Appendix B

Biographical Information

ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON (panelist) is the director of the MIT Center for Digital Business at the MIT Sloan School of Management, a professor at the Sloan School, and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research examines the effects of information technologies on business strategy, productivity, and employment. His recent work studies data-driven decision making, the pricing implication of Internet commerce, and the role of intangible assets.

Brynjolfsson lectures worldwide on technology and strategy. Businessweek has profiled him as an “ebusiness visionary,” and he is a director or advisor for several technology-intensive firms. His recent books include Wired for Innovation: How IT Is Reshaping the Economy and Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution Is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy. His papers are available online (http://digital.mit.edu/erik ); he also blogs at www.economicsofinformation.com , and can be followed on Twitter (@erikbryn). He has bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Harvard and a Ph.D. from MIT.

LAWRENCE D. BURNS (planning committee member and speaker) is professor of engineering practice at the University of Michigan (U-M). In addition to his U-M role, he is director of the Roundtable on Sustainable Mobility with the Earth Institute at Columbia University. His focus at both institutions is energy policy and transportation. Prior to joining the U-M faculty, Larry completed a 40-year career with General Motors (GM) on October 1, 2009. He left GM as vice president of research and development and strategic planning, a role in which he oversaw GM’s advanced technology, innovation programs, and corporate strategy.



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Appendix B Biographical Information ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON (panelist) is the director of the MIT Center for Digital Business at the MIT Sloan School of Management, a professor at the Sloan School, and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research examines the effects of information technologies on business strategy, productivity, and employment. His recent work studies data-driven decision making, the pricing implication of Internet commerce, and the role of intangible assets. Brynjolfsson lectures worldwide on technology and strategy. Businessweek has profiled him as an “ebusiness visionary,” and he is a director or advisor for several technology-intensive firms. His recent books include Wired for Innovation: How IT Is Reshaping the Economy and Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution Is Accel- erating Innovation, Driving Productivity and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy. His papers are available online (http:// digital.mit.edu/erik); he also blogs at www.economicsofinformation.com, and can be followed on Twitter (@erikbryn). He has bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Harvard and a Ph.D. from MIT. LAWRENCE D. BURNS (planning committee member and speaker) is professor of engineering practice at the University of Michigan (U-M). In addition to his U-M role, he is director of the Roundtable on Sustain- able Mobility with the Earth Institute at Columbia University. His focus at both institutions is energy policy and transportation. Prior to joining the U-M faculty, Larry completed a 40-year career with General Motors (GM) on October 1, 2009. He left GM as vice president of research and development and strategic planning, a role in which he oversaw GM’s advanced technology, innovation programs, and corporate strategy. 39

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40 APPENDIX B Burns holds a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Cali- fornia at Berkeley, where he is a member of the Advisory Council for its Institute of Transportation Studies. He earned his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from General Motors Institute (now Kettering University) and his master’s degree in engineering/public policy from U‑M. He serves on the board of U‑M’s Automotive Research Center and the External Advisory Board for its Michigan Memorial Phoenix Energy Institute. In addition, he is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Midwest Research Institute and the Rochester Institute of Technology. Dr. Burns was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2011. He has also been honored with Kettering University’s Engineer- ing Alumni Achievement Award for his contributions to the engineering profession (2000), the National Campaign for Hearing Health Leader- ship Award from the Deafness Research Foundation (2002), the Alumni Merit Award from the University of Michigan Industrial and Operations Engineering Department (2005), the ASM International Medal for the Advancement of Research (2007), the Society of Plastics Engineers Global Engineering Leadership Award (2007), the Golden Gear Award from the Washington Automotive Press Association (2008), the Industry Pioneer Award from the Alternative Fuel Vehicle Institute (2008), and the Fuel Cell Seminar & Exposition Award for demonstrating significant leadership in promoting the overall advancement of fuel cell technology (2009). CURTIS R. CARLSON (planning committee member, keynote speaker, and group discussion leader), SRI president and CEO since 1998, is a world authority on creating value for customers through innovation. In 1973, he joined RCA Laboratories, which became part of SRI in 1987 as Sarnoff Corporation. There, Carlson started and helped lead develop- ment of HDTV technology that became the US standard. His book with William Wilmot, Innovation: The Five Disciplines for Creating What Customers Want, describes how SRI’s unique process for innovation can be applied to all types of government and commercial enterprises. He is a founding member of the Innovation Leadership Council for the World Economic Forum and was selected to serve on President Obama’s task force for research and development. Carlson received his B.S. in physics from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in atmospheric sciences from Rutgers University. His honors include a lifetime achievement award

