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CHAPTER 5 Curbside and Ground Transportation Although signing cannot overcome physical limitations and geometric difficulties, signing at and along the terminal curbside can boost the efficiency and safety of the space. The terminal curbside and ground transportation areas can be some of the most diverse and complex areas at an airport. Airports need to examine identification, regulatory, and information signing as a whole and consider the philosophy that less signing may be more useful to patrons at the curb- side where so much activity is already taking place. This chapter describes signing suggestions for the curbside/ground transportation areas while maintaining an overall design cohesion across the entire airport. The signing discussed is all exte- rior directions, identification, and informational signs for public use at the following locations: Curbside (Departures and Arrivals) Ground Transportation Curbsides 5.1 Planning for Curbside Signing A comprehensive signing program for terminal curbside areas begins the moment a person approaches terminal and continues past the terminal area. The primary objective of the curb- side/ground transportation sign system is to direct the flow of vehicles and pedestrian traffic to and from the curbsides. To provide an overview of the elements to consider when planning curb- side and ground transportation signing, Figure 5.1 presents a checklist to consider when plan- ning curbside and ground transportation signing. 5.2 Considering Curbside Users in Design (Human Factors) There are two primary factors that impact curbside operations: The number and types of users, e.g., vehicle types, and The dwell times associated with each of these groups34. Figure 5.2 lists the typical users and associated vehicle types found along the terminal curbside. How the space along the curbside is used is highly dependent on the configuration of the ter- minal access roadways. Depending if arriving and departing activities are separated laterally or vertically, the amount of signing and placement of signs may be handled differently. Figure 5.3 provides an example of how public and ground transportation services are physically separated by islands for pedestrian safety and distinction of various activity areas. 77

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78 Wayfinding and Signing Guidelines for Airport Terminals and Landside Area Items Departures Drop-off- Terminal identification Check-In (Vehicular) Distinction of commercial lanes for public traffic and lanes for ground transportation traffic Identification of "drop-off" lanes and "through traffic" lanes Airline identification No stopping/standing areas Re-circulating directions to parking, other terminals, and airport exit Traffic control Departures Drop- Terminal verification off/Check-In Airline identification (Pedestrian) Door number/identification Informational signs No smoking Security requirements Emergency call boxes/telephones Crosswalks Arrivals Pick-up Terminal identification (Vehicular) Distinction of commercial lanes for public traffic and lanes for ground transportation traffic Identification of "pick-up" lanes and "through traffic" lanes Accessible passenger loading zones Exit door/zone identification No stopping/standing areas Re-circulating directions to parking, other terminals, and airport exit Traffic control Arrivals Pick-up Terminal verification (Pedestrian) Door number/identification Distinction of lanes/zones for public pick-up and commercial lanes/zones for ground transportation Informational signs No smoking Security requirements Emergency call boxes/telephones Crosswalks Ground Transportation Distinction of lanes for public traffic and lanes for ground transportation traffic Identification of "pick-up" lanes and "through traffic" lanes Identification of zones for various vehicle types: Taxis Rental Car Shuttles Hotel Shuttles Limos/Towncars Parking Shuttles Other service vehicles Exit door/zone identification No stopping/standing areas Crosswalks Figure 5.1. Curbside signage checklist. User Groups Vehicle Types Private Vehicle Operations Passenger cars, trucks, and SUVs Taxicab Operations Passenger cars and minivans Scheduled Services Buses and vans Non-scheduled Limo and Charter Buses, limousines, town cars Bus Operations Courtesy Vehicle Buses and vans associated with Operations/Shuttles hotels, parking facilities, rental cars, etc. Commercial Operations Armored vehicles, local delivery trucks Emergency/Enforcement Police cars, ambulances, fire Operations trucks Figure 5.2. Curbside users and associated vehicle types.