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60 APPENDIX B Full Questionnaire for States Not Participating in the Peer Exchange

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77 4. Do you use a postprocessor for economic impact? No Yes (Explain) 5. Do you use any other postprocessors? No Yes (Explain) 6. Please explain any other postprocessing of model outputs that is notable or innovative. Thank you! Please return the questionnaire to Alan Horowitz by February 15, 2005 Explanation of Less Common Terms All-or-nothing traffic assignment: All traffic between an origin and destination is assigned to the short path between that origin and destination and no traffic is assigned to any other path. Behavioral principles: Modeling philosophy that seeks to determine the amount and location of travel by looking at components of traveler decision processes. A model based on behavioral principles would differ substantially from one based entirely on empirical findings, such as growth factor methods. BPR curve: A simple expression that computes speed as a function of volume, originally developed at the Bureau of Public Roads. Composite impedance (or composite disutility): A measure of the separation between an origin and a destination (often as a function of travel time, travel cost, and convenience) that takes into consideration the accessibility of more than one mode between the origin and destination. Dynamic all-or-nothing assignment: See "all-or-nothing assignment." Trips are assigned within small intervals of time, so as to track the progress of trips over time between their origins and destinations. Dynamic equilibrium traffic assignment: An application of equilibrium principles (see "static equilibrium traffic assignment") where trips are also assigned within small intervals of time, so as to track the progress of trips over time between their origins and destinations. Fratar factoring: A technique for forecasting origin-to-destination trip patterns by applying row and column factors to an existing origindestination table. GPS-based survey: Use of the global positioning system to trace the location of a traveler or vehicle over time, which would be linked to a travel diary. Gravity expression: Sometimes called a "gravity model," which determines the production-to-attraction trip pattern as a function of the number of productions and attractions in each zone and measures of proximity between zones. HCM: Highway Capacity Manual. Household sectors: Groups of households within an economic or land use model, usually organized by economic status or life-cycle status. Industrial sectors: Groups of similar businesses, usually organized by type of product or service. Inputoutput (IO) model: A type of economic model that tracks flows of revenue (or sales) between industries and households in a national or regional economy. An IO model is organized by sectors. A single cell in an IO table would list the amount of revenue gained by a producing sector that comes from a consuming sector.

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