Appendix C

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

Alicia Carriquiry (Chair) is distinguished professor of liberal arts and sciences, professor of statistics, and director of graduate education at Iowa State University. Her research is in applications of statistics in human nutrition, bioinformatics, and traffic safety. She has published more than 70 peer-reviewed articles in areas of statistics, economics, nutrition, bioinformatics, mathematics, and animal genetics. She is associate editor of the Annals of Applied Statistics and Editor of StatProb, an electronic encyclopedia of statistics and probability. She is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, a fellow of both the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and a national associate of the National Research Council. She has served as vice president of the American Statistical Association, president of the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, member of the Executive Committee of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and member of the Board of Trustees of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. She received an M.Sc. in animal science from the University of Illinois and an M.Sc. in statistics and Ph.D. in statistics and animal genetics from Iowa State University.

David L. Banks is a professor of the practice of statistics at Duke University. Previously, he worked in three federal agencies: the National Institute of Science and Technology, the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. His research centers on applied Bayesian statistics, including network models, problems in transportation statistics, adversarial risk analysis, metabolomics, and agent-based models. He is a past editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association



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Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Panel Members Alicia Carriquiry (Chair) is distinguished professor of liberal arts and sci- ences, professor of statistics, and director of graduate education at Iowa State University. Her research is in applications of statistics in human nu- trition, bioinformatics, and traffic safety. She has published more than 70 peer-reviewed articles in areas of statistics, economics, nutrition, bioinfor- matics, mathematics, and animal genetics. She is associate editor of the An- nals of Applied Statistics and Editor of StatProb, an electronic encyclopedia of statistics and probability. She is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, a fellow of both the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and a national associate of the National Research Council. She has served as vice president of the American Statistical Association, president of the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, member of the Executive Committee of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and member of the Board of Trustees of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. She received an M.Sc. in animal science from the University of Illinois and an M.Sc. in statistics and Ph.D. in statistics and animal genetics from Iowa State University. David L. Banks is a professor of the practice of statistics at Duke Univer- sity. Previously, he worked in three federal agencies: the National Institute of Science and Technology, the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. His research centers on applied Bayesian statistics, including network models, problems in transportation statistics, adversarial risk analysis, metabolomics, and agent-based models. He is a past editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association 139

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140 ESTIMATING ILLEGAL ENTRIES AT THE U.S.–MEXICO BORDER and currently editor of Statistics, Politics and Policy. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Peter Brownell is an associate social scientist at RAND Corporation. Prior to joining RAND, he was a visiting research fellow at the Center for U.S.– Mexican Studies and a guest scholar at the Center for Comparative Immi- gration Studies, both at University of California, San Diego. His primary research interest has been on immigrants and immigration, with a particular focus on migration between Mexico and the United States. Past projects have addressed Mexican immigrants’ wages in the United States, the role of U.S. policy in structuring immigrants’ labor market outcomes and deci- sions regarding migration and settlement, the effects of the recent recession on return migration flows to Mexico, and other topics concerning Hispanic immigration to the United States. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. Stephen E. Fienberg is Maurice Falk university professor of statistics and social science in the Department of Statistics, the Machine Learning Depart- ment, and the Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University. His principal research interests lie in the development of statistical methodology, espe- cially for problems involving categorical variables. His recent research has focused on approaches appropriate for disclosure limitation in multidimen- sional tables and their relationship with bounds for table entries; estimat- ing the size of populations, especially in the context of census taking; and Bayesian approaches to the analysis of contingency tables. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Acad- emy of Sciences, and the Royal Society of Canada. He is a member of the Editorial Board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University. Mark S. Handcock is a professor of statistics at the University of Califor- nia, Los Angeles, where he is also an affiliate of the California Center for Population Research. He previously taught at the University of Washington, Pennsylvania State University, and New York University. His work focuses on the development of statistical models for the analysis of social network data, spatial processes, and longitudinal data arising in labor economics. His research involves methodological development motivated largely by questions from the social sciences and demography. Recent research has fo- cused on survey sampling techniques and missing data methods, especially for network data. He also works in the fields of distributional comparisons, environmental statistics, spatial statistics, and inference for stochastic pro- cesses. He served as associate editor of Annals of Applied Statistics, Journal of the American Statistical Association, and is a fellow of the American Sta-

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APPENDIX C 141 tistical Association. He holds a B.Sc. in mathematics from the University of Western Australia and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Chicago. Gordon Hanson is the Pacific Economic Cooperation chair in international economic relations at the University of California, San Diego, as well as director of the Center on Emerging and Pacific Economies. He holds fac- ulty positions in the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies and the Department of Economics. He previously was on the economics faculty at the University of Michigan (1998-2001) and the University of Texas (1992-1998). He specializes in the economics of international trade, international migration, and foreign direct investment. His current research examines the international migration of skilled labor, how border enforce- ment affects illegal immigration, the impact of imports from China on the U.S. labor market, and the global determinants of comparative advantage. He is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a co-editor of the Review of Economics and Statistics. He has an A.B. in economics from Occidental College and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Virginia Lesser is a professor and chair in the Department of Statistics and director of the Survey Research Center at Oregon State University. Her research interests are in sampling, survey methodology, environmental sta- tistics, and applied statistics. She has written on non-sampling error, the ef- fects of item and unit non-response on non-response error, and multi-mode surveys. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and member of the Techni- cal Advisory Committee for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. She has a Ph.D. in public health and biostatistics from the University of North Carolina. Pia Orrenius is assistant vice president and senior economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. As an officer in the regional group, she analyzes the regional economy, manages the Texas Business Outlook Surveys, and serves as editor of Southwest Economy, a publication of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. Her research focuses on the causes and consequences of Mexico–U.S. migration, unauthorized immigration, and U.S. immigration policy. She is a fellow of the Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University and a research fellow at the IZA Institute of Labor in Bonn, Germany. She is also an adjunct professor in the executive M.B.A. program at Baylor University (Dallas campus). During the 2004-2005 aca- demic year, she was a senior economist on the Council of Economic Advis- ers in the Executive Office of the President, where she advised the Bush administration on labor, health, and immigration issues. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles.

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142 ESTIMATING ILLEGAL ENTRIES AT THE U.S.–MEXICO BORDER Jeffrey S. Passel is a senior demographer at the Urban Institute. He previ- ously served as principal research associate at the Urban Institute’s Labor, Human Services, and Population Center. His expertise is immigration to the United States and the demography of racial and ethnic groups, and he has authored numerous studies on immigrant populations in America, undocumented immigration, the economic and fiscal impact of the foreign born, and the impact of welfare reform on immigrant populations. He holds a Ph.D. in social relations from Johns Hopkins University. Fernando Riosmena is an assistant professor in the Geography Depart- ment and the Population Program of the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His research investigates how demo- graphic processes are associated with the spatial and social mobility, well- being, and development in Latin American societies and with immigrant communities in the United States from those societies. His main research areas are immigrant health throughout different stages of the migration process and the role of U.S. immigration policy and social, economic, and environmental conditions in sending communities on the dynamics of mi- gration between Latin America and the United States. He holds a Ph.D. in demography from the University of Pennsylvania. Silvia Elena Giorguli Saucedo is director of the Center for Demographic, Urban, and Environmental Studies at El Colegio de Mexico. She has also taught at El Colegio de Mexico, the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and the Instituto Tecnologico Autonomo de Mexico. Her research focuses on adolescents and family structure, international migration, and the impact of population change in Mexico. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Brown University.