literature. He is an elected member of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science and a fellow of the Econometric Society. He is past vice president of the American Economic Association and past president and vice president of the Society of Labor Economists. VALERIE RAWLSTON WILSON is an economist and vice president of research at the National Urban League Policy Institute in Washington, DC, where she chairs the National Urban League’s Research Council and is responsible for planning and directing the Policy Institute’s Research Agenda. She is also a member of the National Urban League President’s Council of Economic Advisors, which assists the League in shaping national economic policy. Under her direction, the Policy Institute recently launched State of Urban Jobs, a component of Iamempowered.com, that features the Institute’s research and policy analysis and serves as a vehicle for com- municating the latest information related to African American and urban employment issues. Dr. Wilson has served as managing editor, associate editor, and contributing author for the National Urban League’s annual The State of Black America report and oversees production of the National Urban League’s annual Equality IndexTM. In 2001, a report she co-wrote with William E. Spriggs—formerly executive director of the National Urban

OCR for page 135
140 COLLECTING COMPENSATION DATA FROM EMPLOYERS League’s Institute for Opportunity and Equality (IOE)—earned the IOE the Winn Newman Award from the National Committee on Pay Equity. Dr. Wilson earned a Ph.D. from the Department of Economics at the Univer- sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her fields of specialization include labor economics, racial and economic inequality, and economics of higher education.