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I-1 APPENDIX I SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, CASE STUDY 1 INTRODUCTION Sharing information needed to facilitate joint operations of highways. This idea may include but is not limited to Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) CAD access and user training; real-time traffic flow, and Washington State Patrol (WSP) have a long history of road, collision, and weather information; video surveil- cooperatively managing traffic incidents in the Seattle met- lance; video road inventories; speed data; and geospatial ropolitan area, as well as developing and implementing data data, including interchange drawings. and communications systems that support traffic incident Creating a joint policy for data sharing that includes, management (TIM). This section describes the institutional among other things, content and formatting, documen- framework and initiatives that underpin these activities, as tation and meta-data, collection and update methods and well as the roles and responsibilities of both WSDOT and procedures, accuracy, update cycles, and stewardship. WSP as they relate to TIM. Memoranda of understanding will be used to document the sharing of information for the items addressed in the 1.1 Institutional Framework joint policy. Coordinating public information messages and outreach WSP and WSDOT have traditionally approached TIM in a on issues that affect agencies and/or their customers. coordinated and cooperative manner. Effective incident man- Sample areas of coordination include highway incidents, agement in the Seattle metropolitan area is further supported special events (such as winter and mountain pass driv- by information sharing at the programmatic and operational ing), the "Give `Em a Brake" campaign, or new policy levels. Three primary initiatives have set the stage for the insti- initiatives such as "Steer it and Clear It." tutional coordination and cooperation between WSDOT and Communicating timely and accurate information to the WSP that have resulted in enhanced TIM activities through public on traffic and travel conditions, including restric- information sharing: tions and information on incidents to allow the public to make decisions about their traveling convenience and A joint operations policy statement (JOPS), safety. Joint development of a WSP computer-aided dispatching Assisting motorists with service patrols by clearing lane- (CAD) system and the WSDOT Traffic System Manage- blocking debris and disabled vehicles and their occu- ment Center (TSMC) interface, and pants and resolving other problems within the ability and The Smart Trek Metropolitan Model Deployment Ini- scope of WSP and WSDOT. tiative (MMDI). Coordinating all public and private resources in the effort to clear incidents within 90 minutes. This includes using resources to expedite responding to incidents, efficiently 1.1.1 Joint Operations Policy Statement and effectively conducting needed investigations, and reducing highway lane and state-designated ferry route WSP and WSDOT have cooperatively developed a work- closures to a minimum. ing agreement referred to as a joint operations policy state- ment (JOPS). The purpose of the JOPS is to document the A copy of the JOPS is attached to this appendix. joint policy positions between the two agencies regarding issues of mutual interest in operating Washington State High- ways. The WSP Chief and the Washington State Secretary of 1.1.2 CAD-ATMS Integration Transportation both endorse the JOPS for statewide imple- mentation. The Seattle metropolitan region has taken the lead In the late 1980s, WSDOT and WSP entered into a joint in implementing the concepts identified in the JOPS. venture to disseminate WSP CAD data to WSDOT. The From an institutional perspective, the JOPS makes many activities that were required to develop, implement, and references regarding programmatic directions that relate operate the system further illustrated the high level of insti- directly to TIM and the sharing of information, including tutional coordination and commitment of the two agencies. the following: In early 2003, WSP and WSDOT entered into a federally sponsored cooperative agreement for a field operational test Leveraging the advantages of co-location, including (FOT) to integrate intelligent transportation system (ITS) WSDOT TSMCs and WSP dispatch centers. technologies and CAD systems from multiple vendors across

