B
Workshop Agenda and Participants

AGENDA

September 8, 2011
8:45 a.m. Welcome Gerald R. North, Texas A&M University
Session 1
9:00 Overview and Advances in Radiometry for Solar Observations
Greg Kopp, University of Colorado, Boulder
10:00 Assessing Solar and Solar-Terrestrial Influences as a Component of Earth’s Climate Change Picture
Daniel N. Baker, University of Colorado, Boulder
11:00 Heliospheric Phenomena Responsible for Cosmic Ray Modulation at the Earth
Joe Giacalone, University of Arizona
11:45 Behavior of Quiet Sun Contributions to Solar Irradiance
Peter Foukal, Heliophysics, Inc. (by WebEx), Session Chair
12:30 p.m. Lunch
1:15 The Record of Solar Forcing in Cosmogenic Isotope Data
Raimund Muscheler, Lund University, Sweden
Session 2
2:00 Issues in Climate Science Underlying Sun/Climate Research
Isaac M. Held, NOAA GFDL, Session Chair
3:00 Indirect Climate Effects of the Sun Through Modulation of the Mean Circulation Structure
Caspar Ammann, National Center for Atmospheric Research


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 34
B Workshop Agenda and Participants AGENDA September 8, 2011 8:45 a.m. Welcome Gerald R. North, Texas A&M University Session 1 9:00 Overview and Advances in Radiometry for Solar Observations Greg Kopp, University of Colorado, Boulder 10:00 Assessing Solar and Solar-Terrestrial Influences as a Component of Earth’s Climate Change Picture Daniel N. Baker, University of Colorado, Boulder 11:00 Heliospheric Phenomena Responsible for Cosmic Ray Modulation at the Earth Joe Giacalone, University of Arizona 11:45 Behavior of Quiet Sun Contributions to Solar Irradiance Peter Foukal, Heliophysics, Inc. (by WebEx), Session Chair 12:30 p.m. Lunch 1:15 The Record of Solar Forcing in Cosmogenic Isotope Data Raimund Muscheler, Lund University, Sweden Session 2 2:00 Issues in Climate Science Underlying Sun/Climate Research Isaac M. Held, NOAA GFDL, Session Chair 3:00 Indirect Climate Effects of the Sun Through Modulation of the Mean Circulation Structure Caspar Ammann, National Center for Atmospheric Research 34

OCR for page 34
4:00 Climate Response to the Solar Cycle as Observed in the Stratosphere Lon Hood, University of Arizona 4:45 Direct Solar Forcing of the Lower Atmosphere and Ocean Gerald A. Meehl, National Center for Atmospheric Research 5:30 Adjourn for the day September 9, 2011 Session 3 9:00 a.m. Detection of the Solar Signal in Climate from Paleorecords Raymond S. Bradley, University of Massachusetts 9:45 Detecting the Solar Cycle Via Temperature Proxies Back to the Maunder Minimum Gerald North, Texas A&M University 10:45 Climate Response at Earth’s Surface to Cyclic and Secular Solar Forcing Ka-Kit Tung, University of Washington, Session Chair 11:40 Solar Effects Transmitted by Stratosphere-Troposphere Coupling Joanna D. Haigh, Imperial College, London 12:25 p.m. Lunch Session 4 1:30 The Impact of Energetic Particle Precipitation on the Atmosphere Charles Jackman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2:15 Cosmic Rays and Cloud Nucleation Jeffrey Pierce, Dalhousie University 3:00 Solar Grand Minima Inferred from Observations of Sun-like Stars Dan Lubin, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego Panel Discussion 3:45 Panel Discussion led by Joanna Haigh and Daniel Baker 35

OCR for page 34
1. What is the most recent and/or most compelling evidence of the impact of solar variability on climate, particularly in the lower atmosphere, over decadal timescales? 2. What can we learn of the variability of solar irradiance using paleoclimate records? 3. What can we learn of climate responses to solar variability using paleoclimate records? 4. Are there any significant climate impacts of solar variability on regional scales? 5. What are the research directions, additional observations, and/or model improvements necessary to improve understanding and forecast ability regarding solar variability and climate, particularly over the solar cycle timescale? 5:00 Closing Remarks Gerald North, Texas A&M University 5:30 Workshop adjourns PARTICIPANTS Caspar Ammann, National Center for Atmospheric Research Susanne Benze, University of Colorado, Boulder Blair Bowers, Caset Associates, Ltd. Matthias Brakesusch, University of Colorado, Boulder Gabriel Chiodo, Universidad Complutense de Madrid Odele Coddinggon, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder Guiliana de Toma, High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Ells Dutton, Global Monitoring Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Juan Fontenla, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder Joe Giacalone, University of Arizona Sarah Gibson, High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Douglas Gough, JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder Madhulika Guhathakurta, Living With a Star, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jerald Harder, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder V. Lynn Harvey, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder Lon Hood, University of Arizona Charles Jackman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Philip Judge, High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Farzad Kamalabadi, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Peter Kiedron, Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Hyosub Kil, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University Greg Kopp, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder Andrew Kren, University of Colorado, Boulder Hanli Liu, High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Jesse Lord, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder Dan Lubin, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego Janet Machol, National Geophysical Data Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Youhei Masada, Kyoto University, Japan Joe McInerney, High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Scott McIntosh, High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research 36

OCR for page 34
Aimee Merkel, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder Mark Miesch, High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Raimund Muscheler, Lund University, Sweden Seung Jun Oh, SELab, Inc. Ethan Peck, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder Jeffrey Pierce, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia Douglas Rabin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Cora Randall, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder Mark Rast, University of Colorado, Boulder Alan Robock, Rutgers University Fabrizio Sassi, Naval Research Laboratory Harlan Spence, University of New Hampshire Mark Stevens, University of Colorado, Denver Michael Thompson, High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Juri Toomre, JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder Thomas Woods, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder Lawrence Zanetti, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University National Research Council Staff Abigail Sheffer, Space Studies Board Michael Moloney, Space Studies Board and Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board Amanda Thibault, Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board Terri Baker, Space Studies Board 37