TABLE A-1 Percentiles (PCTs) of Out-of-Pocket Total Burden, Elderly and Nonelderly Health Insurance Eligibility Units, Pooled Panels 10-12 (2008 dollars)

Poverty N PCT50 PCT75 PCT90
Overall
     Elderly 3,970 10.65 (0.25) 20.67 (0.60) 37.64 (1.35)
     Nonelderly 17,513 2.93 7.01 16.00
(0.05) (0.11) (0.41)
<100%
     Elderly 685 13.47 57.96 *
(2.14) (20.06)
     Nonelderly 3,260 2.74 19.09 *
(0.31) (1.51)
100-199%
     Elderly 1,134 16.53 27.93 43.07
(0.56) (1.27) (2.01)
     Nonelderly 3,849 2.58 9.04 20.36
(0.17) (0.32) (0.98)
200-399%
     Elderly 1,069 13.19 20.34 31.67
(0.45) (0.77) (1.77)
     Nonelderly 5,190 3.74 8.05 14.78
(0.12) (0.21) (0.46)
400%+
     Elderly 1,082 6.44 10.53 17.21
(0.21) (0.34) (0.83)
     Nonelderly 5,214 2.60 5.01 8.50
(0.05) (0.10) (0.20)

NOTE: Standard errors are in parentheses.

*Sample size is too small to make reliable estimates.

SOURCE: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey—Household Component, Panels 10-12.

$20,000 in net wealth at the median, and nonelderly families reported zero. Among low-income families (with family income between 100 and 199 percent of poverty), the median net assets for an elderly family was about 33 times as much as that for a nonelderly family ($77,000 versus $2,300).

Table A-3 presents four measures of burden. In the column labeled BURD10, we show the percentage of families who were spending 10 percent or more of family income on medical care. Overall, about 52 percent of elderly and 17 percent of nonelderly families had high burdens according to this threshold. In the next column, BURD20, we show that about 26 percent of elderly and 7 percent of nonelderly families spent 20 percent or more on medical care. In the final two columns, we use the same thresholds of 10 and 20 percent of family income, but we adjust the family income



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