Appendix B

Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Water Resources Science, Engineering, and Planning

David A. Dzombak (NAE), Chair, is the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. University Professor of Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and faculty director of the Carnegie Mellon Steinbrenner Institute for Environmental Education and Research. He conducts research in water quality engineering and science, on topics pertaining to environmental restoration and the water-energy nexus. Dr. Dzombak is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a registered professional engineer in Pennsylvania, a diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, and a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He served as the chairman of the NRC Committee on the Mississippi River and the Clean Water Act. Dr. Dzombak holds a BA degree in mathematics from Saint Vincent College, BS and MS degrees in civil engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and a PhD degree in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Patrick A. Atkins is with Atkins 360, LLC, a Pittsburgh consulting firm that specializes in teaching and consulting on energy, lifecycle, and sustainability issues. Until his retirement in April 2007, Dr. Atkins was director of energy innovation at Alcoa, Inc., responsible for implementing solutions for waste heat recovery in refining, smelting, and casting, assessment of alternate (e.g., renewable) energy sources, and their applicability across Alcoa worldwide.



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Appendix B Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Water Resources Science, Engineering, and Planning David A. Dzombak (NAE), Chair, is the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. University Pro- fessor of Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and faculty director of the Carnegie Mellon Steinbrenner Institute for Environ- mental Education and Research. He conducts research in water quality en- gineering and science, on topics pertaining to environmental restoration and the water-energy nexus. Dr. Dzombak is a member of the National Acade- my of Engineering, a registered professional engineer in Pennsylvania, a diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, and a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He served as the chair- man of the NRC Committee on the Mississippi River and the Clean Water Act. Dr. Dzombak holds a BA degree in mathematics from Saint Vincent College, BS and MS degrees in civil engineering from Carnegie Mellon Uni- versity, and a PhD degree in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology. Patrick A. Atkins is with Atkins 360, LLC, a Pittsburgh consulting firm that specializes in teaching and consulting on energy, lifecycle, and sustainability issues. Until his retirement in April 2007, Dr. Atkins was director of energy innovation at Alcoa, Inc., responsible for implementing solutions for waste heat recovery in refining, smelting, and casting, assessment of alternate (e.g., renewable) energy sources, and their applicability across Alcoa worldwide. 105

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106 Corps of Engineers Water Resources Infrastructure Dr. Atkins is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Na- tional Society of Professional Engineers, and the Engineering Society of Western Pennsylvania. He is a past member of the Science Advisory Board for the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, and an operating advisor at Pegasus Capital Advisors, LLC, a New York-based private equity firm. Dr. Atkins is a registered professional engineer in Penn- sylvania and Texas. Dr. Atkins received a BS degree in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky and his MS and PhD degrees in environ- mental engineering from Stanford University. Gregory. B. Baecher (NAE) is the G.L. Martin Institute Professor of Engi- neering at the University of Maryland in College Park. Dr. Baecher’s princi- pal area of work addresses the reliability of civil infrastructure and project risk management, especially in geotechnical and water resources engineer- ing. From 1998 to 2005 he served as a member of the NRC Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. Baecher is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on several NRC committees. He chaired the NRC Committee on Risk-Based Analyses for Flood Damage Reduction and the Panel on (Corps of Engineers) Methods and Techniques of Project Anal- ysis. He holds a BS degree in civil engineering from the University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley, and ScM and PhD degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Linda K. Blum is a research associate professor in the Department of Envi- ronmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. Her current research pro- jects include study of how living organisms modify the geomorphology of salt marshes in response to external drivers such as sea-level, precipitation, tides, and/or anthropogenic nitrogen loading; mechanisms controlling bac- terial community abundance, productivity, and structure in tidal marsh creeks and soils; and rhizosphere effects on organic matter decay in anaero- bic sediments. Dr. Blum served as chair of the NRC Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Initiative and was a member of the NRC Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, the Committee on Inde- pendent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress, and the Committee on Challenges and Opportunities in Earth Surface Processes. She earned her BS and MS degrees in forestry from Michigan Technological

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Appendix B 107 University and her PhD degree in soil science and microbial ecology from Cornell University. Robert A. Dalrymple (NAE) is the Willard and Lillian Hackerman Professor of Civil Engineering at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. His major research interests and projects are in the areas of coastal engineer- ing, wave mechanics, fluid mechanics, littoral processes, and tidal inlets. His current interests are water wave modeling, tsunamis and their impacts on shorelines, and the interaction of water waves with the sea bed, specifically mud bottoms. He chaired the NRC Committee on the Review of the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration (LACPR) Program and currently is chairing the NRC Committee on Sea Level Rise in California, Oregon, and Washington. Dr. Dalrymple received his AB degree in engineering sciences from Dartmouth University, his MS degree in ocean engineering from the University of Ha- waii, and his PhD degree in civil and coastal engineering from the Universi- ty of Florida. Misganaw Demissie is director of the Illinois State Water Survey at the Uni- versity of Illinois. His research at the Water Survey has focused on water- shed science with emphasis on erosion and sedimentation and watershed hydrology. He has published more than one hundred journal articles, re- ports, and conference proceedings. Dr. Demissie is recipient of several awards, including The Frank Bellrose Illinois River Conservation Award from the Nature Conservancy for outstanding service and contribution to- ward the restoration of the Illinois River. Dr. Demissie is a registered profes- sional engineer in Illinois. He is a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, a diplomate of the American Academy of Water Resources Engi- neers, and a member of the International Water Resources Association and the International Association of Hydrological Sciences. Dr. Demissie re- ceived his BS degree in civil engineering from the University of Iowa and his MS and PhD degrees in civil engineering from the University of Illinois. Terrance J. (Terry) Fulp is the Regional Director for the U.S. Bureau of Rec- lamation’s Lower Colorado River region, headquartered in Boulder City, Nevada. Dr. Fulp is involved in numerous Colorado River issues, working with federal and state agencies and other stakeholder groups on system op-

