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Appendix B: Instructor PowerPoint Slides and Notes Welcome! Welcome to the Hazard and Security Plan Workshop Module One 1 Use this slide to focus the projector before the class begins and leave this slide "on" while the students enter the classroom and go to their seats. B-1

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Hazard and Security Plan (HSP) Workshop TCRP Project No. J-10D Module One 2 This training is intended for people who want to take a more proactive approach to their system hazards and security issues. While September 11, 2001 brought front and center the worrisome changes that have occurred in our world, some hazards and extreme security issues have always existed. This training will help you take a systematic approach to all your hazard and potential security problems. After this workshop you will have a better understanding of a hazard and security plan on a personal level, a family level and an organizational level. It will be helpful for you to understand the need for a personal and family security plan as you complete the security plan for your organization. B-2

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Project No. J-10D Security Planning Tools for Rural, Small Urban, and Community-Based Public Transportation Operations The Hazard and Security Plan (HSP) Prepared for Transit Cooperative Research Program TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD National Research Council NAS-NRC by AECOM Consult 2751 Prosperity Avenue, Suite 300 Fairfax, VA 22031 in association with Maier Consulting Peter Schauer Associates Module One 3 The workshop materials were prepared under TCRP project number J-10D. The principals who played a role in developing the course are listed here. Introduce workshop leader and any other members of the training team who will be in attendance during the workshop. Introduce all workshop attendees. What are their names? Their system names and locations? B-3

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Workshop Goals Provide participant learners with the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully develop and implement a hazard and security plan at their agency: 1. Develop and foster a reasonable approach to hazards and security 2. Become familiar with the terms and elements of hazard and security planning 3. Draft an HSP (hazard and security plan) Module One 4 This workshop is designed to help you construct and complete the HSP document. Your completion of the HSP will help you address any hazard or security problems you might face in the future. B-4

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Your Workshop Materials Agenda Class Roster Discussion notes (slides) HSP Yellow highlighter Sticky notes and markers HSP instructions HSP Idea file CD with HSP and sample policies and procedures Module One 5 Go through list and how to use each item. Agenda: The agenda gives the main time points for breaks and lunch. I have a specific idea of how much time each section will take and we will cover all the material, but the pace of the course will be determined by your questions and discussion. Class Roster: The class roster is provided, and you are encouraged to get to know your fellow students and network after the workshop is over. Discussion notes (slides): You have copies of the slides and you can keep track of the discussion by referring to your discussion notes. The discussion notes will tell you what page to turn to in your template for our discussions. Hazard and Security Plan: This template is for you to use to finish your plan. This document is your template. At the end of this workshop you should have your notes on it so when you go back to your office you can finish your plan. Yellow highlighter, sticky notes and markers: These items are to help you take notes and mark your plan so it will be easy for you to make your final changes at your office. HSP instructions: This is the "how-to" thinner workbook that gives you background on the document and guidance on completing the template. HSP Idea file: All sorts of ideas can be put in the file. Clippings, notes and other materials will help you as you update your HSP. CD with HSP and policy examples: This CD contains the HSP template in MS WORD that you will adapt to your specific conditions and sample policies from across the United States. B-5

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Workshop Ground Rules All ideas are welcome. Observe timeframes. Listen to each other through "active listening." Differences and problems are acknowledged--not "worked." Use the mental picture method, your imagination and make meaning. Module One 6 The workshop ground rules are for the students. Briefly discuss each item. All ideas are welcome. When specific timeframes are set, please stay on track. Active listening means you are listening to each other and not formulating your own comment while others are talking. Likely we will have some differences of opinion and since all ideas are welcome and the time is short we will acknowledge differences of opinion and agree to move forward. Using the mental picture method and making meaning means the participant imagines how the material can be used in their own situation. Emphasize that the success of the workshop depends on the participants actively participating, providing information where appropriate, and "making their own meaning." The student is ultimately responsible for "making meaning" and completing his or her own hazard and security plan. You, as the workshop leader, are responsible for the following: Set timeframes and tasks clearly before the students. Direct large-group discussions. Keep the purpose of the workshop focused and keep the class energized by frequently asking students for their ideas. Act as a resource person whenever possible. Ensure that all housekeeping details are managed and the learning environment is maintained. B-6

