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D.4-1 APPENDIX D.4 HPST USER'S GUIDE 1.0 Introduction The Historic Property Screening Tool (HPST) prototype provides a user-friendly means to manage information about historic contexts and historic properties in a database and to record the basis for decisions about individual properties' eligibility for listing on the National Register. The tool allows users to create and edit historic contexts in a database format with links to related documents and to create and edit records for historic properties with links to maps and images. The HPST also steps the user through the decision-making process typically used when determining the National Register criteria (A, B, C or D) under which a property is eligible and then steps the user through an integrity evaluation. By using the HPST consistently, a Department of Transportation, State Historic Preservation Office, or other organization involved in the cultural resource management (CRM) field will build a database of historic properties and contexts, as well as capture the history of the decision- making process through time. The goal of the HPST and ECREL is to help CRM professionals determine whether or not a property is eligible for listing in the National Register. The process CRM professionals normally use (or should be using based on the Secretary of the Interior's standards and guidelines and on National Register guidance) was analyzed, and the two prototype tools (the HPST and ECREL) were developed to streamline and improve the evaluation process. These tools provide a consistent, easy-to-use framework for making (and in turn justifying and defending) significance evaluations. They also allow for easy access to evaluation information and record the decision-making process.

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D.4-2 The table below describes the current process and describes how the two prototypes might be used to facilitate and improve the process: The Process Role of the Prototypes You have a property (site, building, Enter information about the property in the HPST. structure, object, district, etc.) that you You may structure the information about the property want to evaluate for National Register in a way that is meaningful to you, and that includes (NR) eligibility. the property attributes that are relevant to determining eligibility. Find a historic context that contains 1. Look for a relevant context in the HPST. predefined property types into which your 2. Use ECREL to search for relevant historic contexts site fits best. Contexts have predefined if not found in the HPST. property types that have already been linked to the NR criteria. For example, property type X represents a significant property under NR criterion D. If you cannot find a relevant historic 1. Use ECREL to search for similar contexts that context, develop a historic context. could be used as a model for your context or for relevant material that might be incorporated in your context. 2. Use the HPST to develop a new historic context, storing key components in the database. By using the HPST, you ensure that contexts are being used in a consistent manner and that all necessary elements are included. You compare your property to the property 1. Use the Criteria Evaluation form in the HPST to types included in the historic context and record your decisions about NR criteria under ask the following question: Does my which the property is eligible. property meet the required criteria to 2. Use the Integrity Evaluation wizard in the HPST to be considered a representation of this record your decisions about the property's property type? These criteria include integrity. required levels of integrity that the property must exhibit (i.e., the seven aspects of integrity). If the context and the property are in the HPST, you can use the Criteria Evaluation and Integrity Evaluation functions to document the process and your reasons for making an NR evaluation. If the answer to this question is YES, you 1. Use the HPST to print an Evaluation Summary have an NR eligible property and you report as part of the documentation for your know under what NR criteria it is eligible evaluation. for listing in the NR. 2. Use the HPST to print your new Historic Context report and submit to ECREL for inclusion in the library.

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D.4-3 The reports created from the HPST are not intended to replace National Register nomination forms. The HPST reports are to be used to communicate the results of an evaluation among consultants, DOTs, SHPOs, and other Section 106 consulting parties. The HPST and ECREL were not created to increase the work load of state and federal agency staff. Rather, these tools should provide consistency--in terms of the format, presentation, and content of evaluation documents--that is sorely lacking in current documentation. These tools will also decrease development and review time for eligibility evaluations as the documentation levels needed for effective decision making are made explicit and readily accessible, eliminating extraneous materials often inserted into current documents. Ultimately, these tools should replace currently used evaluation report formats, forms, and correspondence, as the majority of decision-making efforts are documented and captured in a single format. Also, historic contexts that are developed in the HPST will be no more time consuming (and may be less time consuming) to create than the current method of compiling information using word processing software. The use of the HPST for context development also increases the likelihood that the resulting historic context will contain the information and guidance needed to evaluate National Register eligibility. It should be noted, however, that the inclusion of existing contexts is more problematic. Users may not have time to enter all of the data into the HPST. Section 6.1.1 describes Using an Existing Context, a method for linking to an existing context by entering minimum information.

