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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES Information on Agencies or Organizations Currently Implementing EXHIBIT V-52 This Strategy SMSA Protective Clothing Promotional The Wisconsin Motorcycle Safety Program promoted protective Poster apparel in this promotional piece targeting riders. Additional information is available from the FHWA Motorcyclist Advisory Council: http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/mac/index.htm. Objective 11.1 F--Increase Motorcycle Rider Safety Awareness Strategy 11.1 F1--Form Strategic Alliances with Motorcycle User Community to Foster and Promote Motorcycle Safety (T) General Description An important step of any program to improve motorcycle safety is to build strategic alliances between highway agencies, law enforcement agencies, and the motorcycle rider, safety, and education communities. The motorcycle safety community is eager to be a part of the solution because they know that any improvement in motorcycle safety can have a direct effect on them (i.e., it may save their life or the life of a friend or loved one). It is recommended that the members of a strategic alliance represent a cross-section of the motorcycling community in the state or region, and that the motorcycle safety issues of that particular state or region be addressed. Strategic alliances are critical to the success of improved motorcycle safety for a number of reasons. Alliances allow stakeholders with different ideas to have input and provide an opportunity to discover common causes and desired outcomes. Fortunately, safety is an easy issue on which to join together, and while different groups may have different ideas on the best or most appropriate ways to improve safety, usually all stakeholders can agree that reducing motorcycle fatalities and injuries is a worthy goal. With a common starting point, motorcycle safety approaches from a diverse set of perspectives can be suggested, fleshed out and refined. Where individual stakeholder groups can become very narrowly focused on a specific type of safety strategy, an alliance provides an opportunity for out-of-the box ideas and solutions to be brought forth, and forces a recognition of the legitimate concerns and goals of other stakeholders in the same community. Any safety initiative is only as effective as the stakeholders' commitment to implement it. Strategic alliances increase the likelihood that the diverse stakeholders in the motorcycle community will buy in to the safety initiatives and encourage their use among the members of the groups they represent. Even when safety laws are passed, if they are not understood or respected, they are ineffective. A strategic alliance of law-enforcement, safety engineers, health care providers, researchers, and motorcycle riders can act as one voice to educate riders and other motorists about the importance of motorcycle safety efforts and the consequences of ignoring them. An alliance that represents not only the voice of public safety, but also the voices of riders themselves will be much more effective in promoting the message of motorcycle safety. V-93

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES NHTSA discovered the benefit of collaborating with a diverse stakeholder community when it launched the National Agenda for Motorcycle Safety (NAMS). Developing the framework for NAMS involved participation from experts in industry, research, training, and rider communities, as well as health care, media, insurance and law enforcement. The result was a collaborative document that has gained broad-based support and action. According to NHTSA's Motorcycle Safety Program, "The agency values its partnerships with stakeholders in the motorcycle manufacturing and aftermarket industries, as well as the rider and education communities . . . NHTSA views interactions with stakeholders as a crucial means to allow it to collaborate on how to best improve these and other issue areas affecting motorcycle safety" (NHTSA, 2002). Key state or regional stakeholders include: State motorcycle safety manager State Highway Safety office Rider organizations--ABATE, HOG chapters, GWRRA, etc. Law enforcement and licensing authorities The state's motorcycle safety advisory committee--These groups exist in 25 states (SMSA, 2002), meet frequently and often hold public meetings to hear constituency issues and concerns. Additional information is available from the state's motorcycle safety manager. If a state doesn't have such an advisory committee, forming one is the first step of this strategy. Further support can be gained by partnering with: The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) The Motorcycle Rider's Foundation (MRF) The Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) Motorcycle issues generate interest and excitement from many quarters, and it is common for the motorcyclists in any agency office (e.g., DOT, enforcement, licensing, etc.) to take a keen interest in motorcycle-related initiatives. This interest should be encouraged and used in the development of safety initiatives. Much can be gained by involving those who have expertise in their field, personal experience as a rider, and an interest in the issues that involve both. NAMS presented several recommendations that transportation agencies can implement with the advocacy and support of the motorcycling community. These points serve as an example of the safety ideas produced by a successful motorcycle strategic alliance: Identify and prioritize roadway hazards to motorcycle operation. Develop and revise highway standards at all levels--federal, state, county and local--to reflect the needs of motorcyclists and encourage motorcycle-friendly design, construc- tion, and maintenance procedures. V-94

