D
Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches

COMMITTEE

Jacqueline Richter-Menge (Cochair) is a research civil engineer at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL). Ms. Richter-Menge has focused her research activities on developing a more comprehensive and quantitative understanding of the Arctic sea ice cover, addressing both dynamic and thermodynamic processes. She is a lead investigator in the National Science Foundation Arctic Observing Network program and, with additional support from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Program Office, directs the activities of a multiagency team establishing a network of autonomous in situ sea ice mass balance observatories. She is a coordinating editor for the Web-based Arctic Report Card for the NOAA Climate Program Office, chairs the U.S. Submarine Arctic Science Program (SCICEX) Science Advisory Committee, and is the sea ice science team lead for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Operation Ice Bridge Project. In association with her research, Ms. Richter-Menge has gained significant first-hand Arctic experience leading or participating in more than 15 field programs. She actively participates in a wide range of outreach activities, including the coordination of the Adopt-A-Buoy project aimed at middle school science students. Ms. Richter-Menge graduated with a Master of Civil Engineering from the University of Delaware and has been with CRREL since 1981.

John Walsh (Cochair) is a President’s Professor of Global Climate Change at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF). He is also the director of the NOAA/UAF Cooperative Institute for Alaska Research and of the Center for Global Change. His primary research interests are Arctic climate change over the decade-to-century timescale; predictability of climate change in high latitudes, sea ice variations; and extreme weather events in the context of climate change. He was the lead author for the cryosphere chapter of the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (2005) and a lead author for the Polar Regions chapter of the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report (2007). He is a coordinating lead author for the 2013 National Assessment Report being produced by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Prior to his position at the University of Alaska, Walsh spent 30 years on the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana. He is the coauthor of an undergraduate textbook on severe and hazardous weather. He earned his Ph.D. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1974 and his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1970.

Lawson Brigham is Distinguished Professor of Geography & Arctic Policy at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and a senior fellow at the Institute of the North in Anchorage. During 2005-2009 he was chair of the Arctic Council’s Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment and vice chair of the council’s working group on Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment. Dr. Brigham was a career U.S. Coast Guard officer, serving from 1970 to 1995 and retiring



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D Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches COMMITTEE John Walsh (Cochair) is a President's Professor of Global Climate Change at the University of Jacqueline Richter-Menge (Cochair) is a Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF). He is also the director research civil engineer at the Cold Regions of the NOAA/UAF Cooperative Institute for Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL). Alaska Research and of the Center for Global Ms. Richter-Menge has focused her research Change. His primary research interests are activities on developing a more comprehensive Arctic climate change over the decade-to- and quantitative understanding of the Arctic sea century timescale; predictability of climate ice cover, addressing both dynamic and change in high latitudes, sea ice variations; and thermodynamic processes. She is a lead extreme weather events in the context of climate investigator in the National Science Foundation change. He was the lead author for the Arctic Observing Network program and, with cryosphere chapter of the Arctic Climate Impact additional support from the National Oceanic Assessment (2005) and a lead author for the and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Polar Regions chapter of the IPCC's Fourth Climate Program Office, directs the activities of Assessment Report (2007). He is a coordinating a multiagency team establishing a network of lead author for the 2013 National Assessment autonomous in situ sea ice mass balance Report being produced by the U.S. Global observatories. She is a coordinating editor for Change Research Program. Prior to his position the Web-based Arctic Report Card for the at the University of Alaska, Walsh spent 30 years NOAA Climate Program Office, chairs the U.S. on the faculty of the University of Illinois at Submarine Arctic Science Program (SCICEX) Urbana. He is the coauthor of an undergraduate Science Advisory Committee, and is the sea ice textbook on severe and hazardous weather. He science team lead for the National Aeronautics earned his Ph.D. in meteorology from the and Space Administration Operation Ice Bridge Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1974 Project. In association with her research, Ms. and his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1970. Richter-Menge has gained significant first-hand Arctic experience leading or participating in Lawson Brigham is Distinguished Professor of more than 15 field programs. She actively Geography & Arctic Policy at the University of participates in a wide range of outreach Alaska Fairbanks, and a senior fellow at the activities, including the coordination of the Institute of the North in Anchorage. During Adopt-A-Buoy project aimed at middle school 2005-2009 he was chair of the Arctic Council's science students. Ms. Richter-Menge graduated Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment and vice with a Master of Civil Engineering from the chair of the council's working group on University of Delaware and has been with Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment. CRREL since 1981. Dr. Brigham was a career U.S. Coast Guard officer, serving from 1970 to 1995 and retiring 77