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I-2 organizational boundaries. This CAD-ATMS integration vices management; and regional, multimodal traveler infor- project is structured around WSP and WSDOT's capability mation services. to cooperatively manage multiagency incidents with signifi- cant multimodal transportation challenges, ranging from 1.2 Roles and Responsibilities automobile crashes to natural and non-natural disasters. WSP and WSDOT are cooperatively approaching the inte- Many of WSP and WSDOT's TIM activities and coordina- gration between CAD and the advanced traffic management tion result from longstanding working relationships between system (ATMS) using applicable standards that enable the two agencies. Roles and responsibilities of both agencies exchange of traffic management information systems and pub- as they relate to TIM are detailed below. lic safety dispatch information systems. This integration will further facilitate existing exchanges of information between the WSP CAD system and the WSDOT TSMC information 1.2.1 WSDOT systems. Ultimately, benefits related to locating and respond- ing to the incident, including on-scene activities and incident WSDOT, created by the Washington State Legislature in documentation, will be realized. 1977, is responsible for managing most of the state's trans- Commitment to cooperatively manage incidents is demon- portation infrastructure, including approximately 7,048 cen- strated in that WSDOT provided WSP with capital resources terline miles of state roadways. WSDOT is organized into to help procure WSP's new CAD systems. WSDOT also has executive staff, five service centers, three modal divisions, a technical representative supporting the procurement of the and six operating regions. The state's transportation infra- CAD system that is a focal point of this project and that will structure is managed through four major programs: mainte- enhance the existing interface with WSDOT. nance, operations, preservation, and improvements. Central to WSDOT's incident management functions are the incident response teams (IRTs) that are operated in each of 1.1.3 Smart Trek Model Deployment Initiative its six regions. IRTs are specially trained groups of WSDOT maintenance employees who respond to blocking incidents WSDOT has a long history of cooperatively implement- on state highways and freeways. IRT vehicles are available ing, operating, and supporting advanced technologies with 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to provide traffic control, traf- regional partners, like WSP, to support transportation opera- fic rerouting, mobile communications, and incident clearance tions and traffic incident management. Under the leadership of and clean up. IRTs also assist motorists with changing flat tires, WSDOT and supported by WSP, the Seattle metropolitan area jump starts, directions, and many other types of calls for assis- was selected in 1997 as one of four federally funded national tance. WSDOT has operated the IRT program since 1990 (2). Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiatives (MMDIs) that In the Seattle metropolitan area, IRTs are dispatched from the focused on aggressive deployment of regionwide intelligent WSDOT TSMC. IRTs can be requested by WSP for assistance transportation systems (ITS) (1). Seattle's MMDI efforts are through communication with the WSDOT traffic system oper- collectively referred to as Smart Trek. ations specialist. Recognizing the significant potential benefits of sharing In addition, to help support incident management efforts, information between WSP and WSDOT Smart Trek included WSDOT currently operates five traffic management centers a project that specifically addresses the need to share informa- (TMCs) throughout the state, including the Northwest Region tion between WSP and WSDOT--a regional fiber-optic back- TSMC that services the Puget Sound cities of Seattle, Everett, bone. The backbone interconnects a diverse coalition of and Tacoma. The TSMC is the central processing and opera- regional, multimodal traffic and transit data and information tional facility for freeway, tunnel, and selected arterial man- sources. This interconnection improves capabilities to receive, agement systems in the Seattle metropolitan area. TSMC flow process, and prepare freeway and arterial traffic and transit operations cover 124 miles on I-5, I-405, I-90, State Route data for further distribution to ISP and to other users. The inter- (SR) 167, and SR 520. The current system includes 3,000 connection is also used for transportation research and the loop sensors that collect traffic flow data, more than 250 exchange of CAD data and has resulted in enhanced system closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras, a fiber-optic com- monitoring and traffic control through a regional, multiagency, munication system, 113 ramp metering systems operating on advanced transportation management system. The backbone 75 freeway ramps, and numerous motorist call boxes. enables video sharing between WSDOT and WSP. The TSMC is operational 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The institutional structures that underpinned Smart Trek The facility collects, integrates, processes, and disseminates deployments also provided transportation and public safety regional freeway system information. The facility and the agencies with the ability to cooperatively increase levels of regional roadway ITS infrastructure include traffic surveil- service to the traveling public through the integration of tra- lance to detect traffic flows on the freeways, fixed and pan- ditional functions of traffic signal control; transit management; tilt-zoom CCTV to allow WSDOT operators to observe traf- freeway management; incident management; emergency ser- fic on the freeways, and ramp metering systems to regulate

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I-3 the flow rate of traffic entering freeways. In addition, more Investigative Services Bureau, Major Accidents Inves- than 45 variable message signs (VMSs) are installed on the tigations Team (MAIT); and freeways in the region, 7 highway advisory radio (HAR) sta- Technical Services Bureau, Communications Division. tions are in operation, and several weather stations are dis- tributed throughout the region. The communications division of the WSP Technical Ser- WSDOT also has a history of working cooperatively with vices Bureau operates a 24/7 statewide emergency communi- the media in the Seattle metropolitan area. This history enables cations system that includes eight centers statewide. The divi- the agency to offer accurate and timely traffic information to sion provides emergency dispatch services for mobile units of travelers. The area's major television stations have direct WSP, the Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Liquor Con- video connections that permit them to select the view of any trol Board, the Department of Transportation, state parks, and CCTV camera. These stations also have a connection to (1) the federal agencies. Duties performed by the communications "FLOW" congestion map for real-time traffic conditions and division include (2) information on construction activities and incidents. The FLOW map is available to the public on WSDOT's Internet Receiving, relaying, and dispatching emergency calls home page and averages over 100,000 hits each day (3). for services; Dispatching services provided to line troopers and other 1.2.2 WSP state agencies; Providing assistance to the public via telephone or in WSP is organized into seven bureaus that administer the person; activities of nearly 1,000 commissioned offices and more than Using CAD to dispatch officers to calls; 1,000 noncommissioned personnel. Bureaus include Working with other law enforcement agencies and com- munications centers; and Field operations, Answering all regional cellular 911 calls. Fire protection, Forensic laboratory services, Investigative services, 1.3 Study Approach and Methodology Management services, In August 2002, specific data related to information Technical services, and exchanges between WSDOT and WSP were collected during Offices of the chief. site visits to (1) WSDOT's Northwest Region TSMC located The primary response to traffic incidents on highways in Shoreline, Washington, and (2) the WSP communications owned and operated by the state of Washington is provided by center located in Bellevue, Washington. Site visits provided WSP. Duties administered by WSP include patrolling and con- researchers with the opportunity to observe data sharing and ducting accident investigations on highways owned and oper- communication between the two agencies in the context of ated by the state of Washington. WSP commissioned traffic actual operations. Site visits entailed observations of actual officers also work traffic law enforcement. These positions operations and an extensive question and answer session. Peri- include odic follow-up phone interviews were also conducted with the hosts to collect and verify additional information. Traffic officers (troopers), Traffic sergeants, 1.4 Acknowledgments Traffic assistance detectives, Traffic assistant detective sergeants, and The key contributors to the Seattle case study are Lieutenants and command officers assigned to the field operations. Jerry Althauser, Maintenance/Operations Superinten- dent--Traffic, WSDOT; WSP is divided into eight geographical areas organized as Bill Legg, Assistant ITS Program Engineer, WSDOT-- districts. Troopers in District 2 (headquartered in Bellevue) Washington State Transportation Center; and are responsible for responding to incidents on state-owned Linda Spaetig, WSP. facilities in the Seattle metropolitan area. WSP units involved in response to TIM include 2 INFORMATION-SHARING METHODS Office of the State Fire Marshall, Emergency Mobiliza- tion Section; As mentioned, WSDOT and WSP have a long history of Field Operations Bureau, Statewide Incident Response cooperatively managing traffic incidents in the Seattle met- Team (SIRT); ropolitan area. Various methods are used to communicate at

