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182 Wayfinding and Signing Guidelines for Airport Terminals and Landside ware or software is at its end of life. Then, consideration should be given to the replacement of these elements. If this may be the case, then system equipment should be installed that support "open" system architecture standards and protocols to allow the use of several different manufacturers' systems and devices that do support an "open" system architecture to provide interoperability, compati- bility and interchangeability within the wayfinding and signing system. 7.1.5 Integration with Static Signs Dynamic signs should be used where they are clearly necessary to accommodate a changing state of operations and to provide convenient and timely information to the passengers and patrons. The specific type of dynamic signing device utilized should be one determined most appropriate for the specific application in question. In general, dynamic message signage manufacturers have a library of MUTCD pictographs for easy insertion into a canned or custom message that can easily be produced in a matter of minutes via drag-and-drop functions in the software provided by the sign manufacturer. In all cases, the dynamic signing equipment for exterior applications should be capable of remote operation and be fully weather proof. Wherever used, dynamic signage fonts, colors, and pictographs should fol- low the "standards" adopted by the wayfinding and airport Sign Manager. 7.2 Systems and Visual Displays 7.2.1 MUFIDS and BIDS The Multiple User Flight Information Display System (MUFIDS) provides display of flight information to passengers and patrons by destination city, airline, arrival and departure times, gates, and status of the flight (on-time, delayed, cancelled, or landed). Baggage Information Dis- plays (BIDS), a component of MUFIDS, provides display of baggage claim carousel or baggage belt information. FIDS/BIDS may include displays displaying information to the ramp person- nel, on ticket and gate counter back walls, above the jet bridge doors, in various back offices, and above the ticket counter displays (first class/premier check-in, bag check, etc.). FIDS/BIDS may be integrated with the airlines ticketing and boarding pass system [com- monly called CUTE (Common User Terminal Equipment) or MUSE (Multiple User System Equipment)--acronyms developed by the manufacturers], Common Use Self Service (CUSS) system, visual paging, and video advertising. 7.2.2 Concourse-Specific vs. Airport-Wide MUFIDS Displays Banks of MUFIDS displays that only convey information about flights within a specific con- course can be useful, but such displays are limited with regard to overall customer service. Such displays may be useful for airlines which have many flights concentrated within a specific con- course, but for the vast majority of carriers there is little to be gained from concourse-specific MUFIDS displays. Display banks showing all flights within the airport (e.g., Airport-wide displays) are the most beneficial for the traveling public since they show all flights from all carriers. These types of display banks provide necessary information for the passengers who are changing planes, switching carri- ers, trying to determine an alternate route to their final destination, as well as being beneficial to the meeters and greeters. It can also assist passengers and meeters/greeters in determining that they

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Technology 183 may be in the wrong concourse for a given flight. Unfortunately, the airport-wide display banks may also be the most costly to implement, due to the number of displays required to show all flights. It is recommended that such airport-wide display banks be located at strategic points through- out the airport (e.g., Main Terminal and all Concourses). As a minimum, it is recommended that such display banks be located at key strategic terminal locations. Specific locations should be deter- mined during the MUFIDS design phase. The following are examples: After ticketing but just prior to entering the security checkpoint. Near the entrance to the Automatic People Mover (APM) or Shuttle stations in the main ter- minal, to allow the passenger to confirm that he is boarding the correct APM or Shuttle to his destination concourse. At the exit of APM or Shuttle stations inside the entrance to each concourse. This allows the pas- senger to determine if they should go left or right into the concourse for their flight. Within the baggage claim area, multiple locations showing primarily arriving flights. This would assist passengers in finding the correct baggage carousel or baggage belt for their baggage, as well as assisting the meeters and greeters. Areas far removed from the key decision points. Arriving passengers may deplane at the far end of a concourse. Consequently, an argument can be made that MUFIDS displays are warranted at intermittent points throughout the concourses in order that arriving passengers can obtain information relative to their movements. The arriving passenger should not have to reverse their path of travel to go to a new transfer gate because the information is not readily available. 7.2.3 Key Decision Points The airport Sign Manager must be involved in the following to determine key decision points for the placement of wayfinding signage. These include the following: Placement, Content and legibility, and ADA considerations. MUFIDS displays are installed at various locations throughout the terminal to provide flight information to the passengers and patrons of the facility. Selection of locations for the displays must coincide with the pathway of the passengers. The selected locations must be readily available for viewing, but not a deterrent to traffic flow. Locations that would be considered "key" or "strategic" in terms of the passenger being required to make a decision include the following: Prior to Ticketing At various pedestrian exits in the parking garages (e.g., inside the APM or Shuttle station), pedestrian exit ways to bus stops for rides to the terminal, exits to walkways to the termi- nal, particularly, if there are "Y" turns along the pathway to the destination where along the way, a pedestrian must choose which area of the terminal he wants as his final destination (e.g., east end or west end) and in the cell phone waiting parking lots. Before ticketing In front of the ticket counters to allow passengers to know the status of the flight. Displays are typically spaced at approximately 250 foot intervals. After Ticketing Just prior to entering the security checkpoint. After passing through the security checkpoint. Near the entrance to the APM or Shuttle stations in the main terminal--allows the passengers to confirm that they are boarding the correct train to their destination concourse.

