F
Biographical Information




Committee Members

Lonnie King, D.V.M. (Chair), is dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine and executive dean for the Health Science Colleges at the Ohio State University. Earlier, King was the director of the National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne and Enteric Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Before serving as director, King was the first chief of the CDC’s Office of Strategy and Innovation. King has also served as dean of the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine for 10 years. Prior to this, King was the administrator for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. He served as the country’s chief veterinary officer for 5 years and worked extensively in global trade agreements within the North American Free Trade Agreement and the World Trade Organization. He has served as president of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges and was the vice chair for the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues. King received his B.S. and D.V.M. degrees from Ohio State University, an M.S. in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota, and an M.P.A. from American University. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine.

Jonathan Carlson, Ph.D., is a researcher in the eScience group at Microsoft Research, where he studies viral evolution, immunology, and vaccine design through statistical modeling. His models of viral escape have achieved broad recognition in the HIV community, where they have led to the discovery of novel viral–host interactions, insights into mechanisms of



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F Biographical Information Committee Members Lonnie King, D.V.M. (Chair), is dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine and executive dean for the Health Science Colleges at the Ohio State Uni- versity. Earlier, King was the director of the National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne and Enteric Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Before serving as director, King was the first chief of the CDC’s Office of Strategy and Innovation. King has also served as dean of the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine for 10 years. Prior to this, King was the administrator for the U.S. Department of Agri- culture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. He served as the country’s chief veterinary officer for 5 years and worked extensively in global trade agreements within the North American Free Trade Agreement and the World Trade Organization. He has served as president of the Asso- ciation of American Veterinary Medical Colleges and was the vice chair for the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues. King received his B.S. and D.V.M. degrees from Ohio State University, an M.S. in epide- miology from the University of Minnesota, and an M.P.A. from American University. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Jonathan Carlson, Ph.D., is a researcher in the eScience group at Microsoft Research, where he studies viral evolution, immunology, and vaccine design through statistical modeling. His models of viral escape have achieved broad recognition in the HIV community, where they have led to the discovery of novel viral–host interactions, insights into mechanisms of 127

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128 RANKING VACCINES: A Prioritization Software Tool natural immune control, and the identification of vaccine candidates that are slated for clinical trials. He has served on advisory panels for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immu- nology. Carlson received his B.A. from Dartmouth, where he was awarded the top senior thesis prizes in both biology and computer science, and his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Washington, where he was awarded the university’s distinguished dissertation award and was a finalist for the U.S. Council of Graduate Schools’ dissertation award for his work on HIV adaptation. Paul Citron, M.S.E.E., retired as vice president of technology policy and academic relations from Medtronic, Inc., after a 32-year career there. His previous positions there included vice president of science and technol- ogy, vice president of ventures technology, and both vice president and director of applied concepts research. He is currently a senior fellow at the William J. von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology and an adjunct professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego. Citron received a B.S. in electrical engineering from Drexel University and an M.S. in electrical engineering from the Uni- versity of Minnesota. He has authored many publications, has served on several committees of the National Academies, and holds several medical device pacing-related patents. Citron was elected a founding fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering and has twice won the American College of Cardiology Governor’s Award for Excellence and was inducted as a fellow of the Medtronic Bakken Society, the com- pany’s highest technical honor. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Rita Colwell, Ph.D., is a distinguished university professor both at the University of Maryland at College Park and at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her interests are focused on global infectious diseases, water, and health, and she is currently developing an international network to address emerging infectious diseases and water issues, including safe drinking water for both the developed and developing world. Colwell has shown how changes in climate, adverse weather events, shifts in ocean circulation, and other ecological processes can create condi- tions that allow infectious diseases to spread. In addition to her academic roles, Colwell is senior adviser and chairperson emeritus of Canon U.S. Life Sciences and chairman and president of CosmosID, which is exploring the potential applications of molecular diagnostic technologies to the field of life sciences.  Colwell served as the 11th director of the National Science