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D.4-4 2.0 Objectives This user's guide provides guidance on the use of the Historic Property Screening Tool. It is organized to guide a user through the application, introducing key concepts and providing task- specific step-by-step instructions when necessary. The manual provides sufficient information to enable a user to: Add/Edit a Historic Context Add/Edit a Property Perform a Criteria Evaluation Perform an Integrity Evaluation Run Reports The typical user is assumed to be a CRM professional with a basic understanding of office applications for computers (such as MS Word). It is assumed the user is also familiar with the National Register nomination process and with the content and formats for historic contexts. The HPST developers relied on the following references as the source of the business rules guiding design of the HPST: 48 FR 44716, Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Historic Preservation Planning (1983); National Register Bulletin 15: How to Apply the National Register Criteria for Evaluation (Washington, D.C.: 1991); and Hardesty, Donald L. and Barbara J. Little, Assessing Site Significance, A Guide for Archaeologists and Historians (Walnut Creek: Alta Mira Press, 2000). The evaluation process was designed primarily for buildings, but the HPST is intended to be used for any category of property. Archaeologists will find the Hardesty and Little reference invaluable for applying the National Register process to archaeological sites.

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D.4-5 3.0 Requirements The HPST is distributed as a run-time MS Access 2000 application. The program will run on Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Windows XP. The minimum requirement is NT 4.0 SP3. If you have Access 2000, you may use the run-time version installation disks to install the HPST database. Microsoft Data Access Components version 2.7 (MDAC 2.7) must be installed on the PC in order for the application to work correctly. A copy of the MDAC 2.7 installation package is included in the HPST directory. You may install it by running MDAC_TYP.EXE.

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D.4-6 4.0 Installation The application is delivered in an installation package and requires that the person installing the HPST have local administrator rights on the machine on which they wish to install the HPST. The file HPST.mdb can be installed on an individual's computer, or in a shared server directory. The installation package needs to be executed on every individual's computer who will be using the application, even if the file HPST.mdb will reside in a shared server directory. If the application resides on a server, then appropriate network security permissions must be granted to the users of the application on either the folder or file. It is strongly recommended that a consistent directory structure be used with this application. By default, when the application is installed, subdirectories Maps, Images, and Narratives are created in the HPST directory. If the database is to be shared, the directories should be accessible by all users. The HPST will allow you to link documents to database records. Any format can be used, but the user who wishes to view the documents must have software on his or her machine to support the file format. For example, the map formats can be a shape file or MXD file. However, the appropriate software to view the maps must be on the user's PC. If the system is to be shared, it may be safer to store all maps as MS Word or Acrobat or other common format. System Requirements To use MS Access 2000 and the HPST database, you will need: PC with a Pentium 75-megahertz (MHz) or higher processor MS Windows 95 or later operating system, or MS Windows NT Workstation operating system version 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later For Windows 95 or Windows 98: 16 megabytes (MB) of RAM for the operating system, plus an additional 8 MB of RAM for Access For Windows NT Workstation: 32 MB of RAM for the operating system, plus an additional 8 MB of RAM for Access 170 MB of available hard-disk space for typical installation; your hard-disk usage will vary depending on configuration. Choices made during custom installation may require more or less hard-disk space. CD-ROM drive

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D.4-7 Installing the HPST Insert the CD in your computer's CD drive. Click the Start button in the bottom left corner of your screen and select Run from the pop-up list. Click the Browse button to browse to the location of the installation files (your CD drive) and select setup.exe. Click Open (the file name will be inserted on the Run screen). Click OK. If other applications are running, a screen will appear like the one at right, and you will be given the option of closing the applications before proceeding. To close running applications, click the OK button. To continue with the installation, click Open (the file name will be inserted on the Run screen). Click OK on the run screen to begin the installation. Click OK to continue. Click the button with the computer on it to continue the installation.