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APPENDIX B 41 from Rutgers University’s School of Engineering and the Otto Schade Prize from the Society for Information Display. GARY L. COWGER (panelist) is chairman and CEO of GLC Ventures LLC, a management consultancy on business, manufacturing, and tech- nology strategy. He is also chairman of the board of trustees at Kettering University and serves on the board of directors of Delphi Corpora- tion. Cowger received his bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering at General Motors Institute (now Kettering University) in 1970; his master’s degree in management at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology in 1978; and he holds an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Lindenwood College (2002) and an honorary doctor of engineer- ing from Kettering University (2007). Mr. Cowger’s career at General Motors spanned 45 years. He served in various capacities at GM and, at his retirement, was group vice presi- dent of GM Global Manufacturing and Labor Relations. In this position he was responsible for directing all of GM’s manufacturing, manu-fac- turing engineering, and labor relations activities worldwide, and was a member of the Automotive Strategy Board and the Automotive Product Board. Cowger was instrumental in leading the development of several manufacturing technologies, including the use of math-based tools along with the adoption of synchronous and lean manufacturing at GM. Mr. Cowger was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for his contributions to the GM Global Manufacturing System, which dramatically improved flexibility, quality, and productivity in automotive manufacturing. He received the M. Eugene Merchant Manufacturing Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers in 2010. Dr. Cowger was named a fellow of Stanford University in 2006, only the fifth recipient of this honor in 20 years. He was selected Automotive Industries’ Executive of the Year (2004). He is the recipient of the Society of Automotive Engi- neers’ Manufacturing Leadership Award (2003) and the Shien-Ming Wu Foundation’s Wu Manufacturing Leadership Award (2001). JONATHAN S. DORDICK (panelist) is the Howard P. Isermann Pro- fessor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Rensselaer Polytech- nic Institute. Prof. Dordick received his B.A. degree in biochemistry and chemistry from Brandeis University and his Ph.D. in biochemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has held chemical engineering faculty appointments at the University of

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42 APPENDIX B Iowa (1987–1998), where he also served as the associate director of the Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1998–present) where he also holds joint appointments in the departments of Biomedical Engineering, Materials Science and Engi- neering, and Biology. Prof. Dordick’s research group includes chemi- cal engineers, bioengineers, materials scientists, biologists, chemists, and microbiologists all focused on gaining a quantitative understanding of biological principles and applying them to advance bioengineer- ing, nanobiotechnology, drug discovery, and biomanufacturing. Spe- cific areas of current research include enzyme structure and function at biological-material interfaces, high-throughput drug and functional materials discovery, and biologically inspired nanocomposites for 2D and 3D functional architectures. Prof. Dordick has received numerous awards, including the 2007 Marvin J. Johnson Award and the 2007 Elmer Gaden Award, both of the American Chemical Society, the 2003 International Enzyme Engineering Award, the 1998 Iowa Section Award of the American Chemical Society, and an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1989. He was elected a fellow of the American Chemical Society in 2010, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2004, and a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers in 1996. He serves on the scientific advisory boards for several biotech- nology companies and venture capital firms and has cofounded a num- ber of companies, including EnzyMed (now part of Albany Molecular Research, Inc.), Solidus Biosciences, and the Paper Battery Company. Dr. Dordick has published more than 300 papers and is an inventor/ co-inventor on nearly 40 patents and patent applications. KAIGHAM (KEN) J. GABRIEL (panelist) is acting director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). He was sworn in as the deputy director of DARPA in July of 2009. Founded in 1958 as a response to the Soviet Union’s launch of Sputnik, DARPA’s mis- sion is to prevent and create strategic surprise. Since its founding more than 50 years ago, this mission implies one imperative for the Agency: radical innovation for national security. Today, DARPA is the principal agency in the Department of Defense for research, development, and demonstration of high-risk, high-payoff projects for the current and future combat force. Dr. Gabriel previously served at DARPA between 1992 and 1997. In 1992, he was recruited to start the Agency’s Microelectromechanical

