insurance in the nongroup market, in which the tax treatment of premiums differs from the tax treatment in the employment-based market. There are other differences between the employed and the self-employed populations beyond the scope of this paper (Selden, 2008).

In conclusion, there does not appear to be any strong argument for incorporating the assets of self-employed families into their measure of resources. It is not clear that any special measurement procedures are needed to account for the health care burdens faced by this group, although a narrower definition of self-employment might reach different conclusions.

ANNEX TABLE A-1 Percentiles (PCTs) of Burdens for Self-Employed, Employed Nonelderly Health Insurance Eligibility Units, Pooled Panels 10-12

N PCT50 PCT75 PCT90
Overall
     Self-employed 2,069 3.32 8.11 17.15
(0.16) (0.33) (0.80)
     Employed 15,444 2.86 6.81 15.69
(0.06) (0.11) (0.45)
<100% Poverty
     Self-employed 213 2.44 22.64 *
(1.40) (9.40)
     Employed 3,047 2.74 19.00 *
(0.32) (1.39)
100-199% Poverty
     Self-employed 406 3.34 12.62 27.23
(0.65) (1.60) (3.57)
     Employed 3,443 2.49 8.59 19.67
(0.17) (0.34) (0.87)
200-399% Poverty
     Self-employed 606 4.23 9.93 17.91
(0.48) (0.64) (1.03)
     Employed 4,584 3.69 7.85 14.37
(0.12) (0.21) (0.42)
400%+ Poverty Self-employed 844 3.03 6.55 11.01
(0.15) (0.32) (0.66)
     Employed 4,370 2.51 4.80 8.01
(0.06) (0.10) (0.23)

NOTE: Standard errors are in parentheses.

*Sample size is too small to make reliable estimates.
SOURCE: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey—Household Component, Panels 10-12.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement