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Coordination Process: In 1994, several human service agencies recognized there was no transportation available for individuals who were not eligible for county services. The Huron County Health Department, Huron County Job and Family Services, Huron County Senior Center, MRDD Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation, and the vocational school worked together and received a grant from the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) in 1998. The county commissioners were the grantee and the Huron County Senior Center served as the lead agency. During the first 2 years, coordination was only within Huron County. In 2000, intercounty coordination began as a result of the unmet need for transportation to and from employment. Because of a large number of service jobs in Erie County, people needed to travel from Huron to Erie County. Coordination with Erie began. There were not enough vehicles for the new route to connect with Sandusky Transit so additional funding was sought. This effort was supported by the inclusion of transportation questions in a needs assessment being conducted by the Huron County Health Department. The results of the survey indicated a needs assessment for transportation. The result was that a county commissioner supported the establishment of a demonstration project to purchase vehicles. Next, county commissioners established a county transit board. The board facilitated a decision to submit an application for rural transportation funding from ODOT. Current plans call for pursuit of this grant for 2003. In addition to new rural transportation service, coordination effort will continue to meet the needs that the new rural transportation service cannot meet, such as prioritizing transportation needs of those with nonemergency medical treatment. Huron County is collaborating with Sandusky County to develop the capability to use Sandusky's computer dispatching and scheduling system with a single call center in Sandusky County. Three or four providers would access the system via an Internet connection, with scheduling done at the call center. Benefits of Coordination: The biggest success has been coordinating services between the two transit systems that operate in the U.S. 250 corridor. This coordination provides a transfer from Huron County Transit to Sandusky Transit in Erie County. It also provides a link to Lorain County. Other counties are now contacting them and trying to coordinate services. Another success has been providing transportation to and from work, which accounts for 60 percent to 75 percent of the trips. Other benefits of coordinating service are vehicle sharing, which reduces trip duplication and in turn reduces costs. Transportation service to more areas and more trips overall have resulted. The number of trips over the past 2 years has significantly increased (see Figure 2). Figure 2 Huron County Transit's Ridership Increase 16000 14754 14000 12000 10000 10497 8000 6000 4000 2000 2403 0 1999 2000 2001 Trips 238 Casebook of State and Local Coordination Models SECTION IV

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Support, Problems, Barriers, Mistakes, Solutions: From the start, elected officials have been involved, providing letters of support to accompany grant applications for financial support for local matching funds. Continuing support is maintained by inviting them to meetings and sending out a newsletter. Huron Transit has also received a great deal of support from ODOT, including funding, guidance, and advice. The greatest barrier has been trying to work with uncooperative people. The various reasons that agencies and potential riders do not want to cooperate include fear that they will lose funding, not wanting to try something new, and not wanting to give up their own vehicles. Recommendations for Others: Huron County Transit staff offered these suggestions: It is good to learn from others, but remember that every county and every system is different. What works in one location may not work everywhere; Identify the unmet needs and determine what will work best for your community; Realize as coordination begins, everyone may agree there is a need for transportation, but may differ on how to meet that need; Be patient, it will take time to work together and make compromises; and Work with individuals and agencies committed to the project and realize it is not always possible to win everyone over. Chapter 8 Successful, Insightful, Coordinated Transportation Services in Rural Communities 239

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BAY COUNTY, MICHIGAN: TRANSIT SYSTEM BROKERAGE Program Bay METRO Sponsoring Organization MDOT and Consolidation Transportation Program City, State Bay City, MI Service Type Demand response, fixed route, curb to curb Service Area Bay County, MI Service Area Population 110,000 Service Area Size (sq mi) 477 Data for Year Ending 2001 One-way Trips per Year 655,546 Annual Expenses $5,600,000 Cost/Trip $8.54 Major Funding Sources Property tax levy Coordinating Agencies "Almost all human services agencies in the community" (YMCA, social services, preschools, area agencies on aging, Head Start), recently Arenac County Background: Bay METRO provides fixed-route and curb-to-curb service throughout Bay County. It has contracts with almost all human service agencies in the community, such as YMCA, Social Services, preschool programs, Area Agency on Aging, and Head Start. The system emerged in the 1970s and, since its beginning, has been responsible for transportation coordination in the community. Every agency that had a vehicle was encouraged to coordinate with Bay METRO. Bay METRO transports persons with disabilities, seniors, children in after school programs and in local programs for at-risk children, and others. The Board of Directors governs the system. The board hires the general manager who manages day-to-day operations. Bay County, Michigan, has an area of 477 square miles and a population of 110,000 persons. The principal city--Bay City--has a population of just under 40,000; the urbanized area has a population of about 75,000. Transportation system characteristics are outlined below: Number of vehicles: 47 buses (6 large, 7 medium, 34 small), 1 trolley, and 12 lift vans; Annual transportation budget: FY2002 operating budget is $5,600,000; Other services provided in addition to transportation: none; Number of employees: 110 full time, 10 part time; Number of passengers: 655,546 in FY2001; Cost per passenger: $5,600,000/655,546 = $8.54. This is an average cost; this cost is higher for demand-responsive service and lower for fixed-route service. Service hours are from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday. Private carriers are contracted for after-hours service. Reimbursement is done using price per trip fare, which is $3.91 per trip from Bay METRO and $1 for each passenger traveling in the urbanized areas. For after-hours carriers, Bay METRO purchases vehicles, maintains them, and trains drivers. Although drivers are responsible for buying liability insurance, Bay METRO has an umbrella insurance policy that covers private carriers. 240 Casebook of State and Local Coordination Models SECTION IV