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES Create a working group to identify changes to highway standards to increase motorcycle safety. Post specific warnings for motorcyclists where unavoidable hazards exist. Revise the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) so that roadway signs better communicate roadway or construction conditions that present potential problems for motorcyclists. Educate road design and maintenance personnel about conditions that present potential problems for motorcyclists. Include motorcycles in the design and deployment of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). The keys to a successful strategic alliance are to identify as many diverse stakeholders as possible; encourage active participation not only by traditional safety advocates, but also by rider organizations; identify common goals around which to base the mission and goals of the alliance; and use the broad range of perspectives to look for new opportunities for safety improvement. EXHIBIT V-53 Strategy Attributes for Forming Strategic Alliances with the Motorcycle Community to Foster and Promote Motorcycle Safety Technical Attributes Target The target of this strategy is motorcycle rider advocacy groups and organizations, the motorcycle safety and rider training community, and local motorcycle safety advisory groups. Expected Effectiveness No formal evaluation has been conducted to determine the effectiveness of this strategy at reducing motorcycle fatalities. Experience has shown that forming a strategic alliance has been an effective tool to advance motorcycle safety strategies because it includes all stakeholders. Keys to Success A key to success is the identification of key stakeholders in the state or region. Motorcycle safety education and awareness will be better served with the broad-based support of the motorcycling community. Motorcycle safety education and awareness cannot be effectively served without the broad-based support of the motorcycling community. Potential Difficulties Not everyone is going to agree on everything, especially when it comes to discussing universal helmet laws. This is one of the most contentious issues of this community. The secret to success is not hinging all expectations on a single issue when there are many issues to be addressed. Appropriate Measures Appropriate measures include number of stakeholders involved, number of meetings and Data held, organization and structure of meetings, initiative process, and communication feedback process. Effectiveness of countermeasures introduced by the strategic alliance membership is also a useful measure. Associated Needs Public education and information activities complement this strategy. V-95

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES EXHIBIT V-53 (Continued) Strategy Attributes for Forming Strategic Alliances with the Motorcycle Community to Foster and Promote Motorcycle Safety Organizational and Institutional Attributes Organizational, This strategy can be implemented by any agency. Institutional and Policy Issues Central to the success of any motorcycle safety initiative is to form alliances with key stakeholders in transportation and motorcycle safety, licensing, enforcement and the motorcycle community. Many state governments support a Motorcycle Safety Advisory Committee (MSAC) through statute or rule. Often, these committees comprise motorcycle leaders, authorities and activists from across the state, and include representatives from state police, DMV, transportation safety and the state's motorcycle safety program. Partnering with MSAC groups is essential to begin to (a) understand the problems motorcyclists face and (b) provide a mechanism to convey information between researchers, policy makers and the state leaders and activists within the motorcycling community. Issues Affecting Implementation time can vary from 1 to 4 months, depending on the length of time Implementation Time it takes to identify key stakeholders. Costs Involved Costs are negligible. There may be expenses associated with hosting meetings and hearings. To be effective, these meetings should be held in different locations around the state or region. Training and Other None identified. Personnel Needs Legislative Needs None identified. Other Key Attributes None identified. Information on Agencies or Organizations Currently Implementing This Strategy A Motorcycle Safety Advisory Board has served Washington State since 1982. The Board consists of five members appointed by the Director of the Department of Licensing; appointments are for 2 years. The Board meets quarterly and has been instrumental in the investigation, development and support of motorcycle safety legislation. Priorities include: Public awareness of motorcycle safety Motorcycle safety education programs conducted by public and private entities Classroom and on-cycle training Improved motorcycle operator testing For more information, visit http://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/. Similar committees have been established in Oregon, Idaho, California, Arizona, Delaware, Kentucky, Indiana, Wisconsin, Montana and other states. This is an excellent resource to begin the development of this strategy. V-96