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APPENDIX B 43 Systems (MEMS) program and grew the effort to more than $80 mil- lion annually with more than 70 projects. He was promoted to direc- tor of the Electronics Technology Office (1996–1997), where he was responsible for nearly $450 million annually in electronics technol- ogy programs including advanced lithography, electronics packaging, MEMS, optoelectronics, millimeter and microwave integrated circuits, and high-definition displays. Prior to DARPA, Dr. Gabriel was the founder, chairman and chief technical officer of Akustica, a semiconduc- tor company commercializing MEMS sensors for consumer electronics products. Based in the United States with a global supply chain and cus- tomer base, Akustica pioneered the use of digital silicon microphones and shipped more than 5 million units to the PC/notebook industry before being acquired in 2009. Widely regarded as the architect of the MEMS industry, Dr. Gabriel was named a Technology Pioneer by the World Economic Forum at Davos in 2003, one of 40 selected worldwide. He is the co-founding executive director of the MEMS Industry Group, the principal trade organization representing the MEMS industry globally. An international lecturer on innovation and technology development, Dr. Gabriel holds an S.M. and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ANITA GOEL, MD, Ph.D., (planning committee member) is chairman and scientific director of NANOBIOSYM and chairman and CEO of NANOBIOSYM DIAGNOSTICS. She is a globally recognized leader in the emerging field of nanobiophysics—a new science at the conver- gence of physics, nanotechnology, and biomedicine. Nanobiophysics integrates these three fields to reveal new scientific solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges. Dr. Goel has given expert testimony before the US Senate Sub- committee on Science, Technology and Innovation, advised President Obama’s Strategy for American Innovation for the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), and helped build the roadmap for harnessing nanotechnology to stimulate the US economy. She has been a featured keynote speaker at many major international conferences, symposia, and university colloquia. Her pioneering contri- butions to nanotechnology and nanobiophysics have been recognized globally by prestigious honors and awards, including multiple awards from US government agencies. She received the Global Indus Technova- tor Award from MIT and was named one of the world’s “Top 35 Science

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44 APPENDIX B and Technology Innovators under the age of 35” by MIT Technology Review in 2005. Dr. Goel is a member of the Board of Overseers of the Boston Museum of Science, a charter member of TiE (The Indus Entrepre- neurs, a global organization of successful entrepreneurs engaged in the cycle of wealth creation and giving back to society), a fellow of the World Technology Network, a fellow-at-large of the Santa Fe Institute, an associate of the Harvard Physics Department, and an adjunct profes- sor of the BEYOND Institute for Fundamental Concepts in Science at Arizona State University. She also serves on the National Board of the Museum of Science and Industry, the International Advisory Board of the Victoria Institute of Science and Technology, the Nanotechnology Advisory Board of the Lockheed Martin Corporation, and is a founding member of the Global Council for the Center for Healthcare Innovation (CHI). Dr. Goel holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University, an M.D. from the Harvard-MIT Joint Division of Health Sciences & Technology (HST), and a B.S. in physics with honors and distinction from Stanford University. JAY GOLDEN (keynote speaker) is director of the Duke Center for Sustainability & Commerce, where he leads efforts to deliver impactful research and education programs on the important nexus of sustainabil- ity and manufacturing. He is also an associate professor of sustainable systems analysis in the Nicholas School of the Environment and the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University. He received his Ph.D. in engineering from the University of Cam- bridge and Master’s Degree in environmental engineering and sustain- able development from a joint program of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Cambridge. He also holds a Profes- sional Mastery of Project Management from Stanford University and has a bachelor’s degree in management. Dr. Golden co-founded and co-directed the Walmart-led Sustain- ability Consortium and founded the National Center of Excellence on SMART Innovations, which focused on engineering innovations for sustainable materials and renewable technologies. He was appointed to the UN Life Cycle Management Task Force and was named an AT&T Industrial Ecology Fellow. In 2009 he was awarded the Faculty Pioneer Award by the Aspen Institute for his leadership in the field of Sustain-