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184 Wayfinding and Signing Guidelines for Airport Terminals and Landside Gates/Concourses At the exit from the APM or Shuttle stations located inside the entrance to each concourse which allows the passenger to determine if he should go left or right into the concourse for his flight. In the concourses spaced at approximately 250 foot intervals. Due to the physical layouts of some concourses, arriving passengers may deplane at the far end of a concourse--a signifi- cant distance from those strategic points identified herein. Consequently, an argument can be made that MUFIDS displays are warranted at intermittent points throughout the con- courses in order for arriving passengers to obtain information relative to their movements. It makes little sense to locate a display bank at the very end of a concourse due to the limited passenger traffic that would utilize it. Put the MUFIDS displays where people congregate (e.g., food courts, near restrooms, close to directory maps). In the various Airline Club Rooms (usually Airline specific only). Baggage Claim Within the baggage claim area--multiple locations of MUFIDS displaying arriving flights and BIDS to assist the passengers in finding the correct baggage carousel or baggage belt for retrieval of their baggage. Other Locations In the meeters and greeters hall--provide meeters and greeters with passenger arrivals information. In baggage tunnel areas, operations office, and back office areas--allow support personnel to know specific airline gate and flight status information. To comply with ADA requirements and/or local ADA guidelines, the MUFIDS would typically display Visual Paging messages on designated monitors, as well as providing MUFIDS data and other selected data in an ADA-compliant format. If Visual Paging is already implemented through the Audio/Visual Paging system, then the MUFIDS should be interfaced to or integrated with that system. See Section 7.28. 7.2.4 Content and Display Goals Content is the message to be displayed at and applicable to any given location. The information must be clear, concise, and legible. Things for content consideration, over and above the standards for fonts, font size, and colors include the following: Available space on the display, Potential conflicts with tenants, Multi-national languages, Optimization of visibility, Distance from the viewer, Avoidance of congestion, and Maintenance access. 7.2.5 Display Mounting Options There are a number of factors involved in whether displays will be mounted vertically or hori- zontally. These include the type and arrangement of data to be displayed (e.g., airport-wide versus concourse-specific), arrival/departure times, readability distances, font size, and available display width (both vertically and horizontally). The displays come in a variety of sizes and can be mounted either vertically or horizontally. Upon determining what information will be displayed, the mounting orientation becomes self-fulfilling.