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Contracts are in place with all previously mentioned agencies, as well as with school districts, community action programs, and county commissioners in other counties in order to provide non-stop multi-county transportation for people going to a hospital in another county. Coordination Process: Coordination efforts started with the MDOT Coordination and Consolidation Transportation Program more than 20 years ago. Now Bay METRO has a property tax levy of 75 cents on every $100,000 net worth. That levy generates $1.6 million a year, 30 percent of that provides Bay METRO's total budget. Bay METRO has just started to coordinate transportation services in neighboring Arenac County with 15,000 people. Arenac County did not have transportation services until Bay METRO provided its services. The request to do so came from Michigan DOT. All operational work is subcontracted, however, Bay METRO is doing scheduling and administration. Data are not currently available to document the need for coordination because of the long period of time over which coordinated services developed. However, there is strong recognition that there certainly had been an unmet need for the transportation services in the community before. Bay METRO has strong political support from people of the community. During the last tax levy renewal in August 2000, it had experienced better than expected voting results from the surrounding communities. The transit authority is focused on providing services that are needed by the people. County and city officials work together with Bay METRO to improve services and better coordinate transportation. Local businesses are also very supportive, because Bay METRO transports people to them. Bay METRO is governed by a board of directors, which has nine members approved by county commissioners. The Specialized Service Committee, which consists of representatives from the participating agencies (about 20 to 50 members), is the driving force behind the transportation coordination. It meets monthly. To get the service functioning, interlocal agreements with other counties were executed so that some groups of passengers do not have to transfer when crossing county borders. Agreements were developed with school districts, community action programs, all subcontractors, all participating agencies, and county commissioners of other counties. Schedules, bus stops, and transfer points were created in the 1970s. Benefits of Coordination: All the usual benefits of transportation coordination apply to Bay METRO: Access to more funding; Lower trip costs for riders; Lower trip costs for agencies; Provision of transportation in areas formerly without transportation service; Overall increase in the number of trips provided; Reduced vehicle travel and less duplication of services; Greater productivity, more riders per vehicle; Better access to jobs, health care, and shopping; Increased activity for local businesses, and Enhanced image and visibility for transit. Support, Problems, Barriers, Mistakes, Solutions: Problems with coordination: "Funding is not a problem for us. We are very forgiving: we say you have to work with us and we will provide you with our service. If you are looking for reasons not to coordinate, there's always something that stops you from doing it. But if you determined to do it, nothing is a problem. Working with a community, you provide services that are needed." Chapter 8 Successful, Insightful, Coordinated Transportation Services in Rural Communities 241

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State support: "The State has been helpful, for the most part. Again, you just have to work with them, help them and do not embarrass them. They have asked us to manage transportation services in the county to the north of us (Arenac County), they know we have good practices and they trust us." Additional help: "It would be helpful if people knew what they need and what they are ready to contribute. Some agencies do not have a very clear understanding of that they need and what it takes to accomplish it." People involved with the Bay County System also noted that Coordination is seen as a lot of work, which some people would like to avoid. Transit managers are seen as the worst enemies of change: most of them do not want to be bothered with new ideas. Satisfaction with service is high. A recent rider survey indicates this: METRO's service is rated as excellent by 54 percent of its riders. Another comment is one testimony to Bay METRO's formula for success: "We are expected to be everything to everybody and often we are, people have very high expectations for our services. Local groups and agencies have changed the way they do business depending on how we are able to provide the service. They would come to us and say "We need service, how does it work into your schedule?" We often try to tell groups and agencies not to set up any programs before they talk to us. We may not be able to accommodate their transportation needs, however, if we work together we should be able to work something out." Recommendations for Others: Know the need of the community, and tailor your services accordingly. The services you provide at the moment may not be the services the community wants. 242 Casebook of State and Local Coordination Models SECTION IV