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APPENDIX B 45 ability Education and Research and was named by Ethisphere as one of the world’s most 100 influential people in business ethics. STEVEN MCKNIGHT (group discussion co-leader) is director of the Civil, Mechanical, and Manufacturing Innovation Division (CMMI) of the NSF Directorate for Engineering. Before that he was chief of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Materials Division, where he helped establish the Army’s nanotechnology research program and twice co- chaired the Army’s Nanotechnology Integrated Product Team. He also served as the Army’s primary representative on agency, interagency, and international materials research coordination and advisory groups. His personal research focuses on advanced polymer composite mate- rials and polymer adhesion science, including innovative composites manufacturing techniques using nontraditional consolidation and cur- ing methods for structural composite materials and composite material repair, tailored nanoscale engineering of composite fiber reinforcement for ballistic applications, and fundamental studies on the degradation mechanisms of multicomponent, high-performance military coating sys- tems. After receiving a B.S. in materials engineering from Virginia Tech, Dr. McKnight earned his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the University of Delaware. He has received two Army R&D Achievement Awards as well as the 1998 Paul A. Siple Memorial Award in recognition of outstanding research. He has published 33 journal articles and 19 government technical reports; he holds three patents, two patent applications, and two invention disclosures. MICHAEL F. MOLNAR (planning committee member and group discus- sion leader) is the first chief manufacturing officer for the Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In his position he is responsible for planning and coordinating the Insti- tute’s broad array of manufacturing research and services programs and for serving as NIST’s central point of contact with the White House and other agencies on policy issues and initiatives related to manufacturing. Mr. Molnar has extensive industrial experience and leadership roles including advanced manufacturing, metrology, manufacturing systems, quality, technology development, sustainability, and industrial energy efficiency. Before joining NIST, Mr. Molnar was director of environmental policy and sustainable development at the Columbus, Indiana, head- quarters of Cummins Inc., a $14 billion international company that

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46 APPENDIX B designs and manufactures commercial engines and power generation systems. Other credentials include his service as a federal fellow in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and election as fellow of both the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He is a licensed professional engi- neer, a certified manufacturing engineer. and a certified energy manager. He received an M.B.A. from the University of Notre Dame and both an M.S. in manufacturing systems engineering and a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin. He is an active member of professional societies, consortia, and volunteer organizations. PANOS Y. PAPALAMBROS (planning committee member and group discussion co-leader) is the Donald C. Graham Professor of Engineering and a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Michigan. He is also professor of architecture and of art and design. In addition, he is executive director of Michigan Interdisciplinary and Professional Engineering. Born in Patras, Greece, Dr. Papalambros attended the National Technical University of Athens (Ethnikon Metsovion Polytechnion) and earned a diploma in mechanical and electrical engineering in 1974. After moving to California, he attended Stanford University and earned his M.S. degree in mechanical engineering in 1976 and his Ph.D. degree (Design Division, Mechanical Engineering) in 1979. At Michigan he has served as a faculty member since 1979. His research interests include design science and optimization, with applications to product design and development, automotive systems, such as hybrid and electric vehicles, architectural design, and design of large complex engineered systems. With D.J. Wilde, he co-authored the textbook Principles of Optimal Design: Modeling and Computation (1988, 2000), and he has published more than 300 articles in journals, conference proceedings, and books. He is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), INFORMS, MPS, Society of Mechanical Engineers (SME), Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), International Society of Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization (ISSMO), American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), American Association of University Professors (AAUP), American Soci- ety for Engineering Education (ASEE), and the Design Society. He is also a fellow of ASME and SAE. Dr. Papalambros serves on the editorial boards of the journals Artificial Intelligence in Engineering Design and Manufacturing, Engineering Design, Engineering Optimiza-

