APPENDIX

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

ARTHUR A. STONE (Chair) is distinguished professor of psychiatry and psychology, vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and director of the Applied Behavioral Medicine Research Institute, all at Stony Brook University. He is also a senior scientist at Gallup. He specializes in the field of behavioral medicine, focusing on stress, coping, physical illness, and self-report processes. He also works with Gallup researchers to explore how employee engagement relates to worker’s physical health and well-being. He has been an executive council member for the American Psychosomatic Society, a research committee member for the American Psychological Association, and a past president and executive council member of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. He holds membership to the American Psychological Society, the Society for Behavioral Medicine, and Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, among others. He has a B.A. degree from Hamilton College and a Ph.D. degree in clinical psychology from Stony Brook University.

NORMAN M. BRADBURN is the Tiffany and Margaret Blake distinguished service professor emeritus, at the University of Chicago, where he also serves on the faculties of the Department of Psychology, the Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, the Booth School of Business, and the college. He is also a senior fellow at the university’s National Opinion Research Center and serves on the board of directors of the Chapin Hall Center for Children. He previously served as assistant director for social, behavioral, and economic sciences at the National Science Foundation. His research focuses on psychological well-being and the assessment of quality of life using large-scale sample surveys. He is a past president of the American Association of Public Opinion Research. He has an M.A. degree in clinical psychology and a Ph.D. degree in social psychology, both from Harvard University.

LAURA L. CARSTENSEN is professor of psychology, the Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. professor in public policy, and the founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, all at Stanford University. Much of her work has focused on socioemotional selectivity theory—a life-span theory of motivation. Her most current empirical research focuses on ways in which motivational changes influence cognitive processing. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association, and the Gerontological Society of America, and she serves on the board of science advisors to the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, Germany. She is the recipient of the Richard Kalish award for innovative research and the distinguished career award from the Gerontological Society of America, Stanford University’s dean’s award for distinguished teaching, and a MERIT (Method to Extent Research in Time) Award from the National Institute on Aging. She has a B.S. degree in psychology from the University of Rochester, an M.A. degree in developmental psychology, and a Ph.D. degree in clinical psychology, both from West Virginia University.

EDWARD F. DIENER is the Joseph R. Smiley distinguished professor of psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a senior scientist at the Gallup Organization. His research focuses on the measurement of well-being, temperament and personality influences on well-being, theories of well-being, income and well-



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APPENDIX Biographical Sketches of Panel Members ARTHUR A. STONE (Chair) is distinguished professor of psychiatry and psychology, vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and director of the Applied Behavioral Medicine Research Institute, all at Stony Brook University. He is also a senior scientist at Gallup. He specializes in the field of behavioral medicine, focusing on stress, coping, physical illness, and self-report processes. He also works with Gallup researchers to explore how employee engagement relates to worker's physical health and well-being. He has been an executive council member for the American Psychosomatic Society, a research committee member for the American Psychological Association, and a past president and executive council member of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. He holds membership to the American Psychological Society, the Society for Behavioral Medicine, and Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, among others. He has a B.A. degree from Hamilton College and a Ph.D. degree in clinical psychology from Stony Brook University. NORMAN M. BRADBURN is the Tiffany and Margaret Blake distinguished service professor emeritus, at the University of Chicago, where he also serves on the faculties of the Department of Psychology, the Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, the Booth School of Business, and the college. He is also a senior fellow at the university's National Opinion Research Center and serves on the board of directors of the Chapin Hall Center for Children. He previously served as assistant director for social, behavioral, and economic sciences at the National Science Foundation. His research focuses on psychological well-being and the assessment of quality of life using large-scale sample surveys. He is a past president of the American Association of Public Opinion Research. He has an M.A. degree in clinical psychology and a Ph.D. degree in social psychology, both from Harvard University. LAURA L. CARSTENSEN is professor of psychology, the Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. professor in public policy, and the founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, all at Stanford University. Much of her work has focused on socioemotional selectivity theory--a life-span theory of motivation. Her most current empirical research focuses on ways in which motivational changes influence cognitive processing. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association, and the Gerontological Society of America, and she serves on the board of science advisors to the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, Germany. She is the recipient of the Richard Kalish award for innovative research and the distinguished career award from the Gerontological Society of America, Stanford University's dean's award for distinguished teaching, and a MERIT (Method to Extent Research in Time) Award from the National Institute on Aging. She has a B.S. degree in psychology from the University of Rochester, an M.A. degree in developmental psychology, and a Ph.D. degree in clinical psychology, both from West Virginia University. EDWARD F. DIENER is the Joseph R. Smiley distinguished professor of psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a senior scientist at the Gallup Organization. His research focuses on the measurement of well-being, temperament and personality influences on well-being, theories of well-being, income and well- 19