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES On February 28, 2004, WisDOT convened the Wisconsin National Agenda for Motorcycle Safety (NAMS) Summit. The summit represented the first state-level workshop on motor- cycle safety developed from the National Agenda for Motorcycle Safety report and involved extensive input from WisDOT's partners in traffic safety, including motorcycle advocacy groups, law enforcement, educational institutions and others. Those who attended the meeting participated in small group brainstorming sessions in a workshop setting to identify: (1) the problems and issues which contribute to motorcycle crashes and fatalities and (2) what each organization can do, using the resources available to them, to address the problem. The feedback obtained from all of these meetings was invaluable to the development of strategies contained within the 2004 Motorcycle Safety Action Plan and for long-range, motorcycle safety planning efforts (Wisconsin Department of Transportation, 2004).--For more information, visit http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/library/publications/ topic/safety/motorcycleplan.pdf. The Virginia DOT (VDOT) has been actively involved in addressing the unique characteristics of motorcyclists and their particular safety concerns on the roadway. A standing committee was formed, consisting of representatives from the DOT, local government, DMV and motorcycle community. Outcomes include: Greater awareness of motorcyclists' concerns Instructional memorandums regarding posting signs on longitudinal and transverse joints on bridges Collaboration with other utilities to share motorcycle safety information Motorcycle safety brochure to be delivered to all holders of Virginia motorcycle class operator's licenses by VDOT Riders Helping Riders (RHR) is an instructional program designed to encourage motor- cyclists to intervene to prevent drinking and riding by their motorcyclist peers. The program is based on focus group research which found that riders consider themselves to be united by an interest in riding, and willing to help other riders in need, but that a sense of individualism limits the extent to which riders are willing to intervene in drinking and riding. RHR is intended to convince motorcyclists that an impaired rider needs their help, and that they are in the best position to provide help. The program provides a "toolkit" of techniques for separating drinking from riding, discouraging riders from becoming impaired, recognizing impairment, and discouraging impaired riders from riding. An optional role-playing module is included. At the end of class, students are asked to sign a pledge to do their best to help an impaired rider live to ride another day. RHR was developed by NHTSA with the assistance of instructors from the South Carolina Rider Education Program and pilot tested by instructors of Georgia's Department of Driver Services, Motorcycle Safety Program. More information is available at: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/portal/site/nhtsa/template.MAXIMIZE/menuitem.d7975d55 e8abbe089ca8e410dba046a0/?javax.portlet.tpst=4670b93a0b088a006bc1d6b760008a0c_ws_ MX&javax.portlet.prp_4670b93a0b088a006bc1d6b760008a0c_viewID=detail_view&itemID= 0d6576ca7dcb8110VgnVCM1000002fd17898RCRD&overrideViewName=Article. V-97

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES Websites Motorcycle Safety Advisory Committees: Montana--http://motorcycle.msun.edu/advisory.htm Minnesota--http://www.dps.state.mn.us/mmsc/latest/MMSCHomeSecondary. asp?cid=2&mid=52 Wyoming--http://legisweb.state.wy.us/statutes/titles/Title31/T31CH5AR15.htm Missouri--http://www.moga.mo.gov/statutes/C300-399/3020000136.HTM Idaho--http://idahostar.org/pdf/annuals/annual96.htm Oregon--http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/TS/motorcyclesafety.shtml Strategy 11.1 F2--Increase Awareness of the Consequences of Aggressive Riding, Riding While Fatigued or Impaired, Unsafe Riding, and Poor Traffic Strategies (T) General Description Every year, hundreds of motorcycle riders are injured or killed in motorcycle crashes. The role of alcohol, unendorsed operation, and lack of training as risk factors has been well established (Objective 11.1 B--"Reduce the Number of Motorcycle Crashes Due to Rider Impairment" and Objective 11.1 C--"Reduce the Number of Motorcycle Crashes Due to Unlicensed or Untrained Motorcycle Riders"). However, what is not known is the crash representation of such characteristics as aggressive riding, riding while fatigued, unsafe riding, and poor traffic strategies. Motorcycling is a risky activity. In terms of vehicle miles traveled, motorcyclists are about 27 times more likely to die in a crash than someone riding in a passenger car, and six times more likely to be injured (NHTSA, 2003). Unfortunately, many motorcyclists are willing to magnify that risk by exercising poor judgment and riding recklessly. Below are samples of police descriptions of fatal crashes in 2003: Motorcycle versus auto: Motorcycle very high speed wheelie on Stark St.--80 yr. old woman pulled out, MC struck auto. Died at scene. Single vehicle: Motorcycle attempted to pass semi on right side, went off shoulder, hit road sign. Alcohol was a factor in this crash. Single vehicle lost control, very high speed, trying to flee from police. Double fatal. Rider observed at over 100 mph before pursuit. Single vehicle westbound at high speed lost control on corner of I-84 near NE 28th Ave. hit concrete center divider and launched into oncoming traffic where he was struck by a vehicle. Witnesses indicated motorcycle traveling 80 mph or faster prior to crash. NHTSA reports that one-half of the fatalities in single-vehicle crashes relate to problems negotiating a curve prior to a crash. Over 80 percent of motorcycle fatalities in single-vehicle crashes occur off the roadway. Operator DWI was a factor in 44 percent of all single-vehicle crashes. The problem of alcohol and motorcycling is compounded with the exercise of poor V-98