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Appendix F 129 Foundation from 1998 to 2004. Colwell has previously served as chairman of the board of governors of the American Academy of Microbiology and as president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Washington Academy of Sciences, the American Society for Microbiol- ogy, the Sigma Xi National Science Honorary Society, the American Insti- tute of Biological Sciences, and the International Union of Microbiological Societies. Colwell has been awarded 56 honorary degrees from institutions of higher education, including her alma mater, Purdue University. Colwell holds a B.S. in bacteriology, an M.S. in genetics from Purdue University, and a Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Washington. Colwell is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Society of Canada, the Royal Irish Academy, and the American Philosophical Society. She is the recipient of the Order of the Rising Sun bestowed by the emperor of Japan, the Stockholm Water Prize awarded by the king of Sweden, and the National Medal of Science bestowed by the president of the United States. She is a U.S. science envoy and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Kathryn Edwards, M.D., is the Sarah H. Sell Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt University School of Medi- cine. As a graduate of the University of Iowa College Of Medicine, Edwards was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha. She completed her pediatric resi- dency and fellowship in infectious diseases at Children’s Memorial Hospi- tal, Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois, and then served as a postdoctoral fellow and instructor in immunology at Rush Medical School, Presbyterian St. Luke’s Hospital, also in Chicago. She next joined the faculty of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nash- ville, Tennessee, where she has remained and risen in the ranks to profes- sor and director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Research Program. Edwards has spent much of her career evaluating the safety and effectiveness of vac- cines. As a member of both the Centers for Disease Control and Preven- tion (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Vaccines and Related Products Advisory Committee, she has played a critical role in recommending new vaccines for licensure and establishing guidelines for their use. She has also been a frequent advisor to the U.S. National Institutes of Health, where she was a member of the advisory council of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and to the CDC in improving ways to evaluate vaccines and to ensure their safety. Edwards served on numerous data safety and monitoring boards for national and international trials in high-risk groups

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130 RANKING VACCINES: A Prioritization Software Tool such as pregnant women, infants, children, and members of developing nations. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dennis Fryback, Ph.D., is professor emeritus of population health sciences and industrial and systems engineering at the University of Wisconsin– Madison. He specializes in methodological issues underpinning medical decision making, cost-effectiveness analysis of health care interventions, and health policy. Fryback was a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and also of the U.S. Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine, two working groups that have been influential for national pol- icy on comparative effectiveness research methods in health care. Among other honors he has received the Career Achievement Award of the Society for Medical Decision Making, which he helped to found more than 30 years ago. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Glenda Gray, M.B.B.Ch., is executive director of the Perinatal HIV Research Unit and associate professor of pediatrics at University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. She is based at the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, where she is the principal investigator of the Soweto Clinical Trials Unit. She has expertise in the field of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, adolescent HIV prevention and treatment, and HIV vaccine and microbicide research. She has received the Femina “Woman of the Nine- ties” award, Nelson Mandela Health and Human Rights award, and Inter- national Association of Physicians Against AIDS’s “Hero of Medicine” award for her research contributions. Gray received her medical degree from the University of Witwatersrand and was a fellow of College of Phy- sicians of South Africa in pediatrics. She was awarded a Fogarty Training Fellowship at Columbia University and completed an intensive program in clinical epidemiology at Cornell University. She is a member of the Acad- emy of Science in South Africa and a member of the Institute of Medicine. Michel Guillot, Ph.D., is an associate professor of sociology at the Uni- versity of Pennsylvania and a research associate at its Population Studies Center. He is a demographer specializing in the areas of formal demogra- phy and population health. Initially trained in France, Guillot obtained a Ph.D. in demography and sociology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2000. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the Harvard Center for Population and Development, he joined the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin and subsequently returned to the University of Pennsylvania as a faculty member. In the area of formal demography, Guillot’s research