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Technology 185 That is, in a vertical orientation, if the data fields (columns) can be fit within the vertical limits of the display, more lines (rows) of information can be fitted on the display. Conversely, if the data fields (columns) cannot fit within the vertical limits of the display, then the display must be mounted in a horizontal orientation. This occurrence requires more displays, since fewer rows can be displayed. Ultimately, MUFIDS installations should be designed to complement the terminal architecture. Good or bad, this leads to an infinite number of interpretations and potential solutions for mount- ing these displays. To the extent practical, all MUFIDS display installations should be designed to allow for changes in display sizes and technology evolutions. Universal simple post and rail system display mounts should be considered because, as displays are moved either horizontally or verti- cally, the new installations will require only a simple unbolting and re-bolting. This basic support structure should be standardized throughout the airport to provide a common appearance, while still allowing the basic structure to be customized to more closely match the specific architectural characteristics of each location. Whether text is displayed vertically or horizontally, in a single row configuration, the text reads left to right. In multiple row configurations, the text reads up/down in each column, then to next column to the right. 7.2.6 Readability of Text for FIDS ANSI/HFS 100-1988, Paragraph 6.14.261 provides a formula to calculate text height for read- ability. Using the formula, the text height for readability at a distance of 20 (240) would need to be 1.1 inches high, say 1 high. 7.2.7 Departure vs. Arrivals MUFIDS Information Figures 7.1 and 7.2 illustrate typical information to be displayed at the departures and arrivals locations. The destination/origin cities and remarks could be shown in multi-national text. The multi-national text would be toggled sequentially among several different languages. Multi- national language applications may not be applicable to all airports. Recommended order of information displayed by column is origin/departure city; airline; flight number; code share airline (airline and code share airline may be displayed as a fade-in/fade out configuration); flight number; gate number; time of arrival/departure; and status remarks (on-time, delayed, landed, cancelled, etc.). Time window for display of information--The desired time window is one of the most criti- cal factors in determining the number of displays required in a MUFIDS display bank. This fac- tor is driven by how long prior to/after departure and arrival information should be shown on the MUFIDS. Typically, the following time window goals for information displays have been identified: Domestic departures--3 hours prior to + 0.5 hours after departure. International departures--4 hours prior to + 1 hour after departure. Domestic arrivals--2 hours prior to + 1 hour after arrival. International arrivals--3 hours prior to + 2 hours after arrival. Information displayed will include city (departing to or arriving from--if international, may include multi-lingual descriptor); the carrier and flight number (carrier may be airline logo, air- line name, and/or combination of both); code share carrier and flight number; gate number; time; and remarks (remarks include flight status such as on-time, landed, and cancelled); and may be multi-national text.

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186 Wayfinding and Signing Guidelines for Airport Terminals and Landside Figure 7.1. Sample departures display--Dulles International Airport (IAD). Ideally, each MUFIDS display will convey flight information for all types of operations (e.g., international departures, international arrivals, domestic departures, and domestic arrivals). However, space constraints may limit the amount of information displayed. In those areas where space is limited, consideration may be given to varying the type of information presented at each MUFIDS display bank. For example, international arrivals information may not need to be dis- played at concourses dedicated to domestic arrivals only. 7.2.8 Visual Paging The MUFIDS may support visual paging capabilities. Such visual pages can be entered man- ually from designated MUFIDS workstations, such as those located at the Travelers Aid desks. Depending upon system configuration, such pages can temporarily occupy a complete or par- tial area on a designated MUFIDS display in selected display group locations, can appear as a scrolling marquee at the bottom of one or more displays, or be displayed on a separate stand- alone display.

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Technology 187 Figure 7.2. Sample arrivals display--IAD. Figure 7.3 shows an example of a stand-alone visual paging display currently installed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO). Figure 7.4 shows an example of a Paging Assistance Loca- tion (PAL) to retrieve a message at the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX). Although Visual Paging functionality is typically provided in the MUFIDS software, this func- tionality may be unused, since the visual paging function may be supported by dedicated dis- plays provided as part of the public address system. One of the strengths of the public address system is that visual and audio pages can be synchronized. This is a feature that cannot be easily accomplished if the MUFIDS were used for visual paging. However, the use of MUFIDS displays for visual paging does offer certain advantages includ- ing the following: MUFIDS displays provide all necessary infrastructures to support visual paging functions for little additional costs. Passengers with hearing disabilities normally have their attention drawn to such displays as part of the normal wayfinding through the airport.

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188 Wayfinding and Signing Guidelines for Airport Terminals and Landside Figure 7.3. Sample visual paging display--SFO. Figure 7.4. Sample paging assistance location--PHX.