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I-4 the scene of the incident and between operations personnel communications room. The traffic system operations special- in the communications or operations centers. Because of the ist uses this information to dispatch the IRT and update trav- maturity of the agencies and their level of institutional coor- eler information. dination, information-sharing activities between WSP and The data sent via the current CAD system are archived. WSDOT serve as a model for many other transportation agen- However, they are difficult to process for future analysis. The cies and public safety agencies around the nation. Described process of entering the data into the traveler information sys- below are the remote voice, text transfer, and other media tem is not automated. It must be keyed in by an operator in the and advanced methods that WSP and WSDOT use to com- TSMC. However, the new CAD-TMC integration will sig- municate when managing traffic incidents. nificantly increase the systems functionality, as will be dis- cussed later. Recognizing that the first generation of the system was 2.1 Remote Voice beneficial, WSDOT and WSP are currently developing a next generation of the system to further enhance information shar- Voice communication at the incident scene between ing. To make this system deployment even more timely, WSDOT and WSP is also accomplished using the WSP radio WSP is in the process of procuring and installing a new CAD systems. IRT operators are equipped with WSP radios that system for statewide use. This system will maintain state-of- enable the operators to communicate with officers respond- the-art dispatching across the entire state of Washington and ing to the same incident. Use of the WSP radio also enables bring all dispatchers to a common platform. The two agen- WSDOT to communicate with local fire departments via a cies have worked cooperatively in this procurement. Com- common frequency. This frequency does not enable WSDOT mitment to information sharing between the two agencies is or WSP to communicate with fire dispatch. further illustrated in that WSDOT has provided funding for The WSP call center and WSDOT TSMC communicate WSP's procurement of the system and has provided a via an intercom system. This system enables the WSP dis- WSDOT representative on the procurement committee. patcher to communicate directly with a traffic system opera- WSDOT operates the Condition Acquisition and Report- tions specialist in the TSMC communications center 24 hours ing System (CARS). WSDOT dispatchers use CARS to record a day, 7 days a week. Essentially, for after-hour calls, if a accident, construction, traffic, and road condition events. responding officer requests assistance from the IRT at the CARS is viewed by WSDOT dispatchers to assist in roadway incident scene, the officer contacts the WSP dispatcher via response, and it supplies a portion of the traveler information radio and requests assistance. The WSP dispatcher then con- content in WSDOT's 511 system and Internet pages. tacts a WSDOT traffic system operations specialist in the call Further assisted by an FHWA cooperative agreement, the center via the intercom system. The WSDOT traffic system new WSP CAD system and the WSDOT CARS system will operations specialist in turn dispatches the IRT to the inci- be integrated. As part of this system, three components will dent scene. Conversely, if needed, the WSDOT traffic sys- be developed to work together in a system called the Unified tem operations specialist can contact the WSP dispatcher via Incident Information System (UIIS). The overall vision for the intercom system if needed. UIIS is to facilitate open communications between the WSP CAD system and the WSDOT CARS system in a manner that 2.2 Text Transfer improves emergency response and traveler information distri- bution without causing any additional burdens on the already For many years, WSP has provided incident data to busy emergency response and radio operations staff. UIIS WSDOT via a WSP CAD terminal located in the TSMC. components include the following: Information provided by WSP typically includes incident location, nature of the incident, and resulting lane closures. Primary Alert--Serves as a direct line of communica- This information is filtered and read-only. tion from WSP to WSDOT. At the core of the primary To enable the provision of data dissemination to WSDOT, alert is an institutional filter to ensure that only appropri- data are collected in the field by the responding WSP officer. ate information reaches WSDOT and that any details not The officer enters the incident data into the CAD system at suited for public consumption are not exchanged. Within the scene, and the data are transmitted to the WSP call cen- 1 minute from the time an event is entered into the WSP ter in Bellevue. The data are then processed to remove any CAD system, a filtered report will appear before every sensitive information, such as crash victim's name or vehicle relevant WSDOT CARS user. The filtered report will be tag information, and are then sent to the TSMC. geo-coded, and a map will be provided on an on-screen Upon receiving the data, operators in the TSMC manually display. enter the location, nature, and duration of the incident into Using the institutional filter, data communicated from WSDOT's traveler information system. This system includes the WSP CAD system to WSDOT will include website and 511 information. The traffic system operations The agency entering the incident, specialist in the TSMC also has a WSP CAD terminal in the The identification of the operator,

