Appendix A
Committee Biographies

J. Jerome Holton, Chair, is a senior systems engineer with the Tauri Group, where he supports the BioWatch Systems Program Office within the Office of Health Affairs, Department of Homeland Security (DHS). He provides analysis, advice, and counsel to senior government decision makers on policy, technology, and operations issues related to weapons of mass destruction and their effects on civilian infrastructure, first responders, military forces, and tactical operations. Prior to this, he served in a variety of leadership positions for private-sector companies, spanning the gamut from scientific research start-up to large management consulting firm. Past clients include the Office of the Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Counterproliferation and Chemical/Biological Defense, the Chemical Biological Defense Directorate of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the Chemical Biological National Security Program of the Department of Energy, and the DHS Science and Technology Directorate. His work extends broadly across the chemical/biological/radiological/nuclear/conventional explosives detection and countermeasures arena. For several years, he focused on the counterproliferation of, counterterrorism/domestic preparedness issues for, and the detection, identification, and decontamination of chemical and biological weapons. Recent accomplishments include fielding information operations tools and enhancing the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities to detect and defeat improvised explosive devices as well as the development of applique armor solutions to counter explosively formed penetrators. Holton previously served on the NRC’s Standing Committee on Defense Intelligence Agency Technology Forecasts and Reviews (TIGER), the Committee for the Symposium on Avoiding Technology Surprise for Tomorrow’s Warfighter, and the Committee on Alternative Technologies to Replace Antipersonnel Landmines. He earned his B.S. in physics from Mississippi State University and holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in experimental physics from Duke University.

Edward M. Greitzer (NAE), Vice Chair, is the H.N. Slater Professor, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his A.B., S.M., and Ph.D. from Harvard University. Prior to joining MIT in 1977, he was with United Technologies Corporation, and, more recently, he was on leave at United Technologies Research Center as director, Aeromechanical, Chemical, and Fluid Systems. From 1984 to 1996 he was the director of MIT’s Gas Turbine Laboratory, and from 1996 to 2002 was associate head, and from 2006 to 2008 deputy head, of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. His research interests have spanned a range of topics in gas turbines, internal flow, turbomachinery, active control of fluid systems, university-industry collaboration, and robust gas turbine engine design; he was the MIT lead for the Cambridge-MIT Institute Silent Aircraft Initiative. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in the fields of propulsion, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and energy conversion, as well as the department’s undergraduate project course. Greitzer is a three-time recipient of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Gas Turbine Award for outstanding gas turbine paper of the year; in addition, he received the ASME Freeman Scholar Award in Fluids Engineering, the International Gas Turbine Institute Scholar Award, and



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 15
Appendix A Committee Biographies J. Jerome Holton, Chair, is a senior systems engineer with the Tauri Group, where he supports the BioWatch Systems Program Office within the Office of Health Affairs, Department of Homeland Security (DHS). He provides analysis, advice, and counsel to senior government decision makers on policy, technology, and operations issues related to weapons of mass destruction and their effects on civilian infrastructure, first responders, military forces, and tactical operations. Prior to this, he served in a variety of leadership positions for private-sector companies, spanning the gamut from scientific research start-up to large management consulting firm. Past clients include the Office of the Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Counterproliferation and Chemical/Biological Defense, the Chemical Biological Defense Directorate of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the Chemical Biological National Security Program of the Department of Energy, and the DHS Science and Technology Directorate. His work extends broadly across the chemical/biological/radiological/nuclear/conventional explosives detection and countermeasures arena. For several years, he focused on the counterproliferation of, counterterrorism/domestic preparedness issues for, and the detection, identification, and decontamination of chemical and biological weapons. Recent accomplishments include fielding information operations tools and enhancing the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities to detect and defeat improvised explosive devices as well as the development of applique armor solutions to counter explosively formed penetrators. Holton previously served on the NRC’s Standing Committee on Defense Intelligence Agency Technology Forecasts and Reviews (TIGER), the Committee for the Symposium on Avoiding Technology Surprise for Tomorrow’s Warfighter, and the Committee on Alternative Technologies to Replace Antipersonnel Landmines. He earned his B.S. in