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NORTHWEST MONTANA: BLACKFEET TRANSIT Program Blackfeet Transit Sponsoring Organization Blackfeet Reservation City, State Browning, MT Service Type Dial-a-ride transit service Service Area Blackfeet Reservation and City of Browning, including most of Glacier County, which is largely unpopulated and stretches north to Canada. Service Area Population 1,065 (year 2000) Service Area Size (sq mi) 2,343 Data for Year Ending 2002 One-way Trips per Year 23,000 Annual Expenses $155,000 (rough estimate) Cost/Trip $7.65 first quarter of 2003; $5.04 second quarter of 2003 Major Funding Sources FTA 5311 (50%) and self-funded (50%) Coordinating Agencies MDT for FTA funding coordination, organizations located in Browning and the Blackfeet Reservation, including Indian Health Services, the community college, community health representatives, nursing homes, and markets. Background: Blackfeet Transit in Northwest Montana has been providing transportation service since 1978. It is a growing program serving the Blackfeet Reservation and Browning. The Reservation is approximately 1.5 million acres and includes most of Glacier County, which is largely unpopulated and stretches north to the Canadian border. The Blackfeet Tribe consists of 14,700 enrolled members, approximately 9,000 of which live on the reservation. Browning, located just east of Glacier National Park (a popular tourist destination), and within the Blackfeet Indian Reservation at the junction of U.S. Highway 2 and State Highway 89, is the largest city in the county and is the headquarters for the Blackfeet Indian Tribal Government and the hub of tribal activity. Browning's population was 1,065 in 2000, a 9-percent decline from 1990. Approximately 16 percent of the population of the reservation and Browning combined is non- Indian. Other communities in the Blackfeet Reservation include Starr School, Blackfoot, East Glacier, St. Mary, Babb, Kiowa, Boarding School, Seville, and Heart Butte. Blackfeet Transit provides more than 23,000 one-way, dial-a-ride trips a year to people within Browning and the outlying Blackfeet Reservation area combined. Blackfeet Transit serves anyone in need of a ride within the service area, including persons with disabilities, those going to medical appointments, senior citizens, people transitioning from welfare to work, and students. The program prides itself on being inclusive and available to anyone, regardless of whether they are a tribal member, have special needs, or any other factor. The community has become familiar with Blackfeet Transit primarily through word-of-mouth referrals. A dispatcher is on call for 8 hours, scheduling dial-a-ride service at least a day in advance. Service is available Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. At this time, dial-a-ride is the only type of service being offered; a fixed-route system with bus stops was originally envisioned but later considered to be too expensive and a lower budget priority. The program operates one 7-passenger van, two 12-passenger buses with wheel chair lifts, and one 18-passenger bus also with a wheel chair lift. These vehicles are operated 5 days a week, except for one of the two passenger buses that is used less frequently. Chapter 8 Successful, Insightful, Coordinated Transportation Services in Rural Communities 243