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APPENDIX B 47 tion, Computer-Integrated Engineering, Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization, and the Journal of Engineering Simulation and he is chief editor of the ASME Journal of Mechanical Design. Dr. Papalambros is the recipient of the ASME Design Automation Award (1998), ASME Machine Design Award (1999), JSME Design and Systems Achievement Award (2004), and the ASME Joel and Ruth Spira Outstanding Design Educator Award (2007). In 2009 he received the Stephen S. Attwood Award, the highest honor of the College of Engi- neering at the University of Michigan. G.P. “BUD” PETERSON (panelist) is the 11th president of Georgia Tech. His research interests have focused on the fundamental aspects of phase change heat transfer, including heat transfer in reduced-gravity environments, boiling from enhanced surfaces, and some of the earliest work in the area of flow and phase change heat transfer in microchan- nels. Early investigations focused on applications involving the thermal control of manned and unmanned spacecraft and progressed through applications of phase change heat transfer, to the thermal control of electronic components and devices. More recently, investigations have included fundamental applications of phase change heat transfer to the field of biotechnology, including the in situ treatment of cancerous tissue using hypo- and hyperthermia to arrest epileptic seizures through the rapid cooling of localized brain tissue, which required highly efficient heat dissipation devices capable of dissipating thermal energy to sur- rounding tissue. Dr. Peterson has played an active role in helping to establish the national education and research agendas, serving on numerous industry, government, and academic task forces and committees. He has served on a number of congressional task forces, research councils, and advi- sory boards. In addition, he has served as a member of the board of directors and vice president for education for the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and co-chair of the Government Relations Committee of the Association of Public and Land-grant Uni- versities (APLU). He is a member of the National Science Board (NSB), the US Council on Competitiveness, the National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship (NACIE), and he was recently appointed by President Barack Obama as a member of the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (AMP) Steering Committee. Dr. Peterson is a fellow of both AIAA and the American Society of Mechanical Engi- neers. He is the author or coauthor of 14 books or book chapters, 195

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48 APPENDIX B refereed journal articles and more than 150 conference publications, and holds eight patents with three others pending. He is a member of several professional organizations and the recipient of numerous national and international honors and awards for both teaching and research. LOUIS W. RASSEY (panel moderator) is a principal in the Chicago Office of McKinsey & Company. Since joining in 2003, Rassey has been a leader in the firm’s Manufacturing, Operations and Private Equity Practices, with particular expertise in integrated operations improve- ment and operations strategy. In partnership with the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), he is coleading the firm’s effort to understand the “Future of Manufacturing” and its implications for how countries and companies compete. Rassey serves clients in the medical device, pharmaceutical, con- sumer products, automotive, and industrial sectors. His experiences include leading global efforts and performance transformations across operations disciplines—including innovation strategy, product design, manufacturing, supply chain, procurement, business development, and corporate strategy. Before joining McKinsey, Rassey worked for automotive and high- tech firms. He holds an M.B.A. and an M.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he was a Leaders for Manufacturing Fellow. He also holds an M.S. degree in engineering management from the University of Michigan-Dearborn, and a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Notre Dame. JONATHAN J. RUBINSTEIN (planning committee member and panel- ist) is former executive chairman and CEO, Palm Inc. Rubinstein has helped launch some of the most influential computing products of our time. He was Palm’s chairman and CEO before its acquisition by HP and was the driving force behind the company’s return to innovation with its award-winning webOS software and innovative smartphone devices. As head of the Palm global business unit, he was leading HP’s efforts in the mobility space, responsible for webOS software develop- ment and webOS-based hardware products. As a member of Apple’s senior executive staff, he was instrumental in conceiving the iPod and, as head of hardware engineering, led the rapid rollout of the iMac, a product that revitalized Apple and revolu- tionized personal computer design. Before joining Apple, he built his

