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NCHRP 20-10(2) (Report 466). This report, titled Desk Reference for Estimating the Indirect Effects of Transportation Projects (The Louis Berger Group, Inc. 2002), builds on NCHRP Report 403 by the same contractor and provides guidance in identifying and estimating the indirect effects of proposed transportation projects. Indirect effects are foreseeable impacts that are caused by a project but occur at a removed location or a later time. These effects can be a source of substantial impacts of a social and economic nature. They also can cause important impacts related to natural resources, cultural resources, and accessibility. Citizen's Handbook on Environmental Justice. A recent publication from the Institute of Transportation Studies titled Environmental Justice and Transportation: A Citizen's Handbook (ITS 2003) is intended to introduce community members and concerned citizens to environmental justice and its role in the transportation planning process. Whereas the Citizen's Handbook is intended for the general public, this guidebook has been written for the practitioner. The guidebook therefore assumes a certain level of background and experience with transportation planning processes and environmental justice concepts. When more detailed introductory information is needed or in situations where this guidebook or any of its methods are to be presented to a lay audience, it would be useful to incorporate many of the ideas presented in the Citizen's Handbook. RESOURCES 1) Cambridge Systematics, Inc. 2002. Technical Methods to Support Analysis of Environmental Justice Issues. Final report of project NCHRP Project 8-36(11). Transportation Research Board, National Research Council. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. 2) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). 1996. Community Impact Assessment: A Quick Reference for Transportation. Washington, DC: FHWA. Available at http://www.ciatrans.net/TABLE.html. 3) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). 2003. Community Impact Assessment. Washington, DC: FHWA. Available at http://www.ciatrans.net/index.shtml. 4) Forkenbrock, David J., and Glen E. Weisbrod. 2001. Guidebook for Assessing the Social and Economic Effects of Transportation Projects. NCHRP Report 456. Transportation Research Board, National Research Council. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Also available at http://trb.org/trb/publications/nchrp/nchrp_rpt_456-a.pdf. 5) Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS). 2003. Environmental Justice and Transportation: A Citizen's Handbook. Berkeley, CA: University of California Berkeley. Available at http://www.its.berkeley.edu/publications/ejhandbook/ej.html. 6) The Louis Berger Group, Inc. 2002. Desk Reference for Estimating the Indirect Effects of Transportation Projects. NCHRP Report 466. Transportation Research Board, National Research Council. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Also available at http://gulliver.trb.org/publications/nchrp/nchrp_rpt_466.pdf. 7) United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT). 2003. Environmental justice effective practices Web site, http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/ejustice/effect/index.htm. 17