physics from Mississippi State University and holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in experimental physics from Duke University. Edward M. Greitzer (NAE), Vice Chair, is the H.N. Slater Professor, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his A.B., S.M., and Ph.D. from Harvard University. Prior to joining MIT in 1977, he was with United Technologies Corporation, and, more recently, he was on leave at United Technologies Research Center as director, Aeromechanical, Chemical, and Fluid Systems. From 1984 to 1996 he was the director of MIT’s Gas Turbine Laboratory, and from 1996 to 2002 was associate head, and from 2006 to 2008 deputy head, of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. His research interests have spanned a range of topics in gas turbines, internal flow, turbomachinery, active control of fluid systems, university-industry collaboration, and robust gas turbine engine design; he was the MIT lead for the Cambridge-MIT Institute Silent Aircraft Initiative. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in the fields of propulsion, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and energy conversion, as well as the department’s undergraduate project course. Greitzer is a three-time recipient of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Gas Turbine Award for outstanding gas turbine paper of the year; in addition, he received the ASME Freeman Scholar Award in Fluids Engineering, the International Gas Turbine Institute Scholar Award, and 15

OCR for page 15
16 REPORT OF A WORKSHOP ON BIG DATA publication awards from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. He has also received the Aircraft Engine Technology Award from the ASME International Gas Turbine Institute, the U.S. Air Force Exceptional Civilian Service Award, and the ASME R. Tom Sawyer Award. He has been a member of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and the NASA Aeronautics Advisory Committee, and he is an Honorary Professor at Beihang University (Beijing). Greitzer has published more than 70 papers and is lead author of the book Internal Flow: Concepts and Applications, published by Cambridge University Press. He is a fellow of AIAA and ASME, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and an International Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering. Brian Ballard founded and currently serves as the CEO of APX Labs, a software company focused on leading development into wearable augmented reality products at the nexus of computer vision, user experience, and see-through displays. Previously he served as the director of product development and vice president at Battlefield Telecommunication Systems (BTS), where he led the development of defense-oriented augmented reality and biometric data fusion applications. As part of his portfolio, he was also heavily engaged in developing mobile 3G and 4G networks, devices, and applications for tactical military employments. Prior to joining BTS, Ballard served as the CTO at Mav6, where he was involved in the development of emerging networking and embedded systems technologies for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems and applications in government and military. He is a highly experienced professional in the field of national intelligence systems and computer engineering. Employed for more than 10 years with the National Security Agency, he has dealt with all forms of data collection, dissemination, processing, and visualization. Ballard holds an M.S. and a B.S. in electrical and computer engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and a master’s of technology management from the University of Maryland. He is currently working on an MBA at the University of Maryland. Kenneth I. Berns (NAS/IOM) is director of the University of Florida Genetics Institute and Distinguished Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Medicine. He has served as a member of the Composite Committee of the United States Medical Licensing Examination, chairman of the Association of American Medical Colleges, president of the Association of Medical School Microbiology and Immunology Chairs, president of the American Society for Virology, president of the American Society for Microbiology, and vice-president of the International Union of Microbiological Societies. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. Berns’s research examines the molecular basis of replication of the human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus, and the ability of an adeno- associated virus to establish latent infections and be reactivated. His work has helped provide the basis for use of this virus as a vector for gene therapy. Berns’s M.D. and his Ph.D. in biochemistry are from the Johns Hopkins University. Ann N. Campbell is director, Information Solutions and Services, at Sandia National Laboratories. Her organization develops and stewards a broad range of software applications and information systems for both internal (enterprise) and external customers to facilitate the delivery of effective national security technologies. At Sandia, she previously served as senior manager and deputy to the chief technology officer for cybersecurity science and technology (S&T). In that role she was responsible for developing and implementing an institutional strategy for cyber S&T. She was recently acting director for Sandia’s Cyber Security Strategic Thrust, leading the lab’s activities to expand Sandia’s cyber workforce and infrastructure, and strategies to provide increased support for Sandia’s national security sponsors’ cyber missions. Campbell has also served as deputy for technical programs for the Defense Systems and Assessments Strategic Management Unit (DSA SMU). In that role she advised the DSA vice president regarding the