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Technology 189 When not in use for visual paging, designated visual paging displays could display alternate information such as additional flight information, way-finding information, and advertising. If interest in accomplishing visual paging is through MUFIDS implementations, decisions are needed as to whether this will be accomplished on dedicated displays. This could potentially impact the total number of displays required at each location. 7.2.9 Integration with MUFIDS So that the various systems (e.g., CUTE/MUSE, Paging, or CUSS) will "talk" to each other, establish software requirements for an API (Application Programmer Interface) such that exter- nal modules can be integrated into the MUFIDS to meet specific requirements and needs of the integration and the Airport. 7.2.10 Ticketing Area Displays In an airport, there are two types of ticket counters identified: dedicated airline ticket counters (e.g., those utilized by only one airline) and common-use ticket counters (e.g., those positions equipped with CUTE/MUSE terminals that can be utilized by any airline). The following section provides recommendations for MUFIDS displays at these two types of ticket counters and includes information for backwall displays, over-the-counter displays, and common-use self ser- vice check-in. 7.2.11 Dedicated Ticket Counter Positions An airline typically wants to be able to provide passengers with information about its flights right at the airline ticket counter. Some airlines at the airport have this currently (e.g., FIDS displays on the backwall of the ticket counter), although there appears to be no consistency or standards about where and how this information is shown. Depending on the amount of flight traffic, this may require multiple displays for arrivals and departures, or might be a single monitor that shows both arrivals and departures for that airline. These monitors are typically located on the backwall behind the ticket counter locations. Above selected ticket counters, there may be two-line LED signs or flat panel displays that are used to direct the passenger to the correct ticket counter line; (e.g., First Class Only, Elite Mem- bers, "Ticket Purchase," "Check-in," etc.) These signs should be under the control of MUFIDS, although the individual ticket agent would have the ability to change the contents of these displays based on the current need. 7.2.12 Common-Use Ticket Counter Positions Common-use ticket counter positions are becoming more prevalent. Such positions should have MUFIDS display needs similar to that of the dedicated positions, with the following exceptions: At common-use ticket counter positions, MUFIDS should support backwall displays for air- line logos and airline-specific flight information. Because positions are to be common-use, there exists a need to associate a given position with a given airline. It is recommended that this be accomplished via a dedicated display in the backwall that can dynamically display the corresponding airline logo. To support those airlines that may desire their flight information to be displayed at a ticket counter, a second display should be provided in support of such information. Depending on the amount of flight traffic, this may require multiple displays for arrivals and departures, or might be a single monitor that shows both arrivals and departures for that airline.

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190 Wayfinding and Signing Guidelines for Airport Terminals and Landside At common-use ticket counter positions, MUFIDS should support LED signs or flat panel dis- plays above the ticket counter position. Given that there will be a CUTE/MUSE terminal at such locations, controls for the backwall dis- plays and the over-the-counter displays can be done via a MUFIDS session on the CUTE/MUSE terminal. 7.2.13 Common-Use Self Service (CUSS) Kiosks For passengers with no baggage to check-in, CUSS kiosks may be located at the entrances to the Terminal or at the pedestrian exits of the parking garages. These are intended to provide a board- ing pass so that passengers can proceed directly to passenger screening. For passengers checking baggage, the CUSS kiosks are located in front of the airlines ticket counter. The passengers access the CUSS terminal using a credit card, which brings up a display identifying the passenger, confirms the destination city, asks how many bags are being checked, asks whether a seat change is desired, and issues the boarding pass. The passenger then waits to be called by the airlines representative to come forward to check in the bags. 7.2.14 Departure Area Displays Although not a fully comprehensive list, various types of displays and locations for these dis- plays in Gate Holdroom Areas are described in the following sections. 7.2.15 Standards for Gate Podium Displays It is understood that an Airport desires the development of standardized design criteria for the various types of gate podiums. These standards will be applied to all future gate podium installations and may be applied to existing podiums subject to budgetary constraints. While such standards can only be fully developed as part of a design effort, this guideline identifies basic recommendations that can serve as the basis for future design efforts. As a general recommendation, consideration should be given to the use of flat panel backwall displays to convey information relevant to the next flight departing the gate. While such displays would be under the control of MUFIDS, local manual control would be supported via CUTE/MUSE workstations within the limits of the airline representative's authorization. MUFID software should be capable of dynamically changing the displays at gates in support of various types of operations based upon schedules and operator actions (e.g., the gate podium designated as Multi-Use International can easily be changed via the MUFIDS software to be a Dedicated Domestic gate). 7.2.16 Multi-Use Commuter Gates Multi-use commuter gates serve commuter flights where the commuter flights are potentially for different commuter carriers. Due to the nature of commuter operations, there may be a need to display a large number of flights associated with a given airline/gate. In addition, displays should accommodate code share information. Consequently, consideration should be given to larger or multiple displays to convey the necessary flight information. At multi-use commuter gates, the gate backwall should have a display device to display the sta- tus of the flights associated with the gate. For commuter airlines, this may require a large number of flights to be displayed. Because this gate is to be designated for multiple-use, consideration