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Appendix F 131 deals with designing new approaches for measuring population health and understanding population dynamics. Victoria Hale, Ph.D., is founder, former chief executive officer, and chair emeritus of OneWorld Health, the first nonprofit pharmaceutical company in the United States. Under her leadership the organization developed a new cure for visceral leishmaniasis and developed a platform technology to reduce the cost of malaria drugs by more than tenfold. Presently Hale is founder and chief executive officer of Medicines360, a second-generation nonprofit pharmaceutical company. Their first product is a hormonal inter- uterine device, currently in Phase 3 clinical trials in the United States. Hale established her expertise in all stages of biopharmaceutical drug devel- opment at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and at Genentech, Inc. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of California, San Francisco, where she maintains an adjunct associate professorship in biomedical engineering and therapeutic sciences. Her honors include being named a MacArthur Fellow and receiving the President’s Award of Distinction from the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists and the Economist’s Social and Economic Innovation Award. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Joseph Jasinski, Ph.D., is an IBM Distinguished Engineer and the Global Industry Executive for Smarter Healthcare and Life Sciences at IBM Research. In this role he is responsible for developing strategies and coor- dinating research efforts across IBM’s Research Division in areas ranging from the use of information technology in payer/provider health care to computational studies in molecular biology. Prior to his current position, Jasinski was worldwide operations manager for IBM Life Sciences, where he was responsible for day-to-day operations and strategy for one of IBM’s fastest growing new businesses. He has also served as the senior manager of the Computational Biology Center at IBM Research and managed and carried out research in nanotechnology, materials chemistry, and chemi- cal kinetics in his career with IBM. Jasinski graduated from Dartmouth College with an A.B. in mathematics and chemistry and received a Ph.D. in chemistry from Stanford University, where he held a National Science Foundation pre-doctoral fellowship. Following postdoctoral work at the University of California, Berkeley, he joined the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center as a research staff member in 1982. Jasinski is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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132 RANKING VACCINES: A Prioritization Software Tool Tracy Lieu, M.D., M.P.H., is director of the Division of Research at Kaiser Permanente Northern California. She was previously a professor of popula- tion medicine and of pediatrics and director of the Center for Child Health Care Studies at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute. Lieu has studied vaccine safety, delivery, and economics for almost two decades and has published many papers about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of immunization programs. Her research includes the seminal cost-effectiveness analyses of varicella vaccine and pneumo- coccal conjugate vaccine for children, conducted with collaborators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Kaiser Perma- nente Northern California. She has served as senior investigator of several related evaluations of the economic impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination, including an economic impact evaluation for PneumoADIP. In addition to carrying out research, Lieu serves as the Children’s Hospi- tal Boston site director of the Harvard Pediatric Health Services Research Fellowship, teaches in the Harvard School of Public Health, and practices pediatrics part time with Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates. She was a member of CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the expert group that issues authoritative recommendations on vaccine use in the United States. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Charles Phelps, Ph.D., is a university professor and provost emeritus at the University of Rochester. Phelps began his research career at the RAND Cor- poration, where he served as senior staff economist and director of the Pro- gram on Regulatory Policies and Institutions. At RAND Phelps’s research included the economics of health care, U.S. petroleum price regulations, water markets in California, and environmental regulatory policy. In 1984 Phelps moved to the University of Rochester, where he held appointments in the Departments of Economics and Political Science and served as direc- tor of the Public Policy Analysis Program and chair of the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine in the School of Medicine and Den- tistry. He served as provost of the University of Rochester from 1994 to 2007. Phelps’s research cuts across the fields of health economics, health policy, medical decision analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis of various medical interventions, and other related topics. He wrote a leading text- book in the field, Health Economics (Addison Wesley, now in its fifth edi- tion), and Eight Questions You Should Ask About Our Health Care System— Even if the Answers Make You Sick (Hoover Institution Press). Phelps has testified before congressional committees on health policy and intellectual property issues. He serves on the board of directors of VirtualScopics, Inc. and as a consultant to Gilead Sciences, Inc., and CardioDx. He is a founding