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I-5 The text of the message relating to the incident, operates more than 250 CCTVs throughout the Seattle metro- The time and date on which the incident record is politan area. Cameras are currently deployed on SR-167, I-5, created, I-405, SR-520, SR-99, and SR-90. More cameras are contin- The location of the incident, ually implemented throughout the Seattle metropolitan area The type of incident, and further enhance WSP's ability to monitor traffic. The incident priority, Through an operational agreement, WSDOT provides WSP The status of the incident, with the images from these cameras. In addition, WSDOT pro- The incident detail, and vides WSP with secondary control of the cameras. This func- The tracking number for the incident. tion enables WSP to view the incident scene, verify inci- Response Support--Enables the WSDOT traffic system dents, and dispatch additional officers if needed. As with the operations specialist to provide WSP dispatchers with CAD data, CCTV images are communicated to the call cen- information about other conditions surrounding the inci- ter via the fiber-optic backbone that, as previously discussed, dent location. As an example, traffic, construction, or was a project included in Smart Trek. adverse weather conditions that could affect the trooper's response will be provided to dispatchers to provide the safest and most efficient response. Response support 3 REFERENCES respects any concerns from WSP about inserting ele- ments of nonemergency into the CAD system. To make 1. The Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative (MMDI) was an this noninvasive, a dynamic web page with the conditions aggressive deployment of ITS at four urban sites: New York/ will be created that can be linked to and from the WSP New Jersey/Connecticut, Phoenix, San Antonio, and Seattle. CAD system. These sites were chosen because of their high level of pre-existing Secondary Alert--Offers a direct line of communica- ITS and because of the promise of evaluating the integration of tion to a number of secondary responders, including these legacy ITS components together with new ITS components. emergency medical services (EMS), towing and recovery 2. Washington State's Incident Response Team Program Evalua- service providers, and utility companies. Secondary alert tion. Washington State Transportation Center (TRAC). Draft Final--Research Project T9903, Task 58. May 1997. Prepared transfers incident information to responders about events for Washington State Transportation Commission. in the WSP CAD system and the WSDOT CARS system. 3. Systems Overview Specification. Metropolitan Model Deploy- ment Initiative Project of the Washington State Department of 2.3 Other Media and Advanced Methods Transportation, Regional and Local Partners, Commercial and Academic Partners, and the United States Department of Another element of information sharing between WSDOT Transportation. Version 2.0--March 23, 1999. http://depts. and WSP is the exchange of video images. WSDOT currently washington.edu/trac/mdi/partners/pdf/sos.pdf

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I-6 ATTACHMENT TO APPENDIX I A JOINT OPERATIONS POLICY STATEMENT

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I-7 Index 1. Agency Missions and Organizational Alignment a) Washington State Patrol b) Washington State Department of Transportation c) Joint Operations 2. Data Sharing a) General b) Budget 3. Traffic Management a) Coordinated Public Communication i) Traveler Information ii) Media b) Service Patrols c) Enforcement processes d) Incident response i) Road Ranger Program ii) Hazardous material handling iii) Tow truck use iv) Accident clearance and civil liability (Damaged Load Clearance) v) Expedited investigations vi) Incident Command System e) Event planning f) Disaster Response g) Winter driving 4. Work Zone Safety 5. Commercial Vehicles a) Weigh Stations b) Permitting and Weight Enforcement c) Commercial Vehicle Safety Inspections d) CVISN / WIM 6. Joint Facilities 7. Wireless Communication 8. Washington State Ferries 9. Transportation System Security 10. Safety Rest Areas 11. Policy Performance Measures 12. Policy training 13. Policy Update Process 14. Appendices

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I-8 1. Agency Missions and Organizational Alignment a) Washington State Patrol The Washington State Patrol (WSP) was established in 1921 and operates under the authority of R.C.W. 43.43.010, which gives full police powers to the commissioned officers of the department. The Washington State Patrol is comprised of the following six bureaus; Field Operations Bureau (FOB) Investigative Services Bureau (ISB) Technical Services Bureau (TSB) State Fire Protection Bureau Forensic Services Bureau Management Services Bureau The Chief of the WSP commands all department employees. The chain of command continues as follows; Deputy Chiefs are appointed by the Chief, this person is in charge of a bureau. Captains are appointed by the Chief, these people command a district or other command area and are accountable to a bureau commander; Lieutenants are appointed on a permanent basis from a promotional list; they command a section, unit, or other command area and are accountable to a captain; Sergeants are appointed on a permanent basis from a promotional list; they supervise a section, detachment or unit; and Trooper are a permanent appointment by the Chief upon graduation from the academy The Washington State Patrol (commissioned) traffic officers work traffic law enforcement or in direct support of traffic enforcement. These positions include: Traffic officers (troopers); Traffic sergeants; Traffic assistance detectives; Traffic assistance detective sergeants; and Lieutenants and command officers assigned to the Field Operations Bureau The WSP is divided into eight geographical areas designated as districts. A captain who is directly accountable to the FOB commander commands each of these districts. The distribution of troopers is based on service needs within each districts' Autonomous Patrol Area (APA). An APA is an area within a district where specific detachments patrol and respond to calls for service.