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APPENDIX B 49 career at computer companies including Hewlett-Packard, Stardent, and NeXT, and founded his own company, Firepower Systems Inc. Rubinstein is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a senior member of the IEEE. He received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from Cornell University and a master’s degree in computer science from Colorado State University. MATT SAKEY (group discussion leader), an expert in cognitive develop- ment and interactivity, is a professional analyst and consultant for the $50 billion international video games industry. His work ranges from supporting game developers and publishers to designing game studies curricula at the university level. A featured monthly columnist for the International Game Developers Association (IGDA) and contributor to a series of university textbooks on game design and ludology, he owns the popular media criticism outlet www.tap-repeatedly.com and is a highly sought lecturer on interactive entertainment and training. In addition to his work in the games industry, Mr. Sakey develops training materials for corporate clients seeking to maximize knowledge transfer and retention through the use of interactive simulations and multimedia tools. WILLY SHIH (panel moderator) is a Professor of Management Prac- tice at the Harvard Business School. His interests are in national com- petitiveness and capability development by firms in emerging markets, global sequential production systems, and the management of science and technology intensive businesses. Before joining the Harvard Busi- ness School, he spent 18 years in the computer industry and 10 years in consumer electronics. Dr. Shih has two S.B. degrees from MIT and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. He is on the board of directors of Flextronics International, and he chairs the Technical Advisory Board for QD Vision, Inc., Watertown, Massachusetts. STEPHANIE SHIPP (group discussion leader) specializes in the assess- ment of science and technology projects, programs, and portfolios. Her work spans topics related to innovation and competitiveness with recent emphasis on advanced manufacturing, the role of federal laboratories, and funding of high-risk/high-reward research. Before joining the Sci- ence and Technology Policy Institute, she was the director of the Eco- nomic Assessment Office in the Advanced Technology Program at the

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50 APPENDIX B National Institute of Standards and Technology. Prior to that, she led economic and statistical programs at the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the Federal Reserve Board. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and has held several leadership posi- tions in the ASA. She was a member of the international advisory board for VINNOVA, Sweden’s innovation agency. Recently, she led an expert panel to evaluate the Swedish Research Council’s Linnaeus Grants. She holds a B.A. from Trinity College, Washington, DC, and a Ph.D. in economics from George Washington University. LAURA J. STEINBERG (panel moderator) is dean of Syracuse Uni- versity’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science and professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. She also holds an appointment as professor in the Department of Public Administration and International Affairs in Syracuse University’s Max- well School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Dean Steinberg earned a B.S. in civil and urban engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and master’s and doctoral degrees in environmental engineering from Duke University. Prior to joining aca- demia, Dean Steinberg worked for five years in the consulting engineer- ing field. Among Dr. Steinberg’s initiatives as dean are diversification of the faculty body, completion of a grass-roots strategic planning effort, incorporation of creative expression in the engineering curriculum, and significant growth in the college’s research and graduate programs in cybersecurity, energy engineering, and biomaterials. CHAD SYVERSON (planning committee member and group discussion leader) is a professor of economics in the Booth School at the University of Chicago. His research spans several topics, with a particular focus on the interactions of firm structure, market structure, and productivity. His work has been published in top journals and has earned several National Science Foundation Awards, Olin Foundation Grants, and a Brookings Dissertation Fellowship. Dr. Syverson is an associate editor of the Rand Journal of Econom- ics, an editorial board member of the B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research in its Productivity, Industrial Organization, Environmental and Energy Economics, and EFG Programs. He also serves on the board of the Chicago Census Research Data Center. Prior to these appointments, Dr. Syverson was a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Min-