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Technology 191 should be given to installing a separate display for the purpose of displaying the airline logo for the commuter airline currently at the gate. Due to the potentially significant amount of information to be conveyed by the backwall dis- plays (e.g., numerous flights), it may prove beneficial to also provide a separate LED sign to con- vey current activities (e.g., A NOW BOARDING FLIGHT . . .@). Due to the information which needs to be shown regarding flights leaving at approximately the same time, the LED sign may show only a line of information per flight, instead of using the entire LED to show detailed infor- mation about a single flight. Although the details of the requirements for the LED signs at these gates would be further defined in the design phase, our analysis is that the LED signs may need to be larger than the LED signs typically used so that additional lines of information can be dis- played simultaneously. As opposed to providing a separate display for airline logo images, optional consideration should be given to screen designs which feature airline logos in the background with flight information superimposed over the top. 7.2.17 Dedicated Commuter Gates Dedicated commuter gates serve commuter flights from the same commuter carrier. MUFIDS requirements for such gate podiums are identical to that of the multi-use commuter gate podiums with the exception that there is no need for a display for airline logos. At dedicated commuter gates, the gate backwall should have a display device to display the sta- tus of the flights associated with the gate. For commuter airlines, this may require a large number of flights to be displayed. At dedicated commuter gates, the video controllers in the display banks and gate podium back- walls should be capable of full-motion video (e.g., to display video advertising), although it may not be utilized at initial implementation. At dedicated commuter gates, a separate LED sign should be provided to convey information about current and near-term flight activities. 7.2.18 Multi-Use Domestic Gates Multi-use domestic gates serve regular domestic flights from multiple carriers. As compared to commuter airline gates, backwall displays should be required to only display modest flight infor- mation. However, consideration should be given for the display of code sharing and multiple des- tination flights. Because this gate is designated as multiple-use, consideration should also be given to installing a separate display for the purpose of displaying the airline logos for the airline currently served by the gate. As opposed to providing a separate display for airline logo images, optional consideration should be given to screen designs which feature airline logos in the background with flight information superimposed over the top. 7.2.19 Dedicated Domestic Gates Dedicated domestic gates serve regular domestic flights from the same carrier. MUFIDS require- ments for such gate podiums are identical to that of the multi-use domestic gate podiums with the exception that there is no need for a separate display for airline logos.

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192 Wayfinding and Signing Guidelines for Airport Terminals and Landside At dedicated domestic gates, the gate backwall should have a display device to display the sta- tus of the flights associated with the gate. 7.2.20 Multi-Use International Gates Multi-use international gates serve regular international flights from multiple carriers. MUFID requirements for such gates should be similar to that of multi-use domestic gate podiums with the exception that the flight displays should be designed to support foreign languages in addition to English. Such foreign language requirements create a strong argument for flat-screen displays, as opposed to LEDs, due to the need for higher resolution graphics required to support foreign language characters. As opposed to providing a separate display for airline logo images, consideration should be given to screen designs which feature airline logos in the background with flight information super- imposed over the top. 7.2.21 Dedicated International Gates Dedicated international gates serve regular international flights from the same carrier. MUFIDS requirements for such gate podiums are identical to that of the multi-use international gate podiums with the exception that there is no need for a separate display for airline logos. 7.2.22 Jet Bridge Door Signage Jet bridge door signage is a small electronic device, typically a two-line LED sign or flat panel dis- play, which indicates the flight number and the destination city. This sign is located in the hold room area just above the jet bridge door. This type of sign provides passengers with a final glance at information about the flight that they are about to board, to ensure that they are boarding the correct flight. 7.2.23 BIDS (Baggage Information Display System) Figure 7.5 shows what could be a typical display in the Baggage Claim area. Note, the baggage carousel or baggage belt number will typically be shown on all "Arrivals" displays. BIDS displays should be located within the baggage claim area and the meeters/greeters hall. A small bank of such displays should be located at each primary entrance to the baggage claim area, and these displays should show flights that have recently arrived or will be arriving in the near future. These should serve as baggage claim directories, and should show the airline(s); flight num- ber(s); origin city name(s); time of arrival, flight status (e.g., on-time, landed, delayed, cancelled); and the baggage carousel or baggage belt number being used for the flight. Other baggage claim display types may be located at each carousel and/or baggage belts to confirm the airline, flight number, and/or city being unloaded on the carousel or baggage belt. These same displays may be used for video advertising and/or may show local interest information (places to visit, airport construction progress, and other similar items) when not actually in use. Additionally, a "last bag" indication may be displayed to show that all baggage has been unloaded. 7.2.24 BIDS Location BIDS are located inside the baggage claim area near the primary passenger entrances and, dependent upon the size of the baggage claim area, may be located at 250-foot intervals along the front of the carousels and/or baggage belts. Additional displays may be desired in the baggage claim