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78 Appendix D with the rank of Captain. He served at sea in Atmospheric Research (NCAR). She received command of four Coast Guard cutters including her Ph.D. in 1997 from the Program in a patrol boat, Great Lakes icebreaker, offshore Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences at the law enforcement cutter, and the polar icebreaker University of Colorado in the area of sea ice Polar Sea sailing in Alaskan, Arctic, and modeling for climate applications. Her training Antarctic waters; he also served as chief of continued with a postdoctoral fellowship at the strategic planning in Washington, D.C. Dr. University of Victoria in British Columbia, Brigham has been a research fellow at Woods studying the influence of sea ice variability and Hole Oceanographic Institution, a faculty change on the global ocean circulation and member of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and climate. In 1999, Dr. Holland moved to NCAR the Naval Postgraduate School, and deputy in Boulder, Colorado, as a postdoctoral fellow director of the U.S. Arctic Research and joined the scientific staff in 2000. Her Commission. He is a graduate of the U.S. Coast research interests include polar climate Guard Academy (B.S.), a distinguished graduate variability and future change, including the role of the U.S. Naval War College, and holds of ice-ocean-atmosphere interactions and graduate degrees from Rensselaer Polytechnic feedbacks. She has extensive experience using Institute (M.S.) and the University of Cambridge coupled climate models to study these issues and (M.Phil. and Ph.D.). His research interests has been active in the development of improved include Arctic marine transportation, remote sea ice models for climate simulations. She is sensing of sea ice, Arctic climate change, and currently serving as chief scientist for the polar marine policy. Community Earth System Modeling Project. Jennifer A. Francis is a research professor at the Son V. Nghiem is the Science Applications Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences and the Development lead of the Radar Science and Graduate Program in Atmospheric Sciences at Engineering Section, and the Hydrology Rutgers University. She studies the Arctic Discipline program manager of the Hydrology climate system, causes for rapid change, and Office in the Earth Science and Technology linkages between the Arctic and the global Directorate at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of climate system. Her work is funded primarily by the California Institute of Technology. His the National Science Foundation. She has served research encompasses active and passive remote on several national committees in the National sensing, advanced satellite radars and Science Foundation, the American radiometers, electromagnetic scattering and Meteorological Society, and the science steering emission, and earth sciences and applications. committee for the Study of Arctic He has published 70 peer-reviewed articles and Environmental Change (SEARCH). Dr. Francis over 230 conference articles. He received the received her Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from 1999 Lew Allen Award for Excellence in the University of Washington in 1994. Dr. recognition of his pioneering research in the Francis is currently a member of the Polar areas of polarimetric scatterometry for earth Research Board. science remote sensing and contributions to future advanced satellite instrument concepts; Marika Holland is a an ice specialist in the the 2006 NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal Oceanography section of the Climate and Global for developing scientific applications of Dynamics division at the National Center for scatterometry in land, ice, and snow processes;