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being, and cultural influences on well-being. He has served as president of the International Society of Quality of Life Studies, the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, and the International Positive Psychology Association. Among his many awards are an honorary doctorate from the University of Berlin and a distinguished scientist award from the International Society of Quality of Life Studies. He won the distinguished researcher award from the International Society of Quality of Life Studies, the first Gallup academic leadership award, and the Jack Block award for personality psychology. He has a B.A. degree in psychology from the California State University of Fresno and a Ph.D. degree in psychology from the University of Washington. PAUL H. DOLAN is a professor of behavioral science in the Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is also chief academic adviser on economic appraisal for the Government Economic Service in the United Kingdom. Previously, he held academic posts at the universities of York, Newcastle, Sheffield, and Imperial, and he has been a visiting scholar at Princeton University. His research interests focus primarily on developing measures of subjective well-being that can be used in policy, particularly in the valuation of nonmarket goods and in extending the ways in which the lessons from behavioral economics can be used to understand and change individual behavior. He is a recipient of the Philip Leverhulme Prize in economics--awarded by the Philip Leverhulme Trust in the United Kingdom--for his contribution to health economics. He has served on many expert panels for various government departments in the United Kingdom. He has M.Sc. and D.Phil. degrees in economics from York University CAROL L. GRAHAM is College Park professor in the School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland and senior fellow in economic studies and Charles Robinson chair in foreign policy studies at the Brookings Institution. Previously, she was codirector of the Center on Social and Economic Dynamics at the Brookings Institution and research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor. She has served as special advisor to the vice president of the Inter-American Development Bank, as a visiting fellow in the office of the chief economist of the World Bank, and as a consultant to the International Monetary Fund and the Harvard Institute for International Development. Her research focuses on public health, poverty, inequality, economics of happiness, and measures of subjective well-being. She has an A.B. degree from Princeton University, an M.A. degree in international economics from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and a Ph.D. degree in political economy from Oxford University. V. JOSEPH HOTZ is the arts and sciences professor of economics in the Department of Economics at Duke University, research affiliate at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor, and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He also serves as a research affiliate at the National Poverty Center, the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, and the University of Michigan. Previously, he served as visiting scholar at the Cowles Foundation, Yale University, and at the Russell Sage Foundation and as a professor and chair of the Department of Economics at the University of California, Los Angeles. His areas of specialization include labor economics, population economics, and applied econometrics. He has a B.A. degree from the 20

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University of Notre Dame, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. DANIEL KAHNEMAN is professor of psychology and public affairs, emeritus, and senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. He is also the Eugene Higgins professor of psychology, emeritus, at Princeton University and a fellow at the Center for Rationality at The Hebrew University. Previously, he held positions as professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, associate fellow at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the Econometrical Society, and he is a fellow of the American Psychological Association. He is a recipient of the 2002 Nobel Prize in economics, as well as the distinguished scientific contribution award of the American Psychological Association, the Warren Medal of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, and the Hilgard Award for career contributions to general psychology from the American Psychological Association. He has a B.A. degree in psychology and mathematics from The Hebrew University, and a Ph.D. degree in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. ARIE KAPTEYN is a senior economist at RAND and director of its labor and population division. He also serves as associate director of the Financial Literacy Center, a joint center of RAND, Dartmouth College, and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Before joining RAND, he held several positions Tilburg University in The Netherlands, including dean of the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, founder and director of CentER, a research institute and graduate school. He has held visiting positions at Princeton University, the California Institute of Technology, Australian National University, the University of Canterbury (New Zealand), the University of Bristol, and the University of Southern California. His research expertise covers microeconomics, public finance, and econometrics. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society, a member of the Netherlands Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences, and past president of the European Society for Population Economics. He has a B.A. and an M.A. in agricultural economics from State Agricultural University Wageningen, an M.A. in econometrics from Erasmus University Rotterdam, and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Leyden University, all in The Netherlands. AMANDA SACKER is research professor in quantitative social science at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex, England. Prior to this she was principal research fellow at the University College London. She also holds numerous positions, including honorary appointment at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto; member of the executive committee of the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies; member of Health Strategy Group, University of Essex; and honorary chair in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London. Her research interests focus on life course epidemiology and inequalities in physical and mental health, with particular interest in the use of mixture models that combine categorical and continuous latent variable modeling techniques in longitudinal studies. She has a B.Sc. degree in psychology and a Ph.D. degree in psychology and statistics. 21

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NORBERT SCHWARZ is the Charles Horton Cooley collegiate professor of psychology and professor of business at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business, both at the University of Michigan. He also serves as research professor at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Previously, he taught psychology at the University of Heidelberg and served as scientific director of ZUMA, an interdisciplinary social science research center in Mannheim. His research interests focus on human judgment and cognition, including the interplay of feeling and thinking, the socially situated and embodied nature of cognition, and the implications of basic cognitive and communicative processes for public opinion, consumer behavior, and social science research. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the German National Academy of Science Leopoldina. He is a recipient of the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Prize of the German Department of Science and Education, and the Wilhelm Wundt Medal of the German Psychological Association. He has a Ph.D. degree in sociology and psychology from the University of Mannheim and a Ph.D. "Habilitation" degree in psychology from the University of Heidelberg, both in Germany. JUSTIN WOLFERS is visiting associate professor in the Department of Economics at Princeton University, associate professor of business and public policy at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, research associate at the National Bureau for Economic Research, and a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. He holds numerous other positions, including nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and senior scientist at the Gallup Organization. His research interests include law and economics, labor economics, social policy, political economy, macroeconomics, and behavioral economics. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Wharton M.B.A. core teaching award and the excellence award in global economic research from the Kiel Institute, Germany. He serves as a board member of the Prediction Markets Industry Association and on the board of advisors of Crowdcast, and he is also a regular commentator on public radio's "Marketplace." He has a B.A. degree in economics from the University of Sydney, and A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Harvard University. 22