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Technology 193 Figure 7.5. Sample baggage information display. to show directions to and location of airline baggage offices and the location for over-sized baggage pick-up. 7.2.25 Dynamic Directories In lieu of static "you are here" map directories, consideration should be given to the use of dynamic map directories. This is because displays are now available in large size screen formats with high definition resolution. These types of displays can contain a significant amount of wayfinding information. The rationale for using this type of display is that all changes in the archi- tectural layout of an airport can be easily modified on the display by downloading the graphical layouts from a central location without the need to replace a static directory each time a change to the facility is made. Options for digital applications for directories continue to evolve. Digital directory applications can be separated into two basic categories: passive and interactive. Passive digital directories dis- play a static image using a flat screen monitor. Interactive directories allow users to search for infor- mation using touch screen panels. While there is no established best practices, the following is a list

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194 Wayfinding and Signing Guidelines for Airport Terminals and Landside of five considerations airports should address when considering integration of interactive wayfind- ing into their overall directional wayfinding schema. Map-driven vs. intent-driven organization of wayfinding content. One of the biggest oppor- tunities in the market is to orient the content towards the viewers' specific needs. For instance, pres- ent all Points of Interest (POI) available in an airport concourse property, such as emergency, medical, or administration vs. POI for specific passenger needs such as Quick Serve Restaurants (QSR) and other Retail concessionaires. It may be a better use of resources to reserve Interactive Wayfinding for more heavily searched POI such as concessionaires. The efficiency of a singular user experience vs. a multi-user experience. Airport patrons have become accustomed to interactive experiences delivered via kiosk, be it check-in or rental car, while they have traditionally digested directional and wayfinding information in a much less inti- mate manner through static signs and large, printed public display maps. Questions to answer: If a large format screen is programmed to provide wayfinding information, will people use it? Does its size leave people feeling exposed, knowing that others may "eavesdrop" as to what they are look- ing for? Is wayfinding more aptly handled in the manner of current interactions via kiosk? If so, how do you encourage the general public to interact with them? Management of interactive wayfinding systems. Printed wayfinding signs have traditionally proven to be costly and have very limited life cycles. And while digital signage and Interactive Wayfinding are significant steps in alleviating some of those costs, administrators should realize and appropriate resources for continued management of these systems. Manufacturers, resellers, or agencies that provide design and content management services should be favored when weigh- ing these considerations. Systems that also offer the simplicity and flexibility of being managed by Airport Staff should also be given weighted consideration. Using an interactive wayfinding system as a value-add or revenue generating mechanism. Investment in interactive wayfinding is not an inconsequential expenditure. How do Airport Administrators maximize that investment and shorten the ROI realization term? Diligent interac- tive wayfinding systems will allow for value added options like wireless coupons or ad driven con- tent. Administrators can also take advantage of interaction metrics that are reported back by the digital signage system. These metrics can be used to improve user interface design, spot search trends (for use in facility planning, i.e., where to place more amenities), and to discover hidden user behavior patterns. Buying vs. leasing an interactive wayfinding system. Today, more progressive agencies and manufacturers realize the Moore's law-type effect associated with technology and hardware: what's cutting edge this year, may be obsolete two years after implementation. So how do airports protect themselves from this effect? More and more end-users are electing to lease equipment for terms of 35 years, depending on use. The market will begin to see more facilities elect for lease options that allow them to return equipment at the end of limited terms in exchange for updated equipment. The service model will continue to trend towards a Software as a Service (SaaS) model that has been popularized within other business markets. See Section 6.4.1.2 for additional information on dig- ital directory applications. 7.2.26 Interactive Systems In the interest of expanding customer service, airports have expressed interest in expanding the existing MUFIDS beyond its current boundaries (e.g., to parking garages, rental car facilities, nearby hotels, etc.). As previously discussed, the amount of information required to be presented by the MUFIDS decreases as a passenger approaches their destination (e.g., boarding gate, bag claim device, etc.).