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Blackfeet Transit has been growing since its inception in 1978, in terms of ridership and funding levels. As program staff found methods to raise awareness of the availability of transit service, ridership increased. With the increased ridership, Blackfeet Transit was able to secure additional funding and more vehicles. But staff say that resources are still not enough to meet estimated demand. The budget has increased by an estimated $69,000 over the past 14 years. Blackfeet Transit functions completely as a demand-response program, but given the program's growth, different routing and organizational structures are being explored. Expansion to serve the entire 40-mile reservation is also envisioned. Organization and Funding: The Blackfeet Indian Tribal Government is the public agency that operates Blackfeet Transit. A transportation advisory committee (TAC) assists program staff with management and decision-making. The TAC consists of tribal members and representatives of tribal organizations with a transportation interest or skill, such as the tribal planning department. Five staff people currently operate Blackfeet Transit: one supervisor, one dispatcher, two full-time drivers, and one 9-month driver. Working with the TAC, the Blackfeet Transit program is mainly self-governed and has seen little need for formal partnerships with outside agencies. The exception to this is the relationship that Blackfeet Transit maintains with the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT), which enables the tribe to receive Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5311 funds. Section 5311 funds provide one-half of the program's resources, while the other half is provided directly by the tribe. MDT pays for 80 percent of the tribe's vehicles, while 20 percent of vehicle funding comes from the tribe. Blackfeet Transit does not receive any funding from the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The FY2003 operating budget was approximately $155,000. Coordination at Blackfeet Transit: As mentioned, Blackfeet Transit coordinates with MDT to receive funding and comply with applicable regulations. Yet, the primary focus of Blackfeet Transit coordination is with (Indian and non-Indian) individuals and organizations in the Blackfeet Reservation and Browning. These organizations include, but are not limited to, community health representatives, nursing homes, the program for the deaf and persons with disabilities, the welfare office, Blackfeet Community College, IGA supermarket, the Indian Health Services hospital, the tribal office, shelters, and law enforcement officials. The advisory governing body, or TAC, consists of representatives from tribal organizations, including the above businesses and agencies. TAC members were selected for their transportation expertise, interest in Blackfeet Transit's mission, and/or affiliation with people who have specialized transportation needs. While Blackfeet Transit actively promotes its service to end users, coordination among agencies predominantly occurs when an organization seeking to assist its constituents approaches Blackfeet Transit, rather than through efforts by Blackfeet Transit to form alliances with organizations. Blackfeet Transit does not formally contract with these organizations. Rather, informal coordination practices are in place with an emphasis on the service delivery and quality. Dial-a-ride service is scheduled by the individual who contacts Blackfeet Transit, as well as by certain organizations, such as senior centers, on behalf of their clients. Blackfeet Transit contracts with a nearby garage because it does not have its own maintenance facility. This is the extent of current outsourcing but as the program grows it may need to work with more contractors or form operational partnerships. Benefits of Coordination: Increasing demand, ridership, and associated resources are the most substantial successes of coordinated service. By offering service in response to and coordination with the Indian and non-Indian organizations in Browning and the outer areas of the reservation, the number of locations and riders has expanded. More vehicles have been obtained, enabling faster and more frequent service. Blackfeet Transit has been able to achieve these increases through perseverance. Staff have consistently tried a range of promotions to end users to expand awareness and use of public transportation offerings. A related benefit is the community-wide knowledge of Blackfeet Transit's availability. Blackfeet Transit is the only public transit service in the Browning area that individuals and organizations can contact directly or refer people to for rides. Initially, people thought that Blackfeet Transit was just for elderly people, but staff have succeeded in educating people that it is for everyone. Challenges and Lessons Learned: Having been in operation for almost 26 years now, the core advice that Blackfeet Transit's supervisor would offer other tribal programs is to keep trying different tactics if one does 244 Casebook of State and Local Coordination Models SECTION IV

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not work. For example, if ridership is low, then try a different promotional approach. Over time, people will become aware and ride. Now, ridership is growing so fast that the existing management framework is being challenged, and new organizational structures are being explored. As a small program, Blackfeet Transit has found it most efficient for the tribe to operate the program in coordination with the TAC and community it serves, rather than in partnership with another governing body. As the program grows, organizational and operational changes may require new types of coordination. Chapter 8 Successful, Insightful, Coordinated Transportation Services in Rural Communities 245