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D.4-8 Select the HPST Group and click the Continue button. The installation is complete.

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D.4-9 5.0 Interface Overview All of the functions of the Historic Property Screening Tool are found on the Main Switchboard. The interface includes the Main and Reports switchboards. 5.1 Main Switchboard Contexts: Opens forms to enter or edit information detailing a historic context; includes area of significance, theme, time period, context level, geographic limits, maps, references, narrative, and property types. The property types include the following information: description, registration information, requirement statements for each aspect of integrity, and research questions. Properties: Opens forms to enter or edit information detailing a property; includes property ID, Smithsonian ID, name, category, owner, attributes, maps, photos, references, and Universal Transverse Mercator zones (UTMs). It is expected that the properties entered in this database are potentially historically significant and may be evaluated for National Register eligibility at some time in the future. Criteria Evaluation: Opens a form to select a property and a historic context/property type and to record evaluation information to document why a property is eligible under Criterion A, B, C and/or D. A historic context and property must be entered in the HPST before you can perform a criteria evaluation. Integrity Evaluation: Opens forms to select a property and historic context/property type and evaluate aspects of integrity. A Criteria Evaluation must be entered for the selected property and historic context/property type before you can perform an integrity evaluation. Print Report: Opens the Reports Switchboard. Display Database Window: Closes the Main Switchboard and opens the MS Access database window. Exit Microsoft Access: Closes the Historic Property Screening Tool.

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D.4-10 5.2 Reports Switchboard From this switchboard, you can select, preview and print the following types of reports: By Property: View information for a selected property. By Context: View information for a selected context. By Evaluation: View the criteria and integrity evaluation information for a selected property. 5.3 Action Buttons Many forms contain buttons that, when clicked, perform a specific action. The following buttons are used to manipulate files linked to the database record: Delete: Click this button to delete a file. View: Click this button to launch the appropriate software and load the linked file. For example, if the linked file is a PDF, Adobe Acrobat will be launched and the selected file opened. Find: Use this to browse to a file's location and link it to a database record. Add : Use this to add a new record for a specific object (e.g., map).

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D.4-11 6.0 Using the Interface The Historic Property Screening Tool interface includes all of the information and functionality required to create, view, edit, and report any record(s) in the database. The sections below provide step-by-step instructions for completing tasks using the tool. The Contexts, Properties, and Integrity Evaluation functions are designed as wizards that step you through the forms in a defined sequence. A Next button on each form will take you to the next form in the sequence. A Back button will return you to the previous form. However, you do not need to use these buttons for navigation. You may click on any tab to jump directly to the selected form. A Save button may be used at any time to save your work up to that point and return to the main switchboard. NOTE: The easiest way to move between fields on all forms is to press TAB on your keyboard. 6.1 Main Switchboard The Main Switchboard is loaded when the Historic Property Screening Tool is opened. Click on a button to start a task.

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D.4-16 6.1.2 Properties The Properties form is opened when you select Properties from the main switchboard. Use this screen to enter or update information about historic properties. To create a new property, select from the Select a Property drop-down list. To update an existing property, select an existing property from the Select a Property drop-down list. The following instructions assume you are entering a new property. Enter the Property ID in the Property ID box (required). Enter the Smithsonian ID in the Smithsonian ID box. If the ID does not exist, leave this space blank. Enter the Property Name in the Property Name box (required). Select a Property Category from the Property Category drop-down list (required). Enter the name or title of property Owner in the Owner box. Attributes Attributes are entered one field at a time. You may enter as many attributes for the property as you wish. If you make a mistake, or decide the attribute does not apply to the property, click the Delete button next to the corresponding attribute row. Defining an attribute is a two-step process. First, select or define a label for the attribute. A label may be very specific (e.g., architectural style, foundation materials, or historic event). The same attribute label may be used as often as needed. The second step is to define the value for the attribute. For example, "Architectural Style" may have the value "Italianate." Attributes for a building may look like the following: Some attribute labels have been predefined. You may select any of these (click the down arrow in the attributes field to view predefined attributes) and enter your values. You may also define new labels by typing them in an empty box.