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Appendix F 133 member of the Health Care Task Force of the Hoover Institution at Stan- ford University. He received his B.A. in mathematics from Pomona College and an M.B.A. in hospital administration and a Ph.D. in business economics from the University of Chicago. Phelps is a fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a member of the Institute of Medicine. Rino Rappuoli, Ph.D., is global head of vaccines research for Novartis Vac- cines. Previously he was chief scientific officer and vice president of vac- cines research at Chiron Corporation. Rino joined IRIS, the Chiron S.p.A. Research Institute, in 1992 and attained various leadership positions in vaccine discovery and research within the company. Prior to that, he was a head of the Laboratory of Bacterial Vaccines at the Sclavo Research Center and a visiting scientist at Harvard Medical School and the Rockefeller Insti- tute. He is the author of more than 500 original papers in peer-reviewed journals and has served as a reviewer for numerous scientific publications. Rappuoli obtained his doctoral degree in biological sciences at the Univer- sity of Siena, delivering his experimental thesis on the use of nuclear mag- netic resonance imaging in biological systems. Rappuoli has been awarded the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize, the Gold Medal by the president of Italy for contributions to public health, the Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Institute of Human Virology, and the Excellence Award from the European Society of Clini- cal Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Arthur Reingold, M.D., is Edward Penhoet Distinguished Professor of Global Health and Infectious Diseases at the School of Public Health, Uni- versity of California, Berkeley (UCB). He is also a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics and a clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). His research interests include emerging and reemerging infections and vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States and developing countries. Reingold serves as vice-chair of the World Health Organization’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on vaccines and vaccine policy. He is also director of the California Emerging Infections Program and of the U.S. National Institutes of Health Fogarty AIDS Inter- national Training and Research Program at UCB/UCSF. His recent publi- cations include articles on the impact of the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the United States and related topics. Before joining the faculty at UCB, Reingold worked for 8 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine.

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134 RANKING VACCINES: A Prioritization Software Tool Edward Shortliffe, M.D., Ph.D., is a professor at Arizona State Univer- sity, adjunct professor of biomedical informatics at Columbia University, and a scholar in residence at the New York Academy of Medicine. Previ- ously, he served as president and chief executive officer of the American Medical Informatics Association. He has also served on the faculty of the University of Texas Health Science Center and the University of Arizona College of Medicine. Before that he was the Rolf A. Scholdager Professor and chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Columbia Uni- versity College of Physicians and Surgeons and professor of medicine and of computer science at Stanford University. He received his A.B. in applied mathematics from Harvard College and a Ph.D. in medical information sci- ences and an M.D. from Stanford University. His research interests include the broad range of issues related to integrated decision-support systems, their effective implementation, and the role of the Internet in health care. He is a master of the American College of Physicians and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Biomedical Informatics. Shortliffe is a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics and the American Association for Artificial Intelligence and an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Robert Steinglass, M.P.H., is an immunization team leader for the Mater- nal and Child Health Integrated Program at John Snow, Inc., and the proj- ect director for the Africa Routine Immunization System Essentials at John Snow Research and Training Institute, Inc. Steinglass received his M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Pub- lic Health and has led immunization projects for John Snow, Inc., since 1990. In this capacity and in partnership with global, regional, and coun- try partners, he has overseen the technical agenda and implementation of a series of projects funded by the U.S. Agency for International Develop- ment that are engaged primarily in strengthening routine immunization program performance, introducing new vaccines, and controlling vaccine- preventable diseases. Steinglass has served in leadership positions on IMMUNIZATIONbasics, BASICS II, BASICS, REACH II, and REACH at John Snow, Inc. Steinglass began his career in smallpox eradication for the World Health Organization (WHO) in Ethiopia and Yemen and served for 10 years as the resident WHO technical officer for the Expanded Program on Immunization in Yemen, Oman, and Nepal. Steinglass’s immunization work has taken him to nearly 50 developing and transitional countries. His recent and current involvement at the global level includes work in such areas as the epidemiology of the unimmunized child, the role of gender

