Appendix A

Biographical Sketches of the Panel for Review of Best Practices in Research and Development Organizations

JOHN W. LYONS (NAE), Chair, is a Distinguished Research Fellow at the Center for Technology and National Security Policy at the National Defense University. In 1993, he was appointed the first permanent director of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). At ARL he managed a broad array of science and technology programs: electronics, information science and technology, armor/armaments, soldier systems, air and ground vehicle technology, and survivability/lethality analysis. In 1990, Dr. Lyons was appointed Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He has received the Department of Commerce Gold Medal and the Department of the Army’s Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service. He has published 4 books and more than 60 papers, and he holds a dozen patents. Dr. Lyons also has served on many boards and commissions. He received his A.B. degree from Harvard University and his A.M. and Ph.D. degrees from Washington University, all in chemistry.

EDWARD A. BROWN is a Principal Staff Member in the Center for Integrated Intelligence Systems of the MITRE Corporation, where he is concentrating on innovative techniques for assisting member organizations of the intelligence community (IC) in the management of their science and technology (S&T) programs. His expertise spans the broad area of managing government S&T enterprises. He went to MITRE after a 33-year career as a government employee within the Army’s research and development (R&D) community. One of his final assignments as a civil servant was as a member of the Director of Central Intelligence’s Strategic S&T Management Task Force, which was chartered to develop new techniques for managing the IC’s S&T enterprise. Dr. Brown is now assisting the IC to implement the results of the task force work in his current position with MITRE. He has supported S&T management improvement efforts in a variety of government agencies and served for 4 years on the Army Laboratory Assessment Group reporting to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology. Before arriving at MITRE, he was the Director for Special Projects at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL). In that position he supported the ARL Director in administering and coordinating activities relevant to the management of both the laboratory and its technical program. He was responsible for much of ARL’s groundbreaking work in performance measurement and business planning as it applies to R&D organizations. For his work in innovative R&D management, Dr. Brown was awarded the Army’s Superior Civilian Service Award. Dr. Brown received his bachelor's degree from Washington and Lee University and his master’s and doctoral degrees from New York University, all in physics.

W. WARNER BURKE is Edward Lee Thorndike Professor of Psychology and Education Program Coordinator, Graduate Programs in Social-Organizational Psychology, and Chair of the Department of Organization and Leadership, Teachers College, Columbia University. He is currently engaged in teaching, research, and consulting. He teaches leadership, organizational dynamics and theory, and organization change and consultation. His research focuses on multirater feedback, leadership, and organization change. Dr. Burke’s consulting experience has



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of the Panel for Review of Best Practices in Research and Development Organizations JOHN W. LYONS (NAE), Chair, is a Distinguished Research Fellow at the Center for Technology and National Security Policy at the National Defense University. In 1993, he was appointed the first permanent director of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). At ARL he managed a broad array of science and technology programs: electronics, information science and technology, armor/armaments, soldier systems, air and ground vehicle technology, and survivability/lethality analysis. In 1990, Dr. Lyons was appointed Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He has received the Department of Commerce Gold Medal and the Department of the Army's Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service. He has published 4 books and more than 60 papers, and he holds a dozen patents. Dr. Lyons also has served on many boards and commissions. He received his A.B. degree from Harvard University and his A.M. and Ph.D. degrees from Washington University, all in chemistry. EDWARD A. BROWN is a Principal Staff Member in the Center for Integrated Intelligence Systems of the MITRE Corporation, where he is concentrating on innovative techniques for assisting member organizations of the intelligence community (IC) in the management of their science and technology (S&T) programs. His expertise spans the broad area of managing government S&T enterprises. He went to MITRE after a 33-year career as a government employee within the Army's research and development (R&D) community. One of his final assignments as a civil servant was as a member of the Director of Central Intelligence's Strategic S&T Management Task Force, which was chartered to develop new techniques for managing the IC's S&T enterprise. Dr. Brown is now assisting the IC to implement the results of the task force work in his current position with MITRE. He has supported S&T management improvement efforts in a variety of government agencies and served for 4 years on the Army Laboratory Assessment Group reporting to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology. Before arriving at MITRE, he was the Director for Special Projects at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL). In that position he supported the ARL Director in administering and coordinating activities relevant to the management of both the laboratory and its technical program. He was responsible for much of ARL's groundbreaking work in performance measurement and business planning as it applies to R&D organizations. For his work in innovative R&D management, Dr. Brown was awarded the Army's Superior Civilian Service Award. Dr. Brown received his bachelor's degree from Washington and Lee University and his master's and doctoral degrees from New York University, all in physics. W. WARNER BURKE is Edward Lee Thorndike Professor of Psychology and Education Program Coordinator, Graduate Programs in Social-Organizational Psychology, and Chair of the Department of Organization and Leadership, Teachers College, Columbia University. He is currently engaged in teaching, research, and consulting. He teaches leadership, organizational dynamics and theory, and organization change and consultation. His research focuses on multirater feedback, leadership, and organization change. Dr. Burke's consulting experience has 47