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Workshop and HSP Success The missing ingredient in hazard and security planning is often imagination...imagine! Feed your curiosity, your "worry-wart," the slightly paranoid side of your brain. The best managers are slightly paranoid, but to prevent problems they take action...Take Action! Module One 7 (Quickly review each item on the slide and emphasize that imagination is the key to completing a thorough HSP document.) Too often, when some security or hazard event happens, the persons involved are heard to say things like "I never imagined the water would come up so high!" "I never imagined anyone could get in our building through that door." "I never imagined anyone would fly an airplane...." So imagination is the key, and slight paranoia fostered by your worry-wart will help you complete your plan and take reasonable action. Reasonable action is at the core of this workshop. B-7

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The Hazard and Security Plan A hazard and security plan (HSP) is a template for producing a transit agency security plan. Includes documents, responsibilities, training assignments, and related materials. Uses an "all hazards" framework--an approach flexible enough to be applied to more than one type of event or situation. Module One 8 Quickly review each item on the slide and emphasize that imagination is the key to completing a thorough HSP document. B-8

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Plan Organization Outline Purpose and Your ideas, needs Scope of the Plan FEMA guidance State and local emergency plans FTA plans Who Does What? Transit examples Detailed Solutions to FTA guidance Likely Issues Non-transit policies Other guidance Keeping the Plan Current Module One 9 There are four sections of the plan. The first details what the plan is intended to do. The second describes who is responsible for different activities in the plan. The third covers solutions to typical issues facing an agency. And finally, the last describes how to keep the plan current. B-9

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Resent...that we even have to... "Over there." Here Invasive plants. Kudzu There ...the altered landscape What do you expect when you purchase a chain saw or other power tool? Play book just like a sports team or a dance choreography...but you have to practice, practice, practice... Module One 10 (Note: Animation: After slide is up when you read "Play book..." click once for graphic. Read script and click to next slide.) There is a certain resentment, disdain and almost anger that we as Americans have to be thinking about and preparing for terrorism, security and other issues. Many transit managers resent that they have to take time out of their busy schedule to prepare a plan and practice their plan. America is a wonderfully "wide open" and tolerant place. As has been noted by others, for years Americans have felt comfortable in their existence with friendly neighbors to the north, Canada, and friendly neighbors to the south, Mexico, and large oceans to our east and west separating us from all the unfortunate events "over there." But after September 11 "over there" became "here," and America had to adjust, and some of the innocent openness of our country was lost. That was then and this is now. Think about a telephone pole that is being covered by the invasive Kudzu vine of the South. Invasive plants disrupt the harmony of local fields and forests. They displace "normal plants." There are many invasive and non-native plants that have changed the look and ecology of the Hawaiian Islands, Florida, the fields and forests of the Midwest and the Mountains and range of the West. These invasive plants have created an altered landscape. Farmers, ranchers and conservationists have to constantly work to eradicate the invasive plants, and most of the invasive plants we will never eradicate. So too the events of September 11 altered the landscape of our secure existence. Just as it is unlikely that the invasive Kudzu vine will ever be eradicated from the South, it is unlikely that we will ever go back to pre-September 11 security conditions. We might be able to get the Kudzu off the telephone poles but it will eventually grow back there or somewhere else...it is a successful invader. So if you have some disdain for this process you are coached to think realistically and prepare for the new day of the altered landscape. You must think realistically. If you buy a new chainsaw or any power tool you will find paragraph after paragraph of cautions and alerts for how to use the power tool. But if you have a need for the power tool you accept those cautions and alerts and get on with the work at hand. So too with preparing a hazard and security plan. There are certain inherent dangers in providing transit, so it is best we prepare for them and get on with the important work of serving those who need transportation. Finally, once you get your plan finished, you need to practice the key activities and do it often and periodically. If you do not practice your plan it would be like having a play book for a sports team and not learning or practicing the plays. To win games you have to follow the play book. Improvise plays or ignore the play book and you will find yourself "riding the pine" or, worse, kicked off the team. So make your plan and practice it often. B-10

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Any plan is better than no plan. "In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable." Dwight D. Eisenhower Supreme Allied Commander in WWII, Europe 34th US president Module One 11 (Emphasize that at a minimum, by going through the planning process, situations have been thought about and relationships established with various staff and other agencies.) And almost any plan, even on a piece of butcher paper, is better than no plan at all. B-11

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Family: Threats to Your Home Fire Possible Occurrences Roof Leak Impact of occurrence Dog Soils Rug Probability of occurrence Module Six 143 There is a wide range of potential problems or threats that could either directly or indirectly affect you and your family in your home. These occurrences range from the likely to the rare. So we are likely to spend more time training or cleaning up after our dog than preparing for a house fire. B-143