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Appendix F 135 and sex in immunization, the effect of new vaccine introduction on immu- nization systems and health systems, and the feasibility of measles eradica- tion. He is a member of WHO’s Immunization Practices Advisory Commit- tee, the Vaccine Presentation and Packaging Advisory Group, the Program Advisory Group of Project Optimize, and the Cold Chain and Logistics Task Team. He recently led one of the delivery working groups for the Decade of Vaccines and advised both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and WHO on their global immunization implementation research agenda. Oyewale Tomori, D.V.M., Ph.D., is vice-chancellor emeritus and professor at Redeemer’s University in Nigeria. Tomori received his D.V.M. from the Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, and his Ph.D. in virology from the Univer- sity of Ibadan. Tomori’s research interests include a wide range of human viruses as well as zoonotic and veterinary viruses, including the yellow fever virus, the Lassa fever virus, the poliomyelitis virus, the measles virus, the Ebola virus, and a hitherto unknown virus, the Orungo virus, which he elucidated the properties of and registered with the International Com- mittee of Virus Taxonomy. He served as head of the department of virol- ogy at the University of Ibadan, and he was later appointed as the regional virologist for the World Health Organization (WHO) Africa Region. During his 10-year tenure with WHO, he set up the African Regional Polio Labo- ratory Network, consisting of 16 laboratories, which provides diagnos- tic support to the global polio eradication initiative. In addition, Tomori has served on several WHO advisory committees and expert groups. He received the Nigerian National Order of Merit, the country’s highest award for academic and intellectual attainment and national development, and the Nigeria National Ministry of Science and Technology Merit Award for excellence in medical research. Tomori is a fellow of the Academy of Sci- ence of Nigeria, a fellow of the College of Veterinary Surgeons of Nigeria, and a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists of the United Kingdom. He is president of the Nigerian Academy of Sciences. Detlof von Winterfeldt, Ph.D., is a professor of industrial and systems engineering at the Viterbi School of Engineering at the University of South- ern California (USC). He also holds appointments as professor of public policy at the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy. He served as director of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Austria and co- founded and directed the National Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events, the first university-based Center of Excellence funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. His research interests are in the foundation and practice of decision and risk analysis as applied to

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136 RANKING VACCINES: A Prioritization Software Tool the areas of technology development, environmental risks, natural haz- ards, and terrorism. He has served on many committees and panels of the National Science Foundation and the National Academies. He is an elected fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sci- ences (INFORMS) and of the Society for Risk Analysis. He has received the Ramsey Medal for distinguished contributions to decision analysis from the Decision Analysis Society of INFORMS, the Gold Medal from the International Society for Multicriteria Decision Making for advancing the field, and the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Society for Risk Analysis. Staff Guruprasad Madhavan, Ph.D. (Study Director), is a senior program offi- cer with the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice at the Institute of Medicine. He is also a senior program officer for the Commit- tee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy—a joint unit of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. Madhavan received his M.S. and Ph.D. in biomedical engi- neering and an M.B.A. from the State University of New York (SUNY). He has worked in the medical device industry as a research scientist develop- ing cardiac surgical catheters for ablation therapy. Madhavan has received a number of awards, including the  AT&T Leadership Award,  the SUNY Chancellor’s Promising Inventor Award, the Institution of Engineering and Technology’s Mike Sargeant Career Achievement Award, the Ameri- can College of Clinical Engineering’s Thomas O’Dea Advocacy Award, the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers’ Robert Stew- art Engineering–Humanities Award, the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation’s AAMI–Becton Dickinson Award for Profes- sional Achievement, the District of Columbia Council on Engineering and Architectural Societies’ Young Engineer of the Year Award, and the IEEE– USA Professional Achievement Award. Madhavan is a founding member of the Global Young Academy, and has co-edited four books. He has also been named as one of the “New Faces of Engineering” in USA Today, and as a distinguished young scientist by the World Economic Forum. Kinpritma Sangha, M.P.H., is a research associate with the Board on Pop- ulation Health and Public Health Practice at the Institute of Medicine. She has worked at the National Women’s Law Center as well as the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. She previously served as a research assistant in the University of California, Davis, Medical Center’s Pediatric