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES judgment and excessive, and in some cases extreme, speed. In fact, speed is a contributing factor in fatal motorcycle crashes 36 percent of the time, about twice the rate for drivers of passenger cars or light trucks (FARS, 2003). It is common to witness speeds double, and sometimes triple, that of posted limits. While motorcycle performance continues to improve, allowing greater speeds and better handling, many riders have failed to improve their caution and judgment accordingly. Speed, reckless riding and the competitive nature of some riders place motorcycle riders at an increased risk of crashing and becoming injured or killed. Rider education should include not only skills training, but also a discussion of the potential consequences of unsafe and aggressive riding. In addition to teaching safe riding strategies, statistics on fatalities, injuries, and legal consequences should be presented to increase awareness of the dangers associated with drinking and riding, speeding, and unsafe maneuvers. Rider training programs are a key element of motorcycle safety. They develop fundamental skills and safe riding strategies. However, such programs need to be supplemented with enforcement to be effective. Enforcement should include strict punishment and commensurate fines for aggressive or unsafe riding. Enforcement should also be highly visible and well-publicized to raise awareness not only of the safety risks of aggressive riding behaviors, but also of their legal consequences. Traffic laws violated by motorcycle riders can be more difficult to enforce than passenger vehicles because of their ability to accelerate to high speeds very quickly and to weave in and out of traffic. For the safety of the motorcyclist, the officer, and other motorists and pedestrians nearby, some law enforcement agencies have enacted "no pursuit" policies for motorcycle riders who violate traffic laws, and riders have learned that they can get away with aggressive driving behaviors. Law enforcement personnel should come together to identify new solutions for safely enforcing traffic laws among motorcycle riders. EXHIBIT V-54 Strategy Attributes for Increasing Awareness of the Consequences of Aggressive Riding, Riding While Fatigued or Impaired, Unsafe Riding, and Poor Traffic Strategies Technical Attributes Target The target of this strategy is the group of motorcycle riders involved in high-risk and reckless riding. Expected Effectiveness No formal evaluation has been conducted to determine the effectiveness of this strategy at reducing motorcycle fatalities. Keys to Success The keys to success are identifying the target population and working cooperatively with key stakeholders to target enforcement and public awareness efforts. Stakeholders include a motorcycle advisory group as well as the law enforcement, judicial, and motorcycle safety/training community. Potential Difficulties Locating a data source or developing a methodology to extract this information from existing data is likely the greatest challenge. Law enforcement can provide assistance in targeting the demographic. Appropriate Measures Appropriate measures include (1) number of harmful or hazardous events, (2) number and Data of individuals involved and (3) frequency of these events. Outcome measures should be developed to quantify the training, enforcement and judicial responses. Associated Needs A media and information campaign. V-99