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I-9 Some investigations may require immediate response and investigation. The Traffic Investigation Division (TID) provides specialized investigative services. Upon receiving notification from a traffic sergeant or a district command officer the appropriate TID supervisor shall assign a detective to conduct follow up investigations. The TID commander (captain) is directly accountable to the ISB commander. The Commercial Vehicle Division (CVD) is responsible for commercial vehicle safety requirements, to include freight terminal safety audits under R.C.W. 46.32.080. The CVD commander (captain) is directly accountable to the ISB commander. The communications division is responsible to expedite communications between mobile units and District offices as well as other governmental agencies and the general public. The regional communications centers are located at the district headquarters offices. These communications centers operate 24 hours a day to ensure timely response and availability for calls for service. The Communications Division manager is directly accountable to the TSB commander. The Property Management Division (PMD) is responsible for providing facilities management through the capital and operating budget process. The PMD manager is directly accountable to the Management Service Bureau. This division consists of the following three sections: Fleet; Supply; and Property Management. The Information Technology Division (ITD) provides the WSP with technology and software engineering, as well as field support. This includes mobile radio and statewide telecommunications (microwave, data, and voice). The division also provides project management, application development, a 24-hour help desk, and system maintenance. The ITD manager is directly accountable to the TSB commander. The Government and Media Relations office serves two functions for the Office of the Chief. The commander of this office (captain) serves as the WSP's legislative liaison, responsible for coordinating agency legislation with legislators, committees, and other state agencies. The liaison also reviews and seeks input from interested stakeholders on agency legislation and answers policy questions for legislative constituents. This office also handles all statewide media relations for the agency. Budget and Fiscal Services is responsible for the management off all WSP financial activities and allotting the department's operating and capital budgets. The commander (captain) of this office is directly accountable to the Management Service Bureau.

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I-10 b) Washington State Department of Transportation The Washington State Department of Transportation was first created by the State Legislature as a State Highway Department in 1905. It was further organized into highway districts (the precursor to today's Transportation Regions) in 1925. In 1951, the State Highway Commission was formed to govern the Highway Department. Further, the Highway Department also assumed the functions of the then Puget Sound Ferry System. In 1977, today's Department of Transportation was created. The Transportation Commission governs the policy and budget actions of the Department, as well as selecting the Secretary of Transportation. The Commission is a seven member body, appointed by the Governor, and represents all transportation interests in Washington. Commissioners serve six year terms and no more than four of them can be from the same side of the state or affiliated with the same political party. The mission of the WSDOT is to "keep people and business moving by operating and improving the state transportation systems vital to our taxpayers and communities." The Department of Transportation is organized with a headquarters function to provide centralized guidance and a field function to provide decentralized implementation of transportation policies. The Secretary of Transportation is an ex-officio member of the Transportation Commission and is the chief executive officer of the DOT. The Office of the Secretary of Transportation contains the following functions: 1. Chief of Staff 2. Engineering and Regional Operations Division This Division includes Planning and Capital Programs, Environmental and Engineering Programs, and Maintenance and Operations Programs. The Maintenance and Operations Programs include the Maintenance Office; Traffic Office; Facilities and Equipment Office (which includes Radio) and Employee Safety Programs. Four of the six transportation regions report to this Division (Southwest, North Central, South Central, and Eastern) 3. Northwest Division This Division includes the Northwest Region, the Olympic Region, and the Urban Corridors Office. 4. Washington State Ferries 5. Administration and Support 6. Audit Office 7. Equal Opportunity Office DOT Transportation regions are led by Region Administrators who report to the Office of the Secretary. The Region's boundaries were originally determined based on the number of state highway centerline miles in each region and are divided into the Northwest, North Central, Olympic, South Central, Southwest and Eastern Regions. With few

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I-11 exceptions, each Region manages the maintenance, operations, and construction activities within their geographical boundaries. c) Joint Operations Policy: Valuable coordination has resulted from numerous facilities where WSP and WSDOT have co-located operations. It is the policy for WSP and WSDOT to continue to leverage the advantages of co-locating including WSDOT Traffic Management Centers (TMC's) and WSP dispatch centers. Roles: Reviews of joint operations will be conducted annually. Action: WSDOT and WSP will continue to implement plans for joint operations centers where co-location has not yet occurred. 2. Data Sharing a) General Policy: It is the intent of the WSDOT and WSP to share information needed to facilitate joint operations of state highways. This information is envisioned to consist of things like: CAD access and user training Real time traffic flow, road, collision, and weather information Video from surveillance cameras Video road inventories, like SRView Speed Data Geo-spatial data, including Interchange Drawings Roles: WSP and WSDOT will create a standard for data sharing. Such as: Data content and formatting Data documentation and Meta-data Data collection and update methods and procedures Data accuracy Data update cycles Third party data Stewardship Information will be shared between agencies at the same cost as if the information were shared between programs within the agency. (Cost recovery data will be shared at the same rate). Memorandum of Understandings will be used to document the sharing of information, which would cover the items addressed in the standards.