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D.4-17 Maps You may link to one or more maps associated with the property. Each map path should be placed in a new input box. Type the UNC path in the input box to specify the name and path of the map, or use the Find button to locate the map on your network. The map may be a Word, PDF, TIFF, or other standard format. File types used by mapping software such as ESRI's ArcView may also be linked to a property. In order to view the linked maps, the users must have the appropriate software on their machine. Photos You may link to one or more photo(s) associated with a property. Multiple photo references are acceptable. Enter the UNC path or URL in the List of Photos box or use Find to browse to a property's corresponding photo. References Type references in the List of References input boxes. It is recommended that you use a separate box for each reference.

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D.4-18 UTMs Use this form to define the Universal Transverse Mercator zones (UTMs) for a property. Click inside the Easting and Northing text boxes to enter your coordinates. You may enter as many coordinates as are available for your property's location. 6.1.3 Criteria Evaluation This form is used to record decisions about National Register criteria applicability for a property with respect to a specific historic context. In order to use this function, the historic context and property must have been entered and saved in the HPST. Select Property, Context When you first select the Criteria Evaluation function from the main menu, the form is empty. You must first select a property from the drop-down list and then select the context and property type. If a criteria evaluation has already been done for this combination of property and context/property type, you will see the message shown below. If you want to edit or review the information in the form, click Yes. Otherwise, you may go to Reports and print this evaluation, or you may select a different context/property type and perform a different evaluation.

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D.4-19 Criteria You may now enter your determination for each criterion. Check the associated checkbox for each criterion that is significant. This form was derived from the National Park Service guidance on preparing National Register nominations. Please refer to National Register Bulletin 15 for additional information that will help complete this form. If the property is eligible under Criterion A, enter the associated event; describe the national, state and/or local significance; and describe briefly how the property is associated with the event. If the property is eligible under Criterion B, enter the names of the associated person(s); describe the national, state and/or local significance; and describe briefly how the property is associated with the person(s). If the property is eligible under Criterion C, describe briefly the distinctive characteristics that make the property significant; describe the national, state and/or local significance; and describe briefly how the property illustrates the characteristics. Immediately to the right of the Criterion D input boxes is a Research Questions button. If Research Questions have been defined for the context, they can be viewed by clicking this button. If the property is eligible under Criterion D, enter the categories of information that might be derived from the property and the importance of that information.

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D.4-20 6.1.4 Integrity Evaluation This set of forms is used to evaluate the aspects of integrity for a property with respect to a specific historic context. In order to use this function, the Criteria Evaluation for the property must be completed and saved in the HPST. Select Property, Context When you first select the Integrity Evaluation function from the main menu, the forms are empty. You must first select a property from the drop-down list and then select the context and property type. If an integrity evaluation has already been done for this combination of property and context/property type, you will see the message shown below. If you want to edit or review the information in the forms, click Yes. Otherwise, you may go to Reports and print this evaluation, or you may select a different context/property type and do a different evaluation.