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES EXHIBIT V-54 (Continued) Strategy Attributes for Increasing Awareness of the Consequences of Aggressive Riding, Riding While Fatigued or Impaired, Unsafe Riding, and Poor Traffic Strategies Organizational and Institutional Attributes Organizational, This strategy can be implemented by highway agencies responsible for highway Institutional and and motorcycle safety. Policy Issues Central to the success of any motorcycle safety initiative is to form alliances with key stakeholders in transportation and motorcycle safety, licensing, enforcement and the motorcycle community. Many state governments support a Motorcycle Safety Advisory Committee (MSAC) through statute or rule. Often, these committees comprise motorcycle leaders, authorities and activists from across the state, and include representatives from state police, DMV, transportation safety and the state's motorcycle safety program. Partnering with MSAC groups is essential to begin to (a) understand the problems motorcyclists face and (b) provide a mechanism to convey information between researchers, policy makers and the state leaders and activists within the motorcycling community. Issues Affecting Implementation time can vary from 3 to 6 months, depending on the length of time Implementation Time it takes to research the problem and identify stakeholders. Costs Involved Costs should not be a major factor, although they can vary, depending on the scope of effort and the specific actions being taken. Training and Other Increasing the awareness of the consequences of various motorcycle riding behaviors Personnel Needs does not necessarily require formal training or additional agency personnel, but it does require an awareness of the issues, a priority to address the issues, and a willingness to partner with key stakeholders to begin the process of effecting change. Legislative Needs None identified. Other Key Attributes Public education and information activities complement this strategy. Educational materials may be required to inform those implementing this strategy of effective treatment methods. EXHIBIT V-55 Radar Gun Measuring Motorcycle Speed of 132 mph Information on Agencies or Organizations Currently Implementing This Strategy Exhibit V-55 shows the speed at which a motorcyclist was captured riding (132 mph) on a rural highway with a designated speed of 55 mph. The crash scene photo in Exhibit V-56 is the crash scene of a rider who lost control traveling at a reported speed of 95 mph in a 45-mph speed zone. The collision killed the rider and seriously injured the passenger. V-100

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES EXHIBIT V-56 Crash Scene Involving Speeding Motorcyclist "Crash Car" Display EXHIBIT V-57 Crash Car Display The "Crash Car" display (Exhibit V-57) was acquired and reconstructed by the TEAM OREGON Motorcycle Safety Program. The motorcycle impacted the car at a reported speed of 90 mph, killing the operator and seriously injuring his passenger and the motorist. The display and storyboard were delivered across the state to schools (as part of "Project Graduation,") and to motorcycling and civic events, fairs and celebrations. It presented a sober and vivid reminder of the hazards of drinking and riding. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) has developed motorcyclist awareness PSAs for print and web applications in a variety of sizes and formats and will provide them at no cost to the state. Contact the MSF for more information. Riders Helping Riders (RHR) is an instructional program designed to encourage motorcyclists to intervene to prevent drinking and riding by their motorcyclist peers. See Strategy 11.1 F1 in this guide for a detailed description of the program. EXHIBIT V-58 MSF Motorcyclist Awareness PSAs V-101

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES Strategy 11.1 F3--Educate Operators of Other Vehicles to Be More Conscious of the Presence of Motorcyclists (T) General Description The Hurt Study (Hurt et al., 1981) revealed many disturbing facts that forever changed the face of motorcycling in the United States, including: Other Vehicle Violation of the Motorcycle Right-of-Way is a predominating factor in the 900 on-scene, in-depth accident cases; 50.9 percent of all those accidents are attributable to the driver of the other vehicle involved in the accident. This fact is especially clear when the multiple-vehicle collision data show that 64.9 percent of those accidents are due to the actions of the driver of the other vehicle. The typical accident in this category is portrayed by the automobile in traffic turning left into the path of the oncoming motorcycle. In such an accident, the culpability is exclusively due to the action of the driver of the automobile. The greatest part of this accident-cause factor is related to the failure of the automobile driver to see the oncoming motorcycle, or to see it in time to avoid the collision. This dominant culpability of the driver of the other vehicle is a critical exposition of the failure to detect a relatively unfamiliar vehicle on a collision path where motion conspicuity is absent. It emphasizes the special need for high contrast conspicuity for the motorcycle and rider. A special sampling of 62 of these cases showed that there were no drivers of the accidents involving automobiles who had any motorcycle experience; hence the motorcycle was an unfamiliar as well as inconspicuous target. Not much has changed since that finding. FARS data show the following statistics (FARS, 2003): About one-half (54 percent) of all motorcycles involved in fatal crashes in 2003 collided with another motor vehicle. In 78 percent of the two-vehicle crashes, the motorcycles involved were impacted in the front; only 5 percent were struck in the rear. In 38 percent of the two-vehicle fatal crashes involving a motorcycle and another vehicle, the other vehicle was turning left while the motorcycle was going straight, passing, or overtaking the vehicle. In 27 percent of the two-vehicle crashes, both vehicles were going straight. Motorcyclists are still affected by motorists who fail to see them and pull into their path, often cutting off any chance of escape and resulting in an injury crash. The National Agenda for Motorcycle Safety identified the following factors that, when combined, can cause drivers to overlook motorcyclists (NHTSA, 2000): Motorcycles and riders represent a relatively small component of the total traffic mix. Visual recognition is reduced. Many drivers are not expecting to see motorcyclists in traffic and therefore do not antici- pate routine encounters. Motorcycles are smaller visual targets and much more likely to become obscured. V-102