OCR for page 15
APPENDIX A 17 unit’s national security programs, was responsible for strategic planning and the investment strategy for the DSA, and assisted with implementation of the laboratory’s cyber strategy. From 2003 to 2007, Campbell led the Assessment Technologies Group in Sandia’s Information Systems Analysis Center. She was responsible for development, coordination, and oversight of programs focusing on vulnerability assessments and development of national security solutions in information technologies for multiple government sponsors. From 1999 to 2003 she was manager of the Microsystems Partnerships Department, which assessed and addressed microelectronics vulnerabilities for a variety of government sponsors. In that role Campbell led Sandia’s program to support the DoD Anti-Tamper Initiative. She joined the technical staff at Sandia in 1985 and had assignments in the Materials and Process Center and the Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components Center. She conducted research on the microstructure and physical properties of advanced materials, the physics of microelectronics failures, and the development of advanced microelectronics failure analysis techniques. Campbell serves on the National Academies’ Standing Committee on Technology Insight–Gauge, Evaluate and Review (TIGER). She is a senior member of IEEE and served as vice president of membership for the IEEE Reliability Society and on the Management Committee and board of directors for the IEEE International Reliability Physics Symposium. She has more than 20 publications and several patents. She holds a B.S. degree in materials engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied physics (materials science concentration) from Harvard University. Dean R. Collins recently retired as a deputy director of DARPA’s Microsystems Technology Office (MTO); as a chief scientist he was responsible for the monitoring, analysis, and evaluation of research projects directed by MTO program managers and also participated in the concept planning for leading MTO into new programs beyond the current state of the art in electronics, photonics, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), component architectures, and algorithms. He managed the MTO program on integrated circuit cybersecurity. Prior to joining DARPA, Collins was director for the Advanced Research and Development Activity (ARDA) in information technology. ARDA functioned as a joint activity of the intelligence community and the Department of Defense, addressing high-risk/high-payoff information technology problems that had broad impact across both supporting communities. Collins initiated ARDA’s key cyber security effort. He was also a member of the intelligence community Advanced Research and Development Committee and managed the ARDA quantum information science effort. Prior to joining ARDA, Collins was with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where he was chief of the High Performance Systems and Services Division, the largest division at NIST. This position focused on information technology with a strong commercial bias, and the topics investigated ranged from biometrics to electronic books. Previously, Collins was with Texas Instruments, as director of the System Components Lab, which was responsible for all research on III-V devices, nanoelectronics, photonics, and neural networks. Prior to that, he was director of the Interface Technology Lab, which was responsible for all sensor and display research, including LCDs, DLPs, and CCDs. Collins is a fellow of the IEEE, a member of the American Physical Society, and a registered professional engineer. He has published more than 40 refereed articles and has 10 issued U.S. patents. Sharon C. Glotzer is the Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering and a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Michigan (UM), Ann Arbor, and is director of research computing in the UM College of Engineering. She also holds faculty appointments in physics, applied physics, and macromolecular science and engineering. She received a B.S. in physics from UCLA and a Ph.D. in physics from Boston University. Prior to joining UM, she worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Her research focuses on computational nanoscience and simulation of soft matter, self-assembly and materials design, and computational science and engineering and is sponsored by the DoD, DoE, NSF, and

OCR for page 15
18 REPORT OF A WORKSHOP ON BIG DATA the J.S. McDonnell Foundation. Glotzer is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the National Security Science and Engineering Faculty, and she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011. She has served on the National Academies’ Solid State Sciences Committee; Technology Warning and Surprise study committee; Biomolecular Materials and Processes study committee; Modeling, Simulation, and Games study committee; and Technology Insight–Gauge, Evaluate, and Review (TIGER) Committee. She is involved in roadmapping activities for computational science and engineering, including chairing or co- chairing several workshops, steering committees and pan-agency initiatives, and she serves on the advisory committees for the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing and NSF Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences. Glotzer