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Appendix F 137 Emergency Care Applied Research Network. She received her B.S. in cellu- lar and molecular biology and Asian American studies from the University of California, Davis, and an M.P.H. in health policy from George Washing- ton University. Angela Martin, B.S., is a senior program assistant with the Board on Popu- lation Health and Public Health Practice at the Institute of Medicine. She previously worked with the Board on Army Science and Technology at the National Research Council. She received a B.S. degree in psychology with a minor in English from the University of Maryland University College. She received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Navy after serving 6 years on active duty and is currently an inactive member of the U.S. Air Force Reserves, where she serves as a flight attendant on distinguished visitor airlifts. Rose Marie Martinez, Sc.D., is senior director of the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice at the Institute of Medicine. Under her leadership, the board has examined such topics as the safety of childhood vaccines, pandemic influenza preparedness, the revival of civilian immuni- zation against smallpox, the health effect of environmental exposures, the capacity of governmental public health to respond to health crises, systems for evaluating and ensuring drug safety postmarketing, the soundness and ethical conduct of clinical trials to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS, and chronic disease prevention, among others. Prior to join- ing the Institute of Medicine, Martinez was a senior health researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, where she conducted research on the impact of health system change on the public health infrastructure, access to care for vulnerable populations, managed care, and the health care workforce. Martinez is a former assistant director for health financing and policy with the U.S. General Accounting Office, where she directed evaluations and policy analysis in the area of national and public health issues. Her experience also includes 6 years directing research studies for the Regional Health Ministry of Madrid, Spain. Martinez received her Sc.D. from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, and the Cecil Award, the highest distinction for a staff member of the Institute of Medicine. Patrick Kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H., is senior director of the Board on Global Health and the Board on African Science Academy Development at the National Academies. Kelley has overseen a portfolio of Institute of Medi- cine studies and activities on subjects as wide ranging as the evaluation of the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, the U.S. commitment

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138 RANKING VACCINES: A Prioritization Software Tool to global health, sustainable surveillance for zoonotic infections, global violence prevention, and setting priorities to build capacity for food and drug regulation in low- and middle-income countries. Prior to joining the National Academies, Kelley served on active duty in the U.S. Army for more than two decades as a public health physician–epidemiologist focusing on infectious disease surveillance and control and as a preventive medi- cine residency director and research program manager. In his last position within the U.S. Department of Defense, Kelley founded and directed the Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System. He also served as the specialty editor for the two-volume textbook Military Preven- tive Medicine: Mobilization and Deployment. Kelley received his M.D. from the University of Virginia and a Dr.P.H. in infectious disease epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Consultants Jon Andrus, M.D., is the deputy director of the Pan American Health Orga- nization (PAHO). Previously Andrus served as lead technical advisor for PAHO’s immunization program, with a focus on the poorest communities of the Americas. He was also professor and director of George Washington University’s Global Health M.P.H. Program. He also holds adjunct fac- ulty appointments at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Among other posts, he served as a medical epidemiologist at the Global Immunization Division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta and, on assignment by the CDC, as regional advisor for polio eradication and chief of vaccines and biologicals for the South-East Asia Regional Office of the World Health Organization. He has received the Emil M. Mrak International Award from the University of California, Davis; the Distinguished Service Medal—the highest award of U.S. Pub- lic Health Service—for leadership in polio eradication in Southeast Asia; and the Philip R. Horne Award for sustained worldwide leadership in the global and regional immunization initiatives to eradicate polio and elimi- nate measles and rubella and to control other vaccine-preventable diseases. Mark Feinberg, M.D., Ph.D., is vice president and chief public health and science officer for Merck Vaccines at Merck & Co., Inc. Prior to join- ing Merck, Feinberg worked for more than 20 years in both academia and government, where he was actively engaged in basic and clinical research, patient care, and health care policy with a primary focus on HIV/AIDS pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention research. Feinberg has also served