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Your Transit System Threats Terrorism Possible Occurrences Robberies/Assaults Impact of occurrence Vandalism Probability of occurrence Module Six 144 There is a wide range of potential acts or threats that could either directly or indirectly affect your transportation system. These acts include vandalism, theft, robberies, assaults and other types of workplace violence, all the way up to terrorism. As the graph shows, terrorism and other high-level violent acts will have a greater impact on the system, its employees, and the public, but their probability of occurrence is much lower. This disparity is due in large part to the complexity and necessary effort required to pull off an act of terrorism. Reports indicate that the attacks of September 11 were being planned for close to eight years, while instances of vandalism are often spontaneous and not planned. B-144

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Your Area of Prime Responsibility Terrorism Possible Occurrences Robberies/Assaults Impact of occurrence You! Vandalism Probability of occurrence Module Six 145 Finally, remember that you will only be primarily responsible for those activities that have modest or low consequences. We discussed this slide earlier and remember... ...the light blue shaded areas of the graph show those areas that you have prime responsibility for and in general you are the first to tackle the situation. This graph shows it is unlikely you will be responsible for an act of terrorism as a first responder, but you may be asked to respond in some way--evacuation or communication--so we include some element of all possible occurrences in our HSP. You will only have prime responsibility for those activities that have modest or low consequences. Some other agency will be the primary responder on the major events, but you need to know who that is and what your role will be. B-145

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All-Hazards Security & Emergency Preparedness: Your Areas of Prime Responsibilities Prevent incidents within control and responsibility of transit system Respond to situations and events Mitigate loss Protect passengers, personnel, and critical assets Support community response with equipment and capabilities Recover from major events with available resources and programs Module Six 146 While the previous slide provided an idea of your areas of responsibilities in specific situations, this slide sets out the generic, all- encompassing areas of responsibilities for your transit service. B-146

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Summary and Review Take five minutes and sketch out a calendar of events for finalizing your HSP. For what areas of the HSP do you feel you need more assistance or background material? Module Six 147 (Review the slide.) What are the five countermeasures discussed in this class? 1. Prevention 2. Mitigation 3. Preparedness 4. Response 5. Recovery Do you need more assistance or background material with any of the five areas? (Coach the students to plan how they'll finish their HSP--contact names and numbers, distribution and more.) B-147

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Resources Transit agencies are encouraged to seek help... Law enforcement Local emergency managers Review state and regional plans Reference materials (such as FEMA How-To guides) Work with other transit agencies Map out hazards Module Six 148 It is important to seek all the resources that are available to you. Local agencies can help you map out hazards and procedures. Even your drivers can help you identify hazards if you have them do a sketch map of the service area, as we did earlier in the workshop. B-148

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Resources Websites: Department of Homeland Security www.ready.gov Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov American Red Cross www.redcross.org Module Six 149 These websites and their many links will provide you with a lot of valuable information and resources for developing an action plan that best suits you, your organization, and your family. As you learn the jargon of security, you will hear people referring to DHS--make sure you know whether someone is talking about the Department of Homeland Security or the Department or Division of Human Services. B-149

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Resources Websites: Transportation Research Board www.trb.org Federal Transit Administration www.fta.dot.gov Volpe Center www.transit-safety.volpe.dot.gov Also see the resource list in the HSP and CD-ROM Module Six 150 The Volpe site is officially FTA's Safety and Security Home Page where agencies can find all sorts of information on emergency response, planning, security planning, and FTA safety and security resources. B-150

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Evaluation Please complete the evaluation form. Each person share with the group something you learned or changed as a result of our time together. Each person tell the group when you will complete your HSP. Module Six 151 (Hand out evaluation forms and have students take five minutes to complete the evaluation. Then go around the room and have students answer the two questions in the slide.) B-151

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Credits and Footnotes Slides 30, 106, 144: Transit Workplace Safety and Security Instructor Package. Federal Transit Administration. National Transit Institute. For general discussion of deer and anxiety, Slides 13, 14, 137: Marks, I. M., & Nesse, R. M. (1994). Fear and fitness: An evolutionary analysis of anxiety disorders. Ethology and Sociobiology, 15, pages 247-261. Module Six 152 NTI has many presentations and is a good resource. If you want to know more about the survival value of fear and response, review the article by Marks and Nesse. B-152

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Adjourn (But never adjourn safety or security!) Until Next Time, Thank You! Module Six 153 Show slide and thank students for their participation. B-153