is also co-founding director of the Virtual School for Computational Science and Engineering under the auspices of the NSF-funded Blue Waters Petascale Computing Project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. J.C. Herz is chief executive officer at Batchtags, LLC. She is also a technologist with a background in biological systems and computer game design. Her specialty is massively multiplayer systems that leverage social network effects, whether on the web, mobile devices, or more exotic high-end or grubby low-end hardware. She currently serves as a White House Special Consultant to the Office of the Secretary of Defense (Networks and Information Integration). Defense projects range from aerospace systems to a computer-game-derived interface for next-generation unmanned air systems. Hertz is one of the three co-authors of OSD’s Open Technology Development roadmap. She serves on the Federal Advisory Committee for the National Science Foundation’s education directorate. In that capacity, she is helping NSF harness emerging technologies to drive U.S. competitiveness in math and science. Hertz was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on IT and Creative Practice and is currently a fellow of Columbia University’s American Assembly, where she is on the leadership team of the Assembly’s Next Generation Project. In 2002, she was designated a Global Leader for Tomorrow by the World Economic Forum. She is a member of the Global Business Network; a founding member of the IEEE Task Force on Game Technologies; a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations; and a member of the advisory board of Carnegie Mellon’s ETC Press. Hertz graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in biology and environmental studies, magna cum laude. She is the author of two books, Surfing on the Internet (Little Brown, 1994), an ethnography of cyberspace before the web, and Joystick Nation: How Videogames Ate Our Quarters, Won Our Hearts, and Rewired Our Minds (Little Brown, 1997), a history of videogames which traces the cultural and technological evolution of the first medium that was born digital and how it shaped the minds of a generation weaned on Nintendo. Her books have been translated into seven languages. As a New York Times columnist, Hertz published 100 essays on the grammar and syntax of game design between 1998 and 2000. She has also contributed to Esther Dyson’s Release 1.0, Rolling Stone, Wired, GQ, and the Calgary Philatelist. Kenneth A. Kress is a senior scientist for KBK Consulting, Inc., an affilate of Montana State University’s Department of Physics, and a consultant for Booz Allen Hamilton, where he specializes in quantum information science and other technical evaluations and strategic planning for intelligence and defense applications. Some of his past clients include DARPA’s Microsytems Technology Office, Noblis, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Mitretek Systems Inc., and Lockheed Martin’s Special Programs Division. From 1971 to 1999 he worked in a series of positions at the Central Intelligence Agency’s Directorate of Operations, Office of Development and Engineering, and finally, Office of Research and Development (ORD); first as a research and development manager, later as a program manager, and finally as an ORD Office senior scientist responsible for management support, the development of technical and strategic plans, and DOD inter-agency coordination for advanced technology. He is the inventor of the solid-state neutron

OCR for page 15
APPENDIX A 19 detector, for which he won an award in 1981. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Montana State University. Darrell D.E. Long is the Kumar Malavalli Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He holds the Kumar Malavalli Endowed Chair of Storage Systems Research and is director of the Storage Systems Research Center. He received his B.S. in computer science from San Diego State University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego. His dissertation advisor was Jehan-François Pâris. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society, the Association for Computing Machinery, the American Society for Engineering Education, the Usenix Association, Upsilon Pi Epsilon, and Sigma Xi. He has broad research interests in many areas of mathematics and science, and in the area of computer science including data storage systems, operating systems, distributed computing, reliability and fault tolerance, and computer security. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation; the Department of Energy (Office of Science and National Nuclear Security Administration); Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia National Laboratories; the Office of Naval Research; and a number of industrial sponsors that include IBM, Microsoft, NetApp, Symantec, LSI Logic, Samsung, Hewlett-Packard, and Data Domain. He served as the vice chair and then chair of the University of California Committee on Research Policy. He has served on the University of California President’s Council on the National Laboratories, and on the Science and Technology, National Security, and Intelligence committees. He currently serves on the Science and Technology committee for both Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. He previously served on the National Research Council Standing Committee for Technology Insight–Gauge, Evaluate and Review. He continues to serve on numerous committees and advisory panels for various federal government agencies. Julie J.C.H. Ryan is an associate professor and