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES Automobiles and trucks have obstructions (door and roof pillars, outside mirrors, etc.) and blind spots that can obscure or hide a motorcyclist. Other conditions affecting the vehicle, including precipitation, glare, and cargo, can impair a driver's view and obscure a motorcyclist. Roadside objects, other vehicles, and light patterns can make it difficult to discern a motorcyclist. The problem of drivers not seeing motorcyclists is expected to get worse. That is, as the population of drivers continues to age, vision problems will likely become more prevalent (see NCHRP Report 500, Volume 9, "A Guide for Reducing Collisions Involving Older Drivers"). Tips on watching for motorcycles should be placed in older driver handbooks. The objective of this strategy is to promote public information campaigns to better educate motorists to be more conscious of the presence of motorcycles in the traffic mix. Several states have mounted clever motorist awareness campaigns to deliver that message (samples are provided at the end of this section). Distribution methods include driver education programs, driver manuals and tests, and remedial education programs for violators. Media include billboards, bus advertising, radio, and literature or posters displayed wherever motorists linger--visitor centers, motor vehicle offices, auto shows, gas pumps, banks, etc. Messages can be printed on license renewal notices or other general population mailings. Public information campaigns could be coordinated with Motorcycle Awareness Month, a month designated by many state motorcycling groups to heighten the awareness of motor- cycling. Typically, but not always, Motorcycle Awareness month is in May and aligns with the Motorcycle Awareness and You (MAY) theme. This event serves as an excellent opportunity for officials to engage with those involved in the motorcycling movement. Many DOTs support this activity with public information and education resources designed to draw awareness to the presence of motorcycles on our streets and highways, and to urge motorists to "Watch for Motorcycles." Highway agencies should involve the motorcycle safety and rider training community in this strategy. Motorcycle groups will likely seize the opportunity to assist with motorist and motorcyclist awareness programs. EXHIBIT V-59 Strategy Attributes for Educating Operators of Other Vehicles to be More Conscious of the Presence of Motorcyclists Technical Attributes Target The target of this strategy is operators of vehicles other than motorcycles. Expected Effectiveness No formal evaluation has been conducted to determine the effectiveness of this strategy at reducing motorcycle crashes, injuries or fatalities. Keys to Success The key to success is to involve the motorcycle rider and safety community in the development and distribution of this strategy. Representatives of the driver education, operator licensing and law enforcement communities can greatly assist. V-103

