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B Speaker Biographical Sketches Anna Alberini, Ph.D., is associate professor of economics in the Depart- ment of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Mary- land, College Park. Her research interests are in environmental economics (including valuation of natural and nonmarket resources, estimation and valuation of health effects of environmental quality), energy economics, econometrics and statistics. Alberini has served as a co-editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, is serving on the editorial board of numerous environmental economics journals, and has served on the Science Advisory Board of the Environmental Protection Agency for Environmental Economics for two terms. She has participated in a number of research projects funded by the European Commission, and has done research for U.S. and Canadian government agencies. Dr. Alberini earned her Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, San Diego. John M. Antle, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at Oregon State University and a University Fellow at Resources for the Future. Dr. Antle previously served as professor at the University of California, Davis, and Montana State University. He was a senior staff economist for the President’s Council of Economic Advisers and served as a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. Dr. Antle is a fellow and past president of the American Agricultural Economics Association. His current research focuses on the sustainability of agricultural systems in industrialized and developing countries, including climate change impacts, adaptation, and mitigation in agriculture; assessment of environmental and social impacts 95

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96 EXPLORING HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL COSTS OF FOOD of agricultural technologies; and geologic carbon sequestration. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. Justin Derner, Ph.D., is research leader for the Rangeland Resources Re- search Unit of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service. Currently, Dr. Derner leads a multidisciplinary team of scientists developing and providing land managers with the necessary tools to address the interface of contemporary production-conservation issues related to provision of ecosystem goods and services on western U.S. range- lands. His research ascertains the effects of livestock as ecosystem engineers, alone or in combination with fire and prairie dogs, to influence vegetation heterogeneity, modify states of vegetation, and affect resilience within eco- logical sites of semiarid rangelands. Research efforts target management strategies for mitigation and adaptation of climate change on rangelands by evaluating dynamics of soil carbon and nitrogen as influenced by man- agement X environment (weather/climate) effects. Dr. Derner is a principal investigator for the Central Plains Experimental Range site of the Long- Term Agro-ecosystem Research network, a co–principal investigator on the National Science Foundation- (NSF-) funded Shortgrass Steppe Long-Term Ecological Research Project. In addition, he is an affiliate faculty member in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at the University of Wyoming and the Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship at Colorado State University. He received his Ph.D. in rangeland ecology and management from Texas A&M University. Michael P. Doyle, Ph.D., is a Regents Professor of Food Microbiology and director of the Center for Food Safety at the University of Georgia. He is an active researcher in the area of food safety and security and works closely with the food industry, government agencies, and consumer groups on is- sues related to the microbiological safety of foods. He serves on food safety committees of many scientific organizations and has been a scientific advi- sor to many groups, including the World Health Organization, Institute of Medicine (IOM), National Academy of Sciences (NAS)-NRC, International Life Sciences Institute-North America, Food and Drug Administration, USDA, Department of Defense, and Environmental Protection Agency. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, American Asso- ciation for the Advancement of Science, and International Association for Food Protection and the Institute of Food Technologists, and is a member of the IOM. Dr. Doyle received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin in bacteriology/food microbiology. Jonathan E. Fielding, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., is the director of the Los An- geles County Department of Public Health, and a professor at the Schools of Public Health and Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles.

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APPENDIX B 97 He previously served as co-director for the Center for Health Enhancement, Education and Research. He also chairs the Secretary of Health and Human Services’s expert advisory group on the 2020 Healthy People Project and the U.S. Community Preventive Services Task Force and is editor of the Annual Review of Public Health. His current research interests are health impact assessment and forecasting future health. He received his M.D. and M.P.H. from Harvard University and M.B.A. from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. Anne C. Haddix, Ph.D., is the senior policy advisor at the Centers for Dis- ease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Dr. Haddix co-founded and successfully cultivated Prevention Effectiveness as a scientific discipline at CDC, estab- lishing the first set of methodological guidelines for cost-effectiveness analy- sis of public health interventions. She also helped to create the Prevention Effectiveness Postdoctoral Fellowship program. Dr. Haddix is the author or co-author of numerous scientific publications, and editor of Prevention Effectiveness: A Guide to Decision Analysis and Economic Evaluation. Dr. Haddix received her Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Georgia and her M.S. in agricultural economics and B.A. in biology from California State University, Fresno. James K. Hammitt, Ph.D., is professor of economics and decision sci- ences at the Harvard School of Public Health and a visiting professor at the Toulouse School of Economics in France. Dr. Hammitt’s research and teaching concern the development of decision analysis, cost-benefit analy- sis, game theory, and other quantitative methods and their application to health and environmental policy in the United States and internationally. His research includes work on global climate change, the risks of pesticides and other contaminants in food, and the cost-effectiveness of air pollution control strategies. He also studies ways to measure the value of reduc- ing health risks, including monetary and health-adjusted life-year metrics. Dr. Hammitt previously served as a senior mathematician at the RAND Corporation and as the Pierre-de-Fermat Chair of the Toulouse School of Economics. He received his Ph.D. in public policy from Harvard University. Martin Heller, Ph.D., is a research specialist with the Center for Sustain- able Systems at the University of Michigan. Dr. Heller has conducted life cycle assessment studies of short-rotation woody biomass energy crops; a large-scale vertically integrated U.S. organic dairy (Aurora Organic Dairy); and as part of an international team, a comprehensive, spatially explicit study of U.S. dairy production for the Dairy Research Institute. He also developed a seminal report on life cycle–based sustainability in- dicators for assessment of the U.S. food system, published in Agricultural