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108 Corps of Engineers Water Resources Infrastructure erations decisions. Prior to his appointment as deputy regional director, he served as area manager of the Boulder Canyon Operations Office, where he managed a basin-wide effort to develop additional operational guidelines for Lake Powell and Lake Mead to minimize the effects of long-term drought. He was the principal investigator for the Department of the Interi- or’s Watershed and River Systems Management Program. The program developed decision support tools for watershed management and resulted in development of RiverWareTM, a river operations modeling framework now used by several water management agencies—including Reclamation and the Corps of Engineers. Dr. Fulp received his BS degree in earth scienc- es from the University of Tulsa, his MS degree in geophysics from Stanford University, and his PhD in mathematical and computer sciences from the Colorado School of Mines. Larry Larson is the executive director of the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM), headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin. A founding member of ASFPM in the 1970s, Larson oversees the Association’s activities and communications and coordinates national flood and water resources policy development and advancement with state, local, and federal agencies; the Administration and Congress; and other policy groups and organiza- tions. He also spent 30 years with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources managing flood loss reduction, dam safety, and wetlands pro- grams, and five years with the California Department of Water Resources on design and construction of large dams, aqueducts, and water projects. An expert in developing the nation’s policy on wise and sustainable use of floodplains, Larry has authored numerous position papers and articles, pro- vides expert testimony to Congress, and frequently speaks to policy makers and flood hazard managers nationally and abroad. He is a Certified Flood- plain Manager and a registered professional engineer in California and Wis- consin. Larry holds a BS degree in civil engineering from the University of Wisconsin. Diane M. McKnight is a professor in the Department of Civil, Environmen- tal, and Architectural Engineering, and a fellow of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, at the University of Colorado. Prior to her current post she was a research scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources

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Appendix B 109 Division. Her areas of research are biogeochemical processes, aquatic ecolo- gy, and reactive solute transport in streams and lakes in the Rocky Moun- tains and in polar desert areas of Antarctica. She has published numerous journal articles and book chapters and edited several books. In 1995, along with three other limnologists, she coauthored The Freshwater Imperative: A Research Agenda. Dr. McKnight is past president of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography and of the biogeosciences section of the American Geophysical Union, and she was the first editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. Since serving on the NRC Committee on Climate Change and Water Resources Management in 1990-1992, she has served on several other NRC committees, as well as the Polar Research Board and the Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. McKnight received her BS degree in mechanical engineering, MS degree in civil engineering, and PhD degree in environmental engineering from the Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology. J. Walter Milon is the chair and Provost’s Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Economics, College of Business Administration, at the University of Central Florida. His major research interests are water re- source economics, ecosystem valuation, and environmental policy. In addi- tion to his academic research and publications, Dr. Milon has conducted research and consulting for a number of federal agencies, including the En- vironmental Protection Agency, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Dr. Milon received his BS degree in finance and his MS and PhD degrees in economics from Florida State University. A. Dan Tarlock is a professor at the Chicago-Kent College of Law, where he teaches courses in land use, property, energy and natural resource law, envi- ronmental policy, and international environmental law. He is an interna- tionally recognized expert in environmental law and the law of land and water use. He has published a treatise, Law of Water Rights and Resources, and is a coauthor of four casebooks. Professor Tarlock is a frequent consult- ant to local, state, federal, and international agencies, private groups and law firms and is an elected member of the American Law Institute. From 1989 to1992, he served as chairman of the NRC Committee on Western Water

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110 Corps of Engineers Water Resources Infrastructure Management. In 1996-97 he was the principal report writer for the Western Water Policy Review Advisory Committee. He is a member of the California State Bar. Professor Tarlock is currently one of three U.S. special legal advis- ers to the NAFTA Commission on Environmental Cooperation. He also is a national associate of The National Academies. Professor Tarlock received his BA and JD degrees from Stanford University. Peter R. Wilcock is a professor of geography and environmental engineer- ing at the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. His areas of research focus on river sedimentation processes and their role in stream restoration and river management. His research includes both laboratory and field experiments in sediment transport, open-channel flow, and fluvial and hillslope geomorphology. Dr. Wilcock served as chair of the NRC Panel on River Basin Systems and Coastal Planning and was a member of the NRC Committee on Grand Can- yon Monitoring and Research. He received his BS degree in physical geog- raphy from the University of Illinois, his MS degree in geomorphology from McGill University, and his ScD degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.