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ROSEAU COUNTY, MINNESOTA: SMALL-SCALE AGENCY COORDINATION Program Roseau County Transit Sponsoring Organization Roseau County Transit City, State Roseau, MN Service Type Flexible fixed-route service and dial-a-ride service with 24 hours advance scheduling Service Area Roseau County, MN Service Area Population 16,000 Service Area Size (sq mi) 1,663 Data for Year Ending 2000 One-way Trips per Year 17,185 Annual Expenses $123,307 Cost/Trip $7.18 Major Funding Sources Federal (Section 5311 rural transportation funding); Minnesota Department of Transportation; Roseau County Coordinating Agencies Social Services; County Commissioners; Roseau County Committee on Aging; Occupational Development Center; Focus Corporation; Rehabilitation Service Office; Head Start; a nursing home Background: Roseau County is a very rural county located in northeastern Minnesota on the Canadian border. Roseau County has a population of 16,000 and a land area of 1,663 square miles. The county has five towns, and each has a population less than 2,500 persons. Roseau County Transit provides flexible, fixed-route service and dial-a-ride service with 24 hours advance scheduling. The Roseau County Committee on Aging took the initiative to organize transportation service and is the operating agency for delivery of service. A flexible fixed-route bus usually deviates only 1 mile from the route, but it can deviate sometimes several miles. Fixed-route service runs only two times a day: in the morning and in the afternoon. Roseau County Transit operates two vehicles, both wheelchair accessible with a capacity for 16 passengers and two wheelchairs. Staff includes one full-time manager, a part-time, assistant dispatcher, and nine part- time drivers. Roseau County Transit bills participating agencies $25 per hour for transportation service. Roseau County Transit's operating budget in the year 2000 was $123,307. In 2000, Roseau County Transit provided 95,179 vehicle miles of transportation service, providing 17,185 rides. Service is available weekdays between 7:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Roseau County Transit provides transportation for social services, including the Occupational Development Center, Focus Corporation, Head Start, and a nursing home. Head Start has its own vehicle, but they cannot accommodate all their trips with one vehicle, especially during the day. Coordination Process: In 1990, the Northwestern Regional Development Commission conducted a survey among residents of Roseau County and found out that there was a strong need for transportation. No coordinated transportation services were available at that time. The Roseau County Committee on Aging decided to step forward and organized an advisory committee to deal with public transportation. The 246 Casebook of State and Local Coordination Models SECTION IV

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Advisory Committee included the Occupation Development Center, Social Services, county commissioners, Focus Corporation, and the Rehabilitation Service Office. The Advisory Committee decided that getting a vehicle was most important and subsequently received a vehicle from the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) through the Section 5310 Specialized Transportation Program. Being without operating funds, the Roseau County Committee on Aging relied on volunteer labor and organized fundraising campaigns to cover costs. Two years later, Roseau Transit ran out of operating funds and requested emergency funds from MnDOT. The result was that MnDOT worked with Roseau County to establish Section 5311 rural transportation funding. In 1993, the original vehicle was sold to Head Start and a new vehicle was purchased with Section 5311 funding. In 1997, another vehicle was purchased. In 1999, Roseau County Commissioners decided to cover 35 percent of the operating budget. Before that, Roseau County Transit received fixed allocations from participating cities and the county, which were generally not sufficient. After accounting for farebox revenues, MnDOT provides the remaining 65 percent. This change resulted from an evaluation initiated by the Roseau County Committee on Aging that resulted in the recommendation adopted by the cities and county. The evaluation and recommendation focused on the value of public transportation to the county. Benefits of Coordination: Roseau County Transit recognizes the following benefits of coordination: access to more funding; filling gaps where there was no service; better access to jobs, health care, and shopping; increased activity to local businesses; and enhanced visibility and image of transit. Their biggest success has been bringing local agencies together to achieve better access to funding. Support, Problems, Barriers, Mistakes, Solutions: The major problem has been the turnover of staff. This is due in part to the nature of volunteer service. Additionally, talking to agencies and bringing them together sometimes is a problem. Roseau County Transit feels it has been successful, but it requires continuing attention. MnDOT has been supportive in communication with local governments. It took local governments a period of time to recognize the role that transportation plays in a community. MnDOT provides annual assistance with contracts and agreements and provides education and training about new programs and opportunities available. Greater coordination could be achieved by coordinating with neighboring counties. Recommendations for Others: "Do not get discouraged. Coordination is really beneficial, especially when you see passengers riding the bus." Chapter 8 Successful, Insightful, Coordinated Transportation Services in Rural Communities 247