chair of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering at George Washington University. She holds a B.S. degree in humanities from the U.S. Air Force Academy, an M.L.S. in technology from Eastern Michigan University, and a D.Sc. in engineering management from the George Washington University. Ryan began her career as an intelligence officer, serving the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency. After leaving government service, she continued to serve U.S. national security interests through positions in industry. Her areas of interest are in information security and information warfare research. She was a member of the National Research Council’s Naval Studies Board from 1995 to 1998. She has conducted several research projects and has written several articles and book chapters in her focus area. Janet A. Therianos, a consultant, has 30 years of military experience. She is a U.S. Air Force Academy graduate with an undergraduate degree in aeronautical engineering; an MBA from Harvard Business School; and a masters of arts in air and space power strategy. She was a National Defense fellow and has executive education from Harvard’s Kennedy School of government, the Center for Creative Leadership, and the Intelligence Community Senior Leader Program. Therianos has flown several military aircraft and has served as a command pilot, flight examiner, flight instructor, and functional check pilot. She also holds an FAA Airline Transport Pilot rating. Her military career was grounded in operations, but she also had extensive higher- headquarters staff duties, including serving as senior military assistant to the Secretary of the Air Force. Her leadership experiences were threaded throughout her career, including several Commands. Her final military assignment was leading the Air Mobility Command’s Directorate of Intelligence, where she was responsible for organizing, training, and equipping the Air Force’s

OCR for page 15
20 REPORT OF A WORKSHOP ON BIG DATA global mobility intelligence units. Operationally she led the Command’s daily Threat Working Group, which assessed threat levels for all global mobility flight operations. Elias Towe is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering and the Albert and Ethel Grobstein Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He was educated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he received B.S, M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Towe was a Vinton Hayes Fellow at MIT. After leaving MIT he became a professor of electrical and computer engineering, and engineering physics at the University of Virginia. He also served as a program manager in the Microsystems Technology Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) while he was a professor at the University of Virginia. In 2001, he joined the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University. Towe is a recipient of several awards and honors that include the National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award, the Young Faculty Teaching Award, and an Outstanding Achievement Award from the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Optical Society of America (OSA), the American Physical Society (APS), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Alfonso Velosa III is research director for Gartner with a focus on sustainability, business ecosystems, and smart cities. He is also agenda manager for electronic equipment research at Gartner, concentrating on electronics and semiconductor supply chain research, with a particular focus on global trends for manufacturing, consumption, financing, and the key vendors in the market. Velosa has also written extensively about electronics, outsourcing of electronics manufacturing, electronic manufacturing services (EMS), original design manufacturing (ODM), and semiconductor consumption. He previously worked at or consulted for Intel Corporation, NASA Lewis Research Center and NASA Headquarters, Mars & Co., and IBM Research. Velosa graduated from Columbia University with a B.S. in materials science engineering; from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with an M.S. in materials science engineering; and from Thunderbird, the Garvin School of International Management, with an M.I.M. in international management. Eli Yablonovitch (NAS/NAE) is an adjunct professor of electrical engineering at UCLA after having served as a full faculty member until 2007. He is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering at University of California, Berkeley. He graduated with a Ph.D. in applied physics from Harvard University, worked for 2 years at Bell Telephone Laboratories, and then became a professor of applied physics at Harvard. In 1979 he joined Exxon to do research on photovoltaic solar energy; in 1984, joined Bell Communications Research, where he was a Distinguished Member of Staff and also director of Solid-State Physics Research; and in 1992, joined the University of California, Los Angeles, where he became the Northrop Grumman Opto- Electronics Chair and a professor of electrical engineering. Yablonovitch’s work has covered a broad variety of topics: nonlinear optics, laser-plasma interaction, infrared laser chemistry, photovoltaic energy conversion, strained-quantum-well lasers, and chemical modification of semiconductor surfaces. Yablonovitch’s research focuses on optoelectronics, high-speed optical communications, high-efficiency light-emitting diodes and nanocavity lasers, photonic crystals at optical and microwave frequencies, and quantum computing and communication.