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D.4-21 Aspects of Integrity You may now enter your determination for each aspect of integrity. A form (tab) exists for each of the seven aspects of integrity; however, not all contexts will require that a property meet all aspects in order to be eligible. If the context has specified the requirements to meet an aspect, it is displayed on the form. If nothing is displayed in the area to the right of the aspect of integrity label, no requirement was defined in the context. Immediately to the right of the aspect requirements description are two buttons: Research Questions and Definitions. If Research Questions have been defined for the context, they can be viewed by clicking the button. The Definitions button displays the general definitions of each aspect of integrity. When you perform a new evaluation of integrity, two fields will be empty: Has integrity? Justification You may select from three options to answer the first question: Yes, No, and No Basis for Evaluation. The first two are self- explanatory; the third option should be entered when you feel that you need more information on either the context or the property. For example, you might choose "No Basis for Evaluation" and then in Justification, enter "Field study to collect more information on this aspect of integrity is needed." The lower half of each aspect of integrity form is used to display information about the property. All forms show the attributes defined for the property; use the scroll bar at the right to scroll up and down through the list. UTMs are shown only on the Location form. Other forms may include links to maps and/or photos as shown at right. The property evaluation at right includes several photographs and maps, any one of which can be viewed by clicking the View button next to it.

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D.4-22 Integrity Matrix The last form compiles your responses to the individual aspects of integrity and displays the information in a color-coded matrix. The rows represent National Register criteria A, B, C, and D. Criteria that are not applicable (i.e., not selected when you did the Criteria Evaluation form) are shown as gray rows. Similarly, if an aspect of integrity is not applicable for the selected context/property type (as defined under contexts), it will be shown in gray. In the example at right, the site being evaluated is deemed eligible under D and has integrity of setting and association (green), but does not have integrity of workmanship. The reviewer felt more information was needed to determine integrity of materials. The reviewer has indicated that she believes the site is eligible for listing and gives reasons for this finding. The following actions can be executed at any time: Click Cancel to cancel the evaluation without saving. Click Save to save the evaluation and return to the Main Switchboard. You may save an incomplete evaluation and return to finish it later.

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D.4-23 6.2 Reports Switchboard The Reports Switchboard is loaded by selecting Print Reports on the Main Switchboard. 6.2.1 Property Report The Property Report is loaded from the Reports Switchboard. The Property Report contains the property details information. The report displays the property identification information, specific attribute data, map and photo lists, and UTM data. Attribute information includes attribute and description. UTM data include the easting and northing coordinates. Click By Property and select the property name from the list. If no property is selected, ALL properties in the database will be included in the report. The standard MS Access 2000 report controls are available, including print, zoom and scroll buttons. Close the report by clicking the X in the top right corner.

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D.4-24 6.2.2 Historic Context Report The Historic Context Report is loaded from the Reports Switchboard. The Historic Context Report contains the historic context and property type information. Historic context information includes the theme, time period, geographic location, and narrative information. Property type information includes registration requirements, physical and associative characteristics, and research questions. Click By Context and select the context from the list. If no context is selected, ALL contexts will be included in the report. The standard MS Access 2000 report controls are available, including print, zoom and scroll buttons. Close the report by clicking the X in the top right corner.

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D.4-25 6.2.3 Evaluation Report The Evaluation Report is loaded from the Reports Switchboard. The Evaluation Report contains both the criteria and integrity evaluation information. The report displays the evaluation criteria and associated descriptions, integrity evaluations and justifications, and eligibility criteria and descriptions. Click By Evaluation and select the property name. If no property is selected, ALL properties in the database will be included in the report. If a property has been evaluated under more than one context, all evaluations for the selected property will be printed. The standard MS Access 2000 report controls are available, including print, zoom, and scroll buttons. Close the report by clicking the X in the top right corner.

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D.4-26 7.0 Administration Instructions for completing two recommended administration tasks are provided here. 7.1 Compact and Repair To ensure optimal performance, compact your Microsoft Access databases and Microsoft Access projects on a regular basis. To compact and repair the Historic Property Screening Tool, select Tools from the main menu. Select Database Utilities, then Compact and Repair Database. 7.2 Backup and Recovery A backup and recovery plan should be established for the Historic Property Screening Tool. A recommended plan is to have the database reside on a server that is backed up daily. If this is not possible, back up the Historic Property Screening Tool by copying the HPST.mdb to another location on a daily basis.