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OTTAWA COUNTY, OHIO: GROWING FROM AGENCY TO PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Program Ottawa County Transit Agency (OCTA) Sponsoring Organization Ottawa County Transit Board City, State Port Clinton, OH Service Type Curb to curb Service Area Ottawa County and trips to Erie, Wood, Sandusky, Huron, Lucas, and Seneca counties Service Area Population 40,000 Service Area Size (sq mi) 253 Data for Year Ending 2001 One-way Trips per Year 46,000 Annual Expenses $613,736 Cost/Trip $21.15 Major Funding Sources Ottawa County Board of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities (MRDD), ODOT, FTA, Ottawa County Commissioners, agency contracts, fares Coordinating Agencies County MRDD Board, Department of Job and Family Services, Salvation Army, United Way, Goodwill, retirement communities, nursing homes, school, area agencies on aging, Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation Other Annual trips are those within the county. Background: Ottawa County, located on the northern border of Ohio and southern border of Lake Erie, covers 253 square miles. Ottawa County has a population of approximately 40,000 residents. It is described as having a "small town feel," but it is also "home to a vast network of businesses, industries, and institutions that are leading the world in technology, development and investment." Despite many public highways, rail service, nearby airports, and even water transportation, public transportation services have only been available since 2000. The Ottawa County Transit Agency (OCTA) provides curb-to-curb transportation service within the county and to six nearby counties (Erie, Wood, Sandusky, Huron, Lucas, and Seneca). OCTA is governed by the Ottawa County Transit Board and coordinates transportation efforts among the County MRDD Board, Department of Job and Family Services, Salvation Army, United Way, retirement communities, nursing homes, schools, Goodwill, area agencies on aging, and Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation. OCTA is funded through the Ottawa County Board of MRDD, Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT), Federal Transit Administration (FTA), Ottawa County Commissioners, agency contracts, and passenger fares. Coordination Process: The need for public transportation had been discussed for 25 years, but it was not until 1992, when the Ottawa County Board of MRDD had the idea to extend their existing service to the public, that coordination began. At that time, MRDD was really the only agency that provided countywide transportation services. Other agencies transported clients in their own cars when transportation was needed. In 1994, MRDD decided to investigate grants and funding opportunities to develop a coordinated 248 Casebook of State and Local Coordination Models SECTION IV

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Plan For Coordinated Transportation Services In (YOUR) County Prepared for the (YOUR) County Transportation Steering Committee By H-2 Appendix H

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Table of Contents Executive Summary Plan for Coordinated Transportation Services in (YOUR) County A. INTRODUCTION B. NATURE AND SIZE OF THE MARKET FOR TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 1. Assessment of the Need for Transportation Services 2. Existing Providers of Transportation Services C. THE FOCUS OF TRANSPORTATION SERVICE COORDINATION 1. Strengths and Weaknesses of Transportation Services 2. Opportunities for and Threats to Transportation Services 3. Key Visions of Success 4. Key Considerations in Coordinating Transportation Services 5. Expectations of Transportation Coordination 6. Organization and Delivery of Coordinated Transportation Services D. VISION OF SUCCESS, MISSION, AND GOALS FOR TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION 1. Vision of Success 2. Mission 3. Goals E. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND MANAGEMENT 1. Organizational Structure 2. Management and Administration 3. InterOrganizational Relationships F. SERVICE DEVELOPMENT, DELIVERY, AND PRICING 1. Types of Services Offered 2. Service Operation and Performance Standards 3. Methods for Delivering Services 4. Purchasers of Transportation Services 5. Customers of Transportation Services 6. Cost and Pricing of Transportation Services 7. On-Going Development of New Transportation Services G. CAPITAL FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT 1. Available Vehicles 2. Projected Vehicle Requirements 3. Non-Vehicle Requirements 4. Facilities H. ANNUAL AND PROJECTED OPERATING BUDGET I. ANNUAL AND PROJECTED CAPITAL BUDGET J. MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS PROGRAM K. PROGRAM PERFORMANCE, REVIEW, AND REPORTING Appendix H H-3

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List of Tables Page 1. Mobility and Self-Care Limitations/Persons Aged 16 Years and Older (Your City and County) 2. Persons Aged 16 Years and Older with Mobility and SelfCare Limitations (Your City and County) 3. Persons in Selected Age Groups (Your City and County) 4. Family Income in (Your City and County) 5. Ratio of 1989 Income to Poverty Level/Persons for whom Poverty Status is Determined (Your City and County) H-4 Appendix H

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List of Figures Page 1. Potential Customers of a Coordinated Transportation System 2. Travel Needs 3A. Transportation Service Needs in (Your) County 3B. Groups with Special Transportation Service Needs 4. Geographic Area of Transportation Services Provided 5. Ways in Which Transportation Providers Limit Trips 6. How Transportation Services are Provided 7. Types of Services Offered 8. Size of Vehicle Fleet 9A. Replacement Status of Agency Vehicles 9B. Number of Vehicles that Need to be Replaced 10. Key Components of Organization and Leadership 11. Key Features of Management and Operation 12. Potential Sources of Leadership 13. Key Coordination Questions 14. Areas of Potential Interest in Coordination Appendix H H-5

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EXAMPLE OF STATE LEGISLATION CREATING STATEWIDE COORDINATING COUNCIL Appendix A E Appendix Appendix I I This appendix provides information that should be generally useful in setting up coordination activities at a statewide level. Feel free to make changes to this appendix to better meet the needs and desires in your own state. Appendix I I-1