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Appendix F 139 as a member of several committees of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences, on the National Vaccine Advisory Commit- tee, and numerous other advisory boards. He is a recipient of an Elizabeth Glaser Scientist Award from the Pediatric AIDS Foundation and an Innova- tion in Clinical Research Award from the Doris Duke Charitable Founda- tion. Feinberg is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a mem- ber of the Association of American Physicians and the Council on Foreign Relations.  David Heymann, M.D., is chairman of the U.K. Health Protection Agency. He is also the head of the Centre on Global Health Security at Chatham House and a professor of infectious disease epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Previously he was the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) assistant director-general for health secu- rity and environment and the representative of the director-general for polio eradication. Earlier, he was executive director of the WHO Commu- nicable Diseases Cluster, director of the WHO Programme on Emerging and Other Communicable Diseases, and the chief of research activities in the WHO Global Programme on AIDS. Before joining WHO, Heymann worked as a medical epidemiologist in sub-Saharan Africa on assignment from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prior to that, he worked in India for 2 years as a medical epidemiologist in the WHO Smallpox Eradication Programme. Heymann has been awarded the Ameri- can Public Health Association’s Award for Excellence, the Donald Mackay Award from the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and the Heinz Award on the Human Condition. He has been appointed an hon- orary Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for his services to global public health. Heymann is an elected member of the U.K. Academy of Medical Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. Scott Levin, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Emer- gency Medicine and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He also works as a member of the Department of Oper- ations Integration to advance operational, quality, and financial improve- ment initiatives within the Johns Hopkins Health System. Levin’s research focuses on the use and development of systems engineering tools to study and improve the effectiveness, safety, and efficiency of health care delivery, including an emphasis on improving the quality of care, access to care, and medical decision making. Levin’s research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the Department

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140 RANKING VACCINES: A Prioritization Software Tool of Homeland Security. Levin received his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Vanderbilt University. Tyler Martin, M.D., served as the president, chief medical officer, and a director on the board of Dynavax Technologies. Martin has almost 20 years of drug development experience. Before joining Dynavax, Martin was president of Humabs, LLC. Previously Martin worked at Chiron as the vice president in charge of development and as the director of clinical research. In his 7 years at Chiron, Martin led the team responsible for the development of the novel vaccine adjuvant MF59, the first vaccine adjuvant licensed by regulatory agencies since alum, which was approved as part of the FLUAD influenza vaccine in Europe. He has also held senior develop- ment and research positions at Sangamo, Inc.; Valentis, Inc.; and SyStemix/ GTI. Martin received a B.S. in chemistry and an M.D. from the University of Nebraska. He completed his fellowship in pediatric infectious diseases and molecular microbiology at Washington University in St. Louis. Simon Mercer, D.Phil., is director of health and well-being at Microsoft Research Connections. He leads the creation of a global strategic portfo- lio of collaborations between Microsoft researchers and academics. Before joining Microsoft, Mercer was director of software engineering at Gene Codes Corporation, a company specializing in the sequencing and analy- sis of DNA. Prior to this, Mercer worked in a variety of jobs related to the application of computing to challenges in the life sciences, including at the UK Medical Research Council to establish the Human Chromosome Abnormality Database, a health care resource subsequently adopted by the UK National Health Service. He then moved to the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin, where he helped to create the primary data- base of the German human genome project. Mercer also led research and development initiatives at Sanger Institute in Cambridge and later became a director in the National Research Council of Canada, where he managed the Canadian Bioinformatics Resource, a pioneer in nationally distributed bioinformatics services and grid technology. Mercer holds a B.Sc. from London University and a doctorate from Oxford. He has also completed training as an ORACLE database administrator and holds several patents in the area of computational biology and health care. Paul Radspinner, M.B.A., is president and chief executive officer of FluGen, Inc., an influenza vaccine and vaccine-delivery company. After complet- ing his M.B.A. at Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management, he spent more than 15 years in management roles oversee-

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Appendix F 141 ing international pharmaceutical operations, marketing, and business development with Eli Lilly and Company. Subsequent to his time at Lilly, Radspinner managed the pharmaceuticals portfolio, including vitamin D analogs, at the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation for the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Before co-founding FluGen, Radspinner was vice president of business development for Deltanoid Pharmaceuticals, Inc. He has served as president of the board of directors for BioForward, the Wis- consin state biotechnology organization, and currently serves on the board of directors for the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation. John Spika, M.D., is director general of the Centre for Immunization and Respiratory Infectious Diseases at the Public Health Agency of Canada. He also serves as the health portfolio task force leader for pandemic (H1N1) influenza preparations and response. Spika is a specialist in pediatric infec- tious diseases and has worked in public health for more than 25 years, including time at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Health Canada/Public Health Agency of Canada, and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. He is a graduate of the CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service program. He is widely published on subjects related to immunization, host defense, and foodborne and respira- tory diseases.

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