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES EXHIBIT V-59 (Continued) Strategy Attributes for Educating Operators of Other Vehicles to be More Conscious of the Presence of Motorcyclists Potential Difficulties A potential difficulty with this strategy is accurately targeting the appropriate group. A media and information campaign has to be very broad-based in order to reach the population of drivers of other vehicles. Appropriate Measures Depending on the scope of effort, process measures may include the existence and Data of a coordinated system, number of meetings held, number and type of materials produced, number of postings, and contacts made. Associated Needs A media and information campaign. Organizational and Institutional Attributes Organizational, Central to the success of any motorcycle safety initiative is to form alliances with Institutional and key stakeholders in transportation and motorcycle safety, licensing, enforcement Policy Issues and the motorcycle community. Many state governments support a Motorcycle Safety Advisory Committee (MSAC) through statute or rule. Often, these committees comprise motorcycle leaders, authorities and activists from across the state, and include representatives from state police, DMV, transportation safety and the state's motorcycle safety program. Partnering with MSAC groups is essential to begin to (a) understand the problems motorcyclists face and (b) provide a mechanism to convey information between researchers, policy makers and the state leaders and activists within the motorcycling community. Issues Affecting A public awareness campaign aimed at motorcyclists should be targeted around Implementation Time the prime riding season, when public awareness material can be distributed at locations where motorcyclists are most likely to be congregating (e.g., riding events, etc.). Personnel should identify the designation of a motorcycle awareness month. This period serves as an excellent time to work with stakeholders to advance this strategy. Campaigns are most effective when timed to coincide with the riding season. This will require highway agencies to work on information programs well in advance of the prime riding season, in order to have the public awareness campaign ready. Costs Involved Costs will vary depending on the scope of effort. Training and Other Educating operators of other vehicles to be more conscious of the presence of Personnel Needs motorcyclists does not necessarily require training or additional agency personnel, but it does require an awareness of the issues, a priority to address the issues, and a willingness to partner with key stakeholders to begin the process of effecting change. Legislative Needs None identified. Other Key Attributes Public education and information activities complement this strategy. Educational materials may be required to inform those implementing this strategy of effective treatment methods. V-104

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES EXHIBIT V-60 Oregon DOT Public Information Campaign Information on Agencies or Organizations Currently Implementing This Strategy The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has produced and distributed the campaigns shown above (Exhibit V-60). These images have appeared on bus advertising, billboards, and on posters that have been placed in DMV Field Offices, schools and colleges. The Wisconsin Motorcycle Safety Program has produced and distributed the Motorcycle Awareness and You (MAY) campaign (see Exhibit V-61). The Maryland Motorcycle Safety Program within the Motor Vehicles Division adopted the Take it Easy campaign (see Exhibit V-62). EXHIBIT V-62 EXHIBIT V-61 Take It Easy Campaign in Maryland MAY Campaign in Wisconsin V-105

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SECTION V--DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES EXHIBIT V-63 The SMSA supports a website of valuable resources MSF's Bikes Belong Campaign for Motorist Awareness. For more information, visit http://www.smsa.org/motorcycle_ awareness/idea_sampler/. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) has developed motorist awareness PSAs (Bikes Belong) for print and web applications in a variety of sizes and formats and will provide them at no cost to the state (see Exhibit V-63). MSF also distributes copies of Cars, Motorcycles, and the Common Road video and leader's guide, a useful resource for group presentations. Contact the MSF for more information: http://msf-usa.org. NHTSA supports Motorcyclists Awareness Month--http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/ injury/pedbimot/motorcycle/motorcycle month.html NHTSA's Motorist Awareness Program--http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/ pedbimot/motorcycle/motorcycle03/moto_awareness.htm The Gold Wing Road Riders Association (GWRRA) promotes a motorist awareness program at http://www.gwrra.org/regional/MAD/. Ride to Work (RTW) Organization advocates and supports the use of motorcycles for transportation, and provides information about transportation riding to the public. Every year RTW proclaims one day "Ride to Work Day." RTW encourages: Employer recognition and support for motorcycling Public and government awareness of the positive value of motorcycling For more information, visit: http://www.ridetowork.org/home.php. Websites Motorcyclist Awareness Month NHTSA--http://www.nhtsa.gov/planners/sharetheroad2008/ U.S. Senate (MRF News) http://www.mrf.org/articles/2004/04NR2104nr21ussenate designatesmayasmotorcycleawarenessmonthhousebillintroduced.htm Indiana--http://www.doe.state.in.us/reed/newsr/2007/05-May/motorcycle awareness.html Michigan--http://www.michigan-motorcycle-awareness.org/ Idaho--http://gov.idaho.gov/mediacenter/proc/proc03/procmay/Proc_ motorcycle.htm V-106