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[ Section / Chapter __________ ] COORDINATING SPECIAL NEEDS TRANSPORTATION SECTIONS Finding--Intent Definitions. Program for Agency Coordinated Transportation. Agency council on coordinated transportation--Creation, membership, staff. Council--Duties (as amended by 1999 c 372). Local planning forums. Council--Termination. Repealer. Finding--Intent. (Effective until ___________) The legislature finds that transportation systems for persons with special needs are not operated as efficiently as possible. In some cases, programs established by the legislature to assist persons with special needs can not be accessed due to these inefficiencies and coordination barriers. It is the intent of the legislature that public transportation agencies, pupil transportation programs, private nonprofit transportation providers, and other public agencies sponsoring programs that require transportation services coordinate those transportation services. Through coordination of transportation services, programs will achieve increased efficiencies and will be able to provide more rides to a greater number of persons with special needs. Definitions. (Effective until _________.) The definitions in this section apply throughout this chapter. (1) "Persons with special transportation needs" means those persons, including their personal attendants, who because of physical or mental disability, income status, or age are unable to transport themselves or purchase transportation. (2) "Special needs coordinated transportation" is transportation for persons with special transportation needs that is developed through a collaborative community process involving transportation providers; human service programs and agencies; consumers; social, educational, and health service providers; employer and business representatives; employees and employee representatives; and other affected parties. I-2 Appendix I

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Program for Agency Coordinated Transportation (Effective until __________.) In order to increase efficiency, to reduce waste and duplication, to enable people to access social and health services, to provide a basic level of mobility, and to extend and improve transportation services to people with special transportation needs, the state shall implement the Program for Agency Coordinated Transportation. The program will improve transportation efficiency and effectiveness to maximize the use of community resources so that more people can be served within available funding levels. The Program for Agency Coordinated Transportation will facilitate a state-wide approach to coordination and will support the development of community-based coordinated transportation systems that exhibit the following characteristics: (1) Organizations serving persons with special transportation needs share responsibility for ensuring that customers can access services. (2) There is a single entry process for customers to use to have trips arranged and scheduled, so the customer does not have to contact different locations based on which sponsoring agency or program is paying for the trip. (3) A process is in place so that when decisions are made by service organizations on facility siting or program policy implementation, the costs of client transportation and the potential effects on the client transportation costs of other agencies or programs are considered Affected agencies are given an opportunity to influence the decision if the potential impact is negative. (4) Open local market mechanisms give all providers who meet minimum standards an opportunity to participate in the program, and, in addition, allow for cost comparisons so that purchasers can select the least expensive trip most appropriate to the customer's needs. (5) There is flexibility in using the available vehicles in a community so that the ability to transport people is not restricted by categorical claims to vehicles. (6) There is maximum sharing of operating facilities and administrative services, to avoid duplication of costly program elements. (7) Trip sponsors and service providers have agreed on a process for allocating costs and billing when they share use of vehicles. Appendix I I-3

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(8) Minimum standards exist for at least safety, driver training, maintenance, vehicles, and technology to eliminate barriers that may prevent sponsors from using each other's vehicles or serving each other's clients. (9) The system is user friendly. The fact that the system is supported by a multitude of programs and agencies with different eligibility, contracting, service delivery, payment, and funding structures does not negatively affect the customer's ability to access service. (10) Support is provided for research, technology improvements, and sharing of best practices from other communities, so that the system can be continually improved. (11) There are performance goals and an evaluation process that leads to continuous system improvement. Agency council on coordinated transportation--Creation, membership, staff. (Effective until __________.) (1) The agency council on coordinated transportation is created. The council is composed of nine voting members and eight nonvoting, legislative members. (2) The nine voting members are the superintendent of public instruction or a designee, the secretary of transportation or a designee, the secretary of the department of social and health services or a designee, and six members appointed by the governor as follows: (a) One representative from the office of the governor; (b) Two persons who are consumers of special needs transportation services; (c) One representative from the Washington association of pupil transportation; (d) One representative from the Washington state transit association; and (e) One of the following: (i) A representative from the community transportation association of the Northwest; or (ii) A representative from the community action council association. (3) The eight nonvoting members are legislators as follows: (a) Four members from the house of representatives, two from each of the two largest caucuses, appointed by the speaker of the house of representatives, two who are members of the house transportation policy and budget committee and two who are members of the house appropriations committee; and (b) Four members from the senate, two from each of the two largest caucuses, appointed by the president of the senate, two members of the transportation committee and two members of the ways and means committee. I-4 Appendix I