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I-20 5. Commercial Vehicles a) Weigh Stations Policy: The WSP and WSDOT agree that there is a need for fixed and portable weighing sites throughout the state. These sites include Plug and Run sites as well as other locations without permanent in-ground scales. Roles: The role of the WSP is to identify where the portable weighing sites should be located and the role of the WSDOT is to prepare paved and level sites for conducting portable weighing events. b) Permitting and Weight Enforcement (include curfews) Policy: The WSDOT and the WSP recognize the need to move over-legal size loads as well as the need for a permitting process to regulate over-legal moves in order to provide for the safety of the motoring public, preserve the infrastructure and assist industry in completing their move. Roles: RCW 46.44.090 authorizes the Department of Transportation to issue permits, authorizing the permits to operate or move a vehicle of a size or weight exceeding the maximums specified by law. The Washington State Patrol is one of several agents appointed by WSDOT to assist in issuing oversize and overweight permits. The State Patrol is charged with responsibility of enforcement of oversize and overweight permit use. RCW 46.44 charges the WSP with enforcement of size and weight laws. Five permanent Port of Entry scales located on the interstate system are operational 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Forty-seven other permanent scales are located throughout the state and operated on an as-needed basis. Portable scales are utilized in locations without scales as well as scale by-pass routes. Action: WSP will also continue to work with DOT in selling permits at the Port of Entries. In collaborative manner we will work to streamline process through the use of technology and provide the best service possible to the trucking industry. The WSDOT and WSP also recognize the need to meet regularly, typically monthly, to review the relationship of administration and enforcement of the State's vehicle size and weight laws and rules. The WSDOT and the WSP jointly share in the preparation of the State's annual certification to FHWA, certifying that both state and federal law have been properly applied and enforced on the national highway system.

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I-21 c) Commercial Vehicle Safety Inspections Policy: Commercial vehicle safety inspections are required by the federal government. Also, a commercial vehicle examination (CVE) program conducted at WSF vehicle terminals, which supports both the safety and security of WSF is an integral and important part of the WSP vessel and terminal security program. Roles: The Washington State Patrol performs safety inspections on commercial vehicles traveling in the state. Inspections are conducted by WSP at three inspection buildings located at the Ridgefield, Bow Hill, and Cle Elum weigh stations. Level 1, 2 and 3 inspections are also performed in weigh station parking lots and safe, designated roadside areas throughout the state. Vehicles with severe violations may be placed out of service until repairs are made. Action: WSDOT will continue to advocate for use of its highway construction funding to build necessary commercial vehicle safety inspection facilities. d) CVISN / WIM Policy: It is the policy of the WSP, WSDOT, DOL and the Washington Trucking Associations (WTA) that the CVISN and WIM program will provide a framework for "architecture" that will enable government agencies, the motor carrier industry, and other parties engaged in CVO safety assurance and regulation to exchange information and conduct business transactions electronically. The goal of the CVISN program is to improve the safety and efficiency of commercial vehicle operations. The Washington State Patrol, Washington State Department of Transportation, the Department of Licensing and the Washington Trucking Associations are jointly participating in a program to increase safety and to protect the states' highway infrastructure and enhance the movement of freight by mobility of commercial motor vehicles. The program is entitled "CVISN" (Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks). Additionally, the agencies have installed weigh-in-motion (WIM) at each of these scale facilities in order to weigh trucks while they are traveling on the mainline freeway system. Together these programs are also designed to check credential and safety information on a commercial vehicle at freeway speeds. If the truck is safe and legal, it is permitted to stay on the mainline and bypass weigh stations. The Washington State Patrol is responsible for installation and maintenance of the weigh-in- motion scales at sixteen high traffic volume weigh station sites. Roles: The role of WSP will be to manage the weigh in motion systems and act as the end line user of the roadside screening systems. The role of DOL is to manage the electronic credentialing component of CVISN and the role of WSDOT is to manage the overall program and act as the system architect, selling of transponders, and database

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I-22 management. The role of the WTA, the private sector partner, is to market the overall CVISN/WIM program to the motor carrier industry. References: Weigh Station Memorandum of understanding (between WSP and WSDOT) and DIS Information Technology Feasibility Study. Action: The actions items for the 01-03 biennium are to deploy CVISN/WIM at three or four sites, Everett southbound, SeaTac north and southbound, and, if time and funds permit, Kelso southbound. 6. Joint Facilities Policy: WSDOT and WSP will work collaboratively to assure that joint support facilities needs are identified and met economically, service to the public is enhanced, environmental impact is minimized, and investment in support facilities (buildings and related sites) is maximized. WSDOT and WSP will provide integrated workplaces that meet joint agency strategic goals. Action: To support the vision stated above, the two agencies agree to: Coordinate Agency Capital Plans to facilitate new joint facilities development. Modify existing facilities to accommodate both agencies' missions. Exchange facilities where shifting operational requirements allow. Share vehicle fueling facilities. Outreach to other development partners that can help leverage lower cost / higher efficiency facilities, and Simplify inter-agency facilities agreements. Meet monthly to identify joint facility opportunities and develop facility security plans. 7. Wireless Communication Policy: The WSP and the WSDOT agree to support a shared vision to create a coordinated and integrated wireless transportation communications for the safe, effective, and efficient protection of the traveling public. The agencies mutually agree it is their joint goal to implement a statewide wireless mobile communications network that is fully interoperable between agencies and workgroups to provide needed services to our field forces and support groups to benefit the citizens of this State. The WSP and WSDOT provide public safety communications to many public safety organizations. These organizations include local, state, and federal public safety agencies whose missions encompass the protection of life and property. This joint vision is consistent with the development of a Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee (SIEC). In particular, the SIEC will be working for the sharing of resources to create the