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been with a variety of organizations in business-industry, education, government, religion, medical systems, and professional services firms, and he has served as senior adviser to the strategy and organization change practice of IBM Global Business Services. Prior to his move to Teachers College, Dr. Burke was professor of management and chair of the Department of Management at Clark University. Previously he had been an independent consultant as well as serving in various other capacities. Dr. Burke is the author of more than 150 articles and book chapters on organization development, training, change and organizational psychology, and conference planning; he has contributed as an author, co-author, editor, and/or co-editor of 19 books. His most recent (2011) book, published by Sage, is Organization Change: Theory and Practice, Third Edition. He received his B.A. from Furman University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. ROSS B. COROTIS (NAE), PE, is Denver Business Challenge Professor of Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has research interests in the application of probabilistic concepts and decision perceptions for civil engineering problems, and in particular their application to societal trade-offs for hazards in the built infrastructure. His current research emphasizes the coordinated roles of engineering and social science with respect to framing and communicating societal investments for long-term risks and resiliency. Dr. Corotis was on the faculty at Northwestern University for 11 years; established the Department of Civil Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University, where he was also the Associate Dean of Engineering; and was the Dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has numerous research, teaching, and service awards; chaired several committees on structural safety for the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and the American Concrete Institute (ACI); served as editor of the international journal Structural Safety and the ASCE Journal of Engineering Mechanics; and chaired the Executive Committee of the International Association for Structural Safety and Reliability. For the National Research Council, he served on the Building Research Board and the steering committee of the Disasters Roundtable, and he chaired the Panel on Assessment of the NIST Building and Fire Research Laboratory. He is the founding chair of the Committee on NIST Technical Programs and past Chair of the Civil Engineering Section of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Corotis is a registered professional engineer in Illinois, Maryland, and Colorado; a registered structural engineer in Illinois; and a Distinguished Member of ASCE. He is the author of more than 200 publications. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). WILLIAM W. CRAIG is the Director of Laboratory Directed Research and Development in the Institutional Science and Technology Office at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Payload Manager for the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the Aerospace Program Manager at the University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley. Dr. Craig previously served in the following positions: Deputy Director, Institutional Science and Technology Office, LLNL; Chief Scientist, Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate, LLNL; Technical Advisor in the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Group Leader at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University; and in a number of other positions at LLNL and at the Columbia Astrophysics 48

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Laboratory, Columbia University. Dr. Craig received his B.A. and M.S. degrees in physics and his Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of California, Berkeley. C. WILLIAM GEAR (NAE) is Senior Scientist, Chemical Engineering, at Princeton University and President Emeritus of the NEC Research Institute. Dr. Gear's National Academy of Engineering (NAE) citation is for "seminal work in methods and software for solving classes of differential equations and differential-algebraic equations of significance in applications." His primary interest is scientific computation, particularly involving differential equations, and even more specifically, stiff equations and differential-algebraic equations. More recently he has become interested in numerical techniques applied to computer vision. Dr. Gear received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from Cambridge University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, all in mathematics. WESLEY L. HARRIS (NAE) is the Charles Stark Draper Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Director of the Lean Sustainment Initiative at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Before his appointment as Associate Provost, Dr. Harris served as head of MIT's Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics from 2003 to 2008. From 1972 to 1985, he taught and held several administrative positions at MIT. Dr. Harris served as Dean of the School of Engineering at the University of Connecticut from 1985 to 1990, and as Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer of the University of Tennessee Space Institute from 1990 to 1993. As NASA's associate administrator for aeronautics from 1993 to 1995, he was responsible for all programs, facilities, and personnel in aeronautics at NASA. He earned his B.S. in aerospace engineering at the University of Virginia and his M.A. and Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences at Princeton University, on whose board of trustees he later served. ELENI KOUSVELARI is a Senior Scientist at the Biological and Materials Sciences Center, Sandia National Laboratories. She is an expert in the direction and organization of bioengineering and translational research. Before joining Sandia National Laboratories, she was the Associate Director for Biotechnology and Innovation at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Before that, she held a number of positions at the NIDCR, including Acting Director of the Center for Biotechnology and Innovation, Acting Program Director and Program Director for a variety of programs, and Chief of the Cellular and Molecular Biology, Physiology and Biotechnology Branch and the Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Tissue Engineering Branch. Before her service at NIH, Dr. Kousvelari held a number of positions at the School of Dentistry at Temple University, the School of Dental Medicine at the University of Connecticut, and the School of Graduate Dentistry at Boston University. She has received numerous awards and is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, International Association for Dental Research, American Society of Cell Biology, Society of Biomaterials, and American Dental Association. Dr. Kousvelari received her D.D.S. degree from the Athens University Medical and Dental School, her M.Sc./C.A.G.S.P. degree in prosthodontics from the Boston University School of Graduate Dentistry, and her D.Sc. in oral biology from the Boston University School of Graduate Dentistry. BERNARD S. MEYERSON (NAE) is the Vice President for Innovation at IBM, and he leads IBM's Global University Relations Function within IBM's Corporate Headquarters organization. 49