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(4) Gubernatorial appointees of the council will serve two-year terms. Members may not receive compensation for their service on the council, but will be reimbursed for actual and necessary expenses incurred in performing their duties as members as set forth in ______________. (5) The secretary of transportation or a designee shall serve as the chair. (6) The department of transportation shall provide necessary staff support for the council. (7) The council may receive gifts, grants, or endowments from public or private sources that are made from time to time, in trust or otherwise, for the use and benefit of the purposes of the council and spend gifts, grants, or endowments or income from the public or private sources according to their terms, unless the receipt of the gifts, grants, or endowments violates RCW 42.17.710. Council--Duties (as amended by __________). (Effective until _________.) To assure implementation of the Program for Agency Coordination Transportation, the council, in coordination with stakeholders, shall: (1) Develop guidelines for local planning of coordinated transportation in accordance with this chapter; (2) Initiate local planning processes by contacting the board of commissioners and county councils in each county and encouraging them to convene local planning forums for the purpose of implementing special needs coordinated transportation programs at the community level; (3) Work with local community forums to designate a local lead organization that shall cooperate and coordinate with private and nonprofit transportation brokers and providers, local public transportation agencies, local governments, and user groups; (4) Provide a forum at the state level in which state agencies will discuss and resolve coordination issues and program policy issues that may impact transportation coordination and costs; (5) Provide guidelines for state agencies to use in creating policies, rules, or procedures to encourage the participation of their constituents in community-based planning and coordination, in accordance with this chapter; (6) Facilitate state-level discussion and action on problems and barriers identified by the local forums that can only be resolve at either the state or federal level; Appendix I I-5

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(7) Develop and test models for determining the impacts of facility siting and program policy decisions on transportation costs; (8) Develop methodologies and provide support to local and state agencies in identifying transportation costs; (9) Develop guidelines for setting performance measures and evaluating performance; (10) Develop monitoring reporting criteria and processes to assess state and local level of participation with this chapter; (11) Administer and manage grant funds to develop, test, and facilitate the implementation of coordinated systems; (12) Develop minimum standards for safety, driver training, and vehicles, and provide models for processes and technology to support coordinated service delivery systems; (13) Provide a clearinghouse for sharing information about transportation coordination best practices and experiences; (14) Promote research and development of methods and tools to improve the performance of transportation coordination in the state; (15) Provide technical assistance and support to communities; (16) Facilitate, monitor, provide funding as available, and give technical support to local planning processes; (17) Form, convene, and give staff support to stakeholder work groups as needed to continue work on removing barriers to coordinating transportation. (18) Advocate for the coordination of transportation for people with special transportation needs at the federal, state, and local levels; (19) Recommend to the legislature changes in laws to assist coordination of transportation services; (20) Petition the office of financial management to make whatever changes are deemed necessary to identify transportation costs in all executive agency budgets; (21) Report to the legislature by December 2000, on council activities including, but not limited to, the progress of community planning processes, what demonstration projects have been undertaken, how coordination affected service levels, and whether these effort produced savings that allowed expansion of services. Reports must be made once every two years thereafter, and other times as the council deems necessary. I-6 Appendix I

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Local Planning forums. (Effective until ___________.) The council may request, and may require as a condition of receiving coordination grants, selected county governments to convene local planning forums and invite participation of all entities, including tribal governments, that serve or transport persons with special transportation needs. Counties are encouraged to coordinate and combine their forums and planning processes with other counties, as they find it appropriate. The local community forums must: (1) Designate a lead organization to facilitate the community planning process on an ongoing basis; (2) Identify functional boundaries for the local coordinated transportation system; (3) Clarify roles and responsibilities of the various participants; (4) Identify community resources and needs; (5) Prepare a plan for developing a coordinated transportation system that meets the intent of this chapter, addresses community needs, and efficiently uses community resources to address unmet needs; (6) Implement the community coordinated transportation plan; (7) Develop performance measures consistent with council guidelines; (8) Develop a reporting process consistent with council guidelines; (9) Raise issues and barriers to the council when resolution is needed at either the state or federal level; (10) Develop a process for open discussion and input on local policy and facility siting decisions that may have an impact on the special needs transportation costs and service delivery of other programs and agencies in the community. Council--Termination. The agency council on coordinated transportation is terminated on _________, as provided in ___________. Appendix I I-7