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Appendix D 79 the 2008 NASA Exceptional Scientific products and has applied these concepts in Shell Achievement Medal for his contributions to internal data management and dissemination understanding the melt state of Greenland and systems. Mr. Raye is Shell's subject matter expert Antarctica ice sheets, its significance in earth for oceanographic surveys and is skilled in science missions, and its implications in climate environmental instrumentation, data analyses, change; and the 2010 NASA Exceptional and data management. Mr. Raye holds a Master Technology Achievement Medal for his of Science degree in ocean engineering from contributions in developing a new technology Florida Atlantic University. using NASA satellite scatterometer data to measure high-resolution global wind for Rebecca Woodgate 1 is a principal offshore wind energy development. His research oceanographer and associate professor at the results were reported worldwide by major news Applied Physics Laboratory and the School of networks and many radio stations. Dr. Nghiem Oceanography at the University of Washington. received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts She is a physical oceanographer, specializing in Institute of Technology in 1991. polar research, with special focus on the circulation of the Arctic Ocean, interactions Robert Raye is the Ice and Metocean Project between sea ice and the ocean, and the role of lead for Shell Projects and Technology in the the polar oceans in climate. Her research U.S. Arctic. In this role, Mr. Raye is responsible concentrates on the collection and analysis of in for providing support to field activities and situ oceanographic data. She has worked for design engineering to ensure safe and efficient many years in the deployment and recovery of operations. He has a key role in delivery of moored oceanographic instrumentation in ice- Shell's Arctic physical science program, which covered waters, and the analysis of both mooring includes collection of field measurements, and hydrographic data. She is involved in characterization and research studies, and undergraduate teaching and graduate education. collaborative programs with industry partners, She has worked on British, German, Norwegian, academia, and governmental agencies. Mr. Raye and American research vessels and led has established a field observation program in expeditions to the Bering Strait and the Arctic Alaska that includes a network of instrumented Ocean. Her first degree is in physics from the buoys, coastal meteorological stations, and University of Cambridge and her Ph.D. vessel-based observers that report near-real-time (University of Oxford) is in data assimilation in data used to validate models and forecasts. ocean models. Her postdoctoral work was done Recently, he has been instrumental in at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany. Dr. developing collaborative agreements with Woodgate's research goal is to understand the NOAA offices to share data and resources, with physical processes in both Arctic and Antarctic the goal of improving overall weather and ice regions, and to use her background to bridge the forecasting in Alaska and improving hurricane gap between theory, modeling, and real intensity forecasting in the Gulf of Mexico. He observations of the oceans. serves on the Data Management and Communications Committee in the Gulf Coast Ocean Observing System, where he supports initiatives promoting data interoperability, metadata standards, and Web services for data 1 Member through June 2012

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80 Appendix D NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL STAFF Choices, Frontiers in Understanding Climate Change and Polar Ecosystems, and Future Ms. Katie Thomas is an associate program Science Opportunities in Antarctica and the officer for the Board on Atmospheric Sciences Southern Ocean. Amanda received her and Climate (BASC). She received her B.S. from bachelor's degree in physics and mathematics the University of Michigan in 2004 and her M.S. from American University in 2008. She is also in environmental science and policy from Johns currently pursuing a master's in mathematics Hopkins University in 2009. Since joining the from American University, anticipated in 2013. National Research Council in 2006, she has worked on studies related to urban meteorology, Dr. Alexandra Jahn is a project scientist at the climate modeling, weather radar, and advancing National Center for Atmospheric Research climate science. (NCAR). Her research interests are in Arctic sea ice and freshwater dynamics, climate modeling, Ms. Lauren Brown is a research associate with ocean tracers, and paleoclimate. Alexandra the Polar Research Board and the Board on received her Ph.D. in atmospheric and oceanic Atmospheric Sciences and Climate at the sciences from McGill University in 2010, for her National Academies, where she has been research on Arctic Ocean freshwater dynamics. involved in a number of National Research After a 2-year postdoctoral appointment in the Council studies such as America's Climate Advanced Study Program at NCAR, Alexandra Choices, Lessons and Legacies of International was a Christine Mirzayan Science Policy Fellow Polar Year 2007-2008, and Future Science with the National Research Council's Polar Opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Research Board in early 2012, before returning Ocean. She holds an M.S. in marine studies with to NCAR for her current appointment. a focus on physical ocean science and engineering and a B.A. in physics and astronomy Ms. Elizabeth Finkelman is a senior program from the University of Delaware. She is assistant for the Board on Atmospheric Sciences especially interested in high-latitude and Climate (BASC). She received her Bachelor environmental policy issues and the role of polar of Arts and Science degree from McGill regions in global climate change. University in 2010, concentrating in molecular biology and political science. Since joining the Ms. Amanda Purcell is a research associate with National Research Council in March 2011, she the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate has participated in board-related projects and (BASC). She began working with BASC as a studies concerning climate change, urban program assistant in 2008 and has since worked meteorology, climate modeling, and urban on various projects including America's Climate forestry.