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He is also responsible for the IBM Academy, a self-governed organization of 800 executives and senior technical leaders from across IBM, having been appointed to this position in December 2005. In 1980, Dr. Meyerson joined IBM Research as a staff member, leading the development of silicon, germanium, and other high-performance technologies over a period of 10 years. In 1992, he was appointed an IBM Fellow by IBM's Chairman, and in 2003 he assumed operational responsibility for IBM's global semiconductor research and development efforts. In that role Dr. Meyerson led the world's largest semiconductor development consortium--members being IBM, Sony, Toshiba, AMD, Samsung, Chartered Semiconductor, and Infineon. He has received numerous awards for his work. Dr. Meyerson was cited as Inventor of the Year by the New York State Legislature in 1998 and was recognized as United States Distinguished Inventor of the Year by the U.S. IP Law Association and the Patent and Trademark Office in 1999. He was most recently recognized in May 2008 as Inventor of the Year by the New York State Intellectual Property Law Association. He has published more than 180 papers and owns more than 40 patents. Dr. Meyerson has a Ph.D. in physics from the City College of New York. ELSA REICHMANIS (NAE) is a professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her National Academy of Engineering (NAE) citation is for "the discovery, development, and engineering leadership of new families of lithographic materials and processes that enable VLSI [very large scale integration] manufacturing." Her research is at the interface of chemistry, materials science, optics, electronics, and engineering, spanning the range from fundamental concept to technology development and implementation. Her research is focused on organic and polymer materials design for electronic and photonic applications. She is experienced in leading cross-cultural, multidisciplinary research teams and in generating value for intellectual property through patent and technology license agreements. Dr. Reichmanis has published extensively; has organized national and international workshops, symposia, and conferences; and has mentored students and post-doctoral fellows and taught courses. She has received numerous awards and has more than 150 publications, more than 15 patents, and 5 books to her credit. Dr. Reichmanis received her B.S. in chemistry and her Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Syracuse University. JOEL M. SCHNUR is a professor in the College of Science at George Mason University (GMU). Dr. Schnur retired from the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in 2008. His role at GMU is to stimulate new science of "impact" across department lines in GMU's College of Science and to initiate collaborations in the College of Engineering. As Director of the Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering at NRL, Dr. Schnur provided scientific direction and management in the areas of complex bio/molecular systems with the aim of modifying structures in ways that will lead to the development of useful devices, techniques, and systems of use for the Navy and the Department of Defense. Dr. Schnur's research interests focus on understanding the relationship between the structure of molecules and observed macroscopic phenomena. This interest has led to his publications in the areas of critical phenomena, liquid crystals, picosecond spectroscopy, high-pressure and shock-related phenomena, self-assembly of biologically derived microstructures, and, recently, bio-based power sources bioinformatics, systems biology, and genomics. Dr. Schnur has more than 150 publications and issued patents, which have led to more than 3,000 citations; 20 of his more than 40 patents have produced or are currently producing royalties. He received his A.B. in chemistry from Rutgers University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Georgetown University. 50

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LYLE H. SCHWARTZ (NAE) retired from government service in 2004, after 18 years as a member of the Senior Executive Service. In his last position, as Director of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), he guided the management of the entire basic research investment for the U.S. Air Force. He led a staff of more than 200 scientists, engineers, and support people in Arlington, Virginia, and two foreign technology offices, in London and Tokyo. As Director, he was charged with maintaining the technological superiority of the Air Force. Each year, AFOSR selects, sponsors, and manages revolutionary basic research relevant to Air Force needs. The investment of AFOSR in basic research programs is distributed across 300 academic institutions, 145 industry contracts, and more than 150 research efforts within the Air Force Research Laboratory. Prior to becoming AFOSR's Director, Dr. Schwartz directed the AFOSR's Aerospace and Materials Sciences Directorate. From 1984 to 1997, he served as Director of the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. In that position, he managed programs in both structural and functional materials, with research emphasis ranging from basic to applied. From 1989 to 1997, he led the multiagency materials research coordination committee for the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and was responsible for the development of the Presidential Initiative on Advanced Materials and Processing launched in 1991. Previously, he taught and served as Director of the Materials Research Center at Northwestern University. He has written more than 85 technical papers and is a co-author of two textbooks in materials science and engineering. He received his B.S. in science engineering and Ph.D. in materials science from Northwestern University. 51