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APPENDIX B 51 neapolis and a mechanical engineer co-op for Loral Defense Systems and Unisys Corporation. He earned two bachelor’s degrees in 1996 from the University of North Dakota, one in economics and one in mechanical engineering. He earned a master’s degree in 1998 and a Ph.D. in 2001, both in econom- ics from the University of Maryland. Dr. Syverson joined the Chicago Booth faculty in 2008. REBECCA R. TAYLOR (planning committee member) is senior vice president for the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), the largest not-for-profit research and development consortium in North America focused on manufacturing. NCMS consists of more than 300 member corporations working toward the goal of improving US manu- facturing competitiveness. Ms. Taylor is responsible for the opera- tion of the organization’s government efforts, liaison with members of Congress and the administration, oversight of NCMS government pro- grams, and overall management of the Washington, DC, and Bremerton, Washington, offices. Until August 1991, Ms. Taylor was as an international trade analyst for the US Department of Commerce. In this position she served as a principal in machine tool trade negotiations with the governments of Japan and Taiwan, representing the Bureau of Export Administration. She was also the Bureau’s representative to the interagency working group on the Intelligent Manufacturing Systems program for multi- lateral R&D cooperation. Prior to her tenure at the Department of Commerce, Ms. Taylor worked for the US Department of State in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research. Her portfolio included issues such as international border disputes, refugee and immigration issues, and international terrorism. In addition to her position at the NCMS, Ms. Taylor is the vice chair- man of the Board of Directors for the Robotics Technology Consortium and a board member of the Joint Defense Manufacturing Task Force of the National Coalition for Advanced Technologies. She is also on the Executive Committee of the National Defense Industrial Association’s Manufacturing Division and member of Women in Government Rela- tions and Women in Defense and the International Women’s Forum. Trained in Economics and Political Sciences, Ms. Taylor holds a bach- elor’s degree from the George Washington University and a master’s degree from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

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52 APPENDIX B CHARLES M. VEST (speaker) is president of the National Academy of Engineering. He served as MIT’s president from 1990 through 2004. He earned a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University in 1963 and received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 1964 and 1967, respectively, from the University of Michigan, where he later held the positions of dean of engineering, provost, and vice president for academic affairs. He is the recipient of 17 honorary doctoral degrees, the 2006 National Medal of Technology, and, in 2011, the Vannevar Bush Award from the National Science Board. Dr. Vest served on the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) during the Clinton and Bush administrations. Selected as a member of the bipartisan Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction, which completed its report in 2005, Dr. Vest brought a strong science and engineering back- ground to the analysis. He led a US Department of Energy task force on the future of science programs in 2002–2003 and chaired a presidential advisory committee on the redesign of the International Space Station in 1992–1994. Dr. Vest was vice chair of the Council on Competitive- ness for eight years, is a former chair of the Association of American Universities, and served on the US Secretary of Education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education and the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on Transformational Diplomacy. DAWN WHITE (panelist) has expertise in manufacturing R&D and technology company formation and financing, with extensive research experience in a range of materials processing fields, including welding and joining science, and rapid prototyping and tooling. She is founder and president/CTO of Accio Energy, and recently joined the Board of Directors of the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences. She has a B.S. and M.S. in metallurgical engineering and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois. She has published more than 30 technical papers and is a productive inventor, having been awarded 20 US patents with several additional patents pending. Previously Dr. White founded and was CEO of Ann Arbor–based Solidica Inc., based on the Ultrasonic Consolidation rapid prototyping process, which she invented and commercialized as the Formation™ rapid prototyping machine. Before starting Solidica, she worked in developing and deploying advanced manufacturing technology at Ford Motor Company, MTS Systems, and the US Army Construction Engi- neering Research Laboratory.