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98 EXPLORING HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL COSTS OF FOOD Systems. Previously, as a researcher at the C.S. Mott Group for Sustain- able Food Systems at Michigan State University, Dr. Heller investigated the ecological services provided by pasture- and confinement-based dair- ies, and developed a “community food profile” intended to frame for a general audience the opportunities of a community-based food system. Dr. Heller received a B.S. in chemical engineering from Michigan State University and a Ph.D., also in chemical engineering, from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Sandra A. Hoffmann, Ph.D., is a senior economist with the Food Econom- ics Division of the USDA Economic Research Service. Her research focuses on food safety, valuation of the health benefits of public policies, and in- tegration of economic analysis and risk assessment. She is recognized for her research on the attribution of foodborne illness to its food sources and on childrens’ environmental health. She has advised the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on valuation of children’s benefits from environ- mental health programs. Sandy was a research fellow at Resources for the Future (2000-2010) and a faculty member at the University of Wisconsin- Madison (1999-2000). She also practiced pesticide and chemical manufac- ture regulatory law (1986-1989) and served with the U.S. Peace Corps in rural Chile (1980-1982). Sandy earned her Ph.D. from the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Berkeley, and her M.A. in agricultural economics from the University of Wisconsin– Madison. She also received her J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School. Gregory A. Keoleian, Ph.D., is the Peter M. Wege Endowed Professor of Sustainable Systems at the University of Michigan with appointments in the School of Natural Resources and Environment and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Dr. Keoleian serves as director of the Center for Sustainable Systems. His research focuses on the development and application of life cycle models and sustainability metrics to guide the design and improvement of products and technology including energy systems, transportation, buildings and infrastructure, consumer products and packaging, and a variety of food systems. The center has pioneered the development of methods in life cycle modeling to evaluate the sustainabil- ity performance of food systems. Dr. Keoleian is serving a 2-year term as president of the International Society for Industrial Ecology. He received his M.S.E. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan. Jayson Lusk, Ph.D., is a professor and Willard Sparks Endowed Chair in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Oklahoma State University.

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APPENDIX B 99 He previously served on faculty at Purdue University and Mississippi State University. Dr. Lusk has published more than 115 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals on topics related to economics, consumer behavior, and food marketing and policy. He serves on the editorial council for seven top academic journals, including the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and the Journal of Consumer Affairs. He is a former director of the Agri- cultural and Applied Economics Association. Dr. Lusk recently coauthored a book on consumer research methods, an undergraduate textbook on agricultural marketing and price analysis, and a book on the economics of animal welfare. He also coedited the Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Food Consumption and Policy. His forthcoming book, Food Police, is slated for publication in 2013. He earned his B.S. in food technology from Texas Tech University and his Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Kansas State University. Ricardo J. Salvador, Ph.D., is director and senior scientist in the Food and Environment Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. Earlier, he served as associate professor at Iowa State University, where he was the charter chair of the graduate program in sustainable agriculture. His spe- cializations range from drought resistance mechanisms in the maize crop to advanced crop production techniques and global food issues. Dr. Salvador previously served as a program officer for food, health, and well-being with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, where he managed the Foundation’s food system program. He earned his B.S. in general agriculture from the New Mexico State University and M.S. and Ph.D. in crop production from Iowa State University. Katherine (Kitty) Smith, Ph.D., is vice president of programs and chief economist at the American Farmland Trust. She oversees research and policy development, and administers programs concerning farmland pro- tection, food, agriculture, and the environment. Prior to joining American Farmland Trust, Dr. Smith served as administrator of the USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS). She has held numerous other leadership positions within the ERS, including director of the resource economics and market and trade economics divisions. Dr. Smith also served as the first director of policy studies, pioneering cutting-edge concepts such as “green payments” and whole-farm conservation planning with the Henry A. Wallace Institu- tion for Alternative Agriculture. She has served on several United Nations Expert Panels and chaired the Organization of International Cooperation and Development’s Joint Working Party on Agriculture and Environment. Her work has been published in books and scholarly journals throughout her career. Dr. Smith is a fellow of the Agricultural and Applied Economics

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100 EXPLORING HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL COSTS OF FOOD Association. She earned her B.S. in biological sciences and Ph.D. in agricul- tural and resource economics from the University of Maryland. Scott M. Swinton, Ph.D., is a professor and associate chair in the Depart- ment of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics at Michigan State University. His current research explores economic approaches to enhance the provision of ecosystem services from agriculture, including projects with the NSF’s long-term ecological research agroecological site in Michigan and the U.S. Department of Energy Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center. In addition to his U.S. activities, he has conducted research on farming systems and natural resource management while living in Africa and Latin America. Dr. Swinton served on the NAS panel on the status of pollinators and on several journal editorial boards, including the American Journal of Agricul- tural Economics and Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. He earned his B.A. in political science and economics from Swarthmore College, his M.S. in agricultural economics from Cornell University, and his Ph.D. in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Minnesota. Steven Wing, Ph.D., is an associate professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research and teaching are primarily in the areas of occupational and environmental health. Dr. Wing has conducted several studies of air pollution and health in communities near confined animal feeding operations. Dr. Wing received his Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.