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I-23 basis of an intergovernmental wireless public safety network. Resource may include, but not be limited to spectrum, facilities, equipment, staff, and systems. The WSP and the WSDOT agree to view their respective wireless communication systems as a single wireless system to plan for and foster interoperability among existing wireless networks and future wireless development that meets the requirements of local, state, and federal public safety. Roles: To support the vision as stated above, the two agencies agree to: Improve public safety wireless communications by addressing each of the five issue areas of interoperability coordination and partnerships, funding, spectrum, standards and technology, and security. Listen to, learn from, and collaborate with local and state public safety officials to improve communications interoperability. Encourage the implementation of interoperability by developing short-term action plans that support the long-term strategy of developing and sharing a statewide transportation wireless communication system. 8. Washington State Ferries Policy: The safety and security of passengers and crews onboard ferries and at the terminals leading to the ferries is a primary concern of both the WSDOT and WSP. The WSP is the law enforcement agency with primary responsibility for terminal traffic management on the designated state highways, vessel and terminal security, and emergent incident response for all criminal events such as assault, DUI, bomb threats or other acts of terrorism. In carrying out these roles, any of the possible activities listed in the table below may be used singularly or collectively in an effort to fulfill these responsibilities. Roles: The WSP will work cooperatively with the Washington State Ferries to ascertain the most appropriate and cost effective use of resources. The WSP has committed to perform the following functions at WSF terminals and onboard vessels:

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I-24 Activity Resources Particulars Terminal Dedicated Vessel and Direct/control vehicle/passenger traffic traffic control Terminal Security at various terminals typically focused and on scene (VATS) troopers. on high passenger/vehicle density presence locations. Random vessel Two trooper teams; at Onboard presence in general passenger boardings/ferry various times throughout spaces or located in pilothouse. Focus rides WSF's daily operating on high passenger density routes and period times. Random Existing and/or Consensual vehicle inspections vehicle supplemental Vessel and conducted on random intervals. Again, inspections at Terminal Security focus on high passenger density routes terminals (VATS) troopers and times. Commercial Dedicated CVE troopers Random vehicle searches focused on vehicle possessing vehicle commercial trucks at high volume enforcement inspection training/skills terminals and times. (CVE) exams Bomb dog Bomb dog teams from Random team sweeps at various WSF team sweeps East and West Puget terminals focused on high passenger Sound Districts and vehicle traffic Other visible Supplemental WSP At various locations (terminal and uniformed troopers vessel) dictated by WSP operational presence tempo Emergency Any combination of Response level and dedication of response resources list above resources is situational, depending upon the circumstances presented. 9. Transportation System Security Policy: WSP and WSDOT are committed to transportation system security and agency preparedness. Roles: WSP is responsible for transportation system security. Action: The WSP and the WSDOT jointly agree to develop a plan to enhance the security of the transportation system for the benefit of the traveling public and protection of the infrastructure. This plan will identify high cost/high consequence locations on the transportation system which warrant extra protection measures. This plan will include, but not limited to, (1) periodic routine patrols by WSP, (2) thorough WSP enforcement of signed no parking-tow zones, (3) increased monitoring of traffic cameras by WSDOT, and (4) scheduled random drive-by inspections of key transportation facilities by WSDOT maintenance employees. The plan will address threat levels and a joint

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I-25 escalating response commensurate with the threat level. Lead participants are Terry Simmonds (WSDOT) and Dave Karnitz (WSP). WSF, U.S. Coast Guard, and WSP will be charter members of the WSF Security Committee aimed at assuring the secure operations of WSF during normal and heightened states of terrorist/criminal threats. 10. Safety Rest Areas Policy: It is our intent that the WSDOT and the WSP will work together to ensure that operations of the Safety Rest Areas are conducted to maximize the public health, safety, and enjoyment of these very popular sites. Roles: WSDOT has responsibility for operations and maintenance of Safety Rest Areas and WSP has responsibility for enforcement of laws and regulations. Actions: Safety Rest Area maintenance and operations will be an agenda topic at each annual joint meeting to determine if any operational or enforcement emphasis areas are necessary to benefit the users of the Safety Rest Areas. 11. Policy Performance Measures WSDOT and WSP will coordinate the development of performance measurements that involve activities reported on by both agencies before submittal to OFM and the Legislature. Both agencies will work collaboratively to develop joint measures for incident response and clearance times. 12. Policy training Each agency commits to provide resources and expertise to share this policy internally and with key constituencies. 13. Policy Update Process This policy will be reviewed annually at the WSP/WSDOT joint meeting. In advance of that meeting, each agency will survey internally to identify accomplishments that will be reported at the annual meeting. 14. Appendices a) Key Personnel Contacts b) Tables of Organization

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I-26 APPENDIX A Key Personnel Contacts WSDOT (Washington State Department of Transportation) Headquarters John Conrad, Assistant Secretary, Engineering & Regional Operations, Olympia (360-705-7032) Brian Ziegler, Director of Maintenance and Operations, Olympia (360-705-7801) Ken Kirkland, State Maintenance Engineer, Olympia (360-705-7851) Fred DeBolt, Equipment and Facilities Administrator (360-705-7880) Toby Rickman, State Traffic Engineer, Olympia (360-705-7280) Jim Shanafelt, Assistant State Traffic Engineer, Olympia (360-705-7282) Northwest Region Lorena Eng, Regional Administrator, Seattle (206-440-4762) Tom Lentz, Maintenance Engineer, Seattle (206-440-4656) Dave McCormick, Traffic Engineer, Seattle (206-440-4487) North Central Region Don Senn, Regional Administrator, Wenatchee (509-667-3001) Bob Stowe, Maintenance Engineer, Wenatchee (509-667-3065) Jennene Ring, Traffic Engineer, Wenatchee (509-667-3080) Olympic Region Randy Hain, Regional Administrator, Tumwater (360-357-2658) Jerry Walter, Maintenance Engineer, Tumwater (360-357-2619) John Nisbet, Traffic Engineer, Tumwater (360-357-2670) Southwest Region Don Wagner, Regional Administrator, Vancouver (360-905-2001) Rick Sjolander, Maintenance Engineer, Vancouver (360-905-2020) Chris Christopher, Traffic Engineer, Vancouver (360-905-2240) South Central Region Don Whitehouse, Regional Administrator, Yakima (509-577-1620) Casey McGill, Maintenance Engineer, Yakima (509-577-1901) Rick Gifford, Traffic Engineer, Union Gap (509-577-1985) Eastern Region J.C. Lenzi, Regional Administrator, Spokane (509-324-6010) Larry Chatterton, Maintenance Engineer, Spokane (509-324-6538) Ted Trepanier, Traffic Engineer, Spokane (509-324-6550)

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I-27 WSP (Washington State Patrol) Headquarters Deputy Chief Lowell Porter, Field Operations Bureau (360-586-2340) Deputy Chief Steve Jewell, Investigative Services Bureau (360-753-1770) Deputy Chief Maurice King, Technical Services Bureau (360-753-4632) Director Diane Perry, Management Services Bureau (360-753-5141) Captain Fred Fakkema, Commercial Vehicle Division (360-753-0302) Mr. Marty Knorr, Communications Division (360-438-5862) Mr. Tom Neff, Property Management Division (360-570-9820) District 1 Captain Dan Eikum, Tacoma (253-536-4301) District 2 Captain Les Young, Bellevue (425-649-4650) District 3 Captain Dave Karnitz, Yakima (509-249-6701) District 4 Captain Mike Dubee, Spokane (509-456-3061) District 5 Captain Carrie Greene, Vancouver (360-449-7901) District 6 Captain Bill Larson, Wenatchee (509-665-4006) District 7 Captain Bob Lenz, Marysville (360-651-6336) District 8 Captain Gail Otto, Bremerton (360-405-6601)

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I-28 APPENDIX B Tables of Organization

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WASHINGTON STATE PATROL ORGANIZATIONAL CHART JANUARY 2002 CHIEF Department Government and Labor and Risk Psychologist Media Relations Management Field Operations Fire Protection Forensic Laboratory Investigative Services Management Services Technical Services Bureau Bureau Services Bureau Bureau Bureau Bureau Emergency Crime Laboratory Commercial Vehicle Budget and Fiscal Communications Tacoma D-1 Mobilization Division Division Services Division Fire Code & Info. Investigative Human Resource Criminal Records Seattle D-2 Kelso Services Assistance Division Division Division Office of Professional Property Management Information Yakima D-3 Fire Services Training Kennewick Standards Division Technology Division Regional Fire Services Traffic Investigation Training Division Spokane D-4 Marysville Division Vancouver D-5 Seattle Wenatchee D-6 Spokane Marysville D-7 Tacoma Toxicology Laboratory Bremerton D-8 Division Administrative Implied Consent Division An internationally accredited agency providing professional law enforcement services

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Citizens of Washington State Washington State Department of Transportation Governor Gary Locke Douglas B. MacDonald Date Washington State Transportation Commission Christopher Marr, Chair Ed Barnes Elmira Forner A. Michle Maher Aubrey Davis George Kargianis Connie Niva Secretary ----------------------------------------------- ---- D. MacDonald Attorney General S. Reinmuth, AAG Audit Office W. Donaldson Chief of Staff P. Hammond Equal Opportunity Office B. Richardson Engineering and Northwest Washington Administration Washington State Ferries Regional Operations J. Okamoto and Support M. Thorne J. Conrad H. Morgenstern Highways and Communications L. Mullen Local Programs K. Davis (Acting) Eastern Environmental & Planning Deputy Public Finance Region Engr. Programs and Policy Director Affairs Governmental Public Trans. J. Lenzi D. Nelson ------ C. Howard P. Patterson (Acting) A. Arnis T. McCarthy Liaison and Rail D. Griffith J. Slakey North Central Maint. & Ops. Northwest Org. Strategy Terminal Budget Region Programs ------ Region and HR Engineering B. Ford Ombudsman Aviation D. Senn B. Ziegler L. Eng G. Baldwin R. East A. Briggs J. Sibold South Central Planning & Cap. Olympic Vessel Human Region Prog. Mgmt. - - - - - - Region Operations Engineering Resources D. Whitehouse R. Smith R. Hain J. Nortz L. Zuidweg Tribal Liaison TEP Vacant C. Jollie J. Ellis Southwest Urban Information Information Maintenance Region Corridors Technology Technology Freight M. Nitchman D. Wagner D. Dye J. Long B. OBrien Strategy & Policy J. Doyle --- --- ----------------------- ----------------------- Board Accounting Pilotage Comm. M. Yates I-405 SR 520 Viaduct H. Dudley Team Team Team Administrative M. Bowman I-90 Tacoma Narrows SR 167 Sound Risk Team Team Team Transit Management W. Henselman - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - To be developed - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -