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30 Technology- Utilities emissions are reported based on the Stationary Source Specific Emission Fuel Consumption party receiving the invoice for the utility (natu- Factors and Other Data Data as Necessary ral gas, purchased electricity, etc.). Appropriate conversion units may need to be applied de- Calculate pending on the units of the fuel consumption values and the emission factors used. The activity/fuel data should be mul- tiplied by an emission factor. Emission factors can be ob- tained from sources such as the USEPA and EIA. Some ex- Stationary Source GHG Emissions amples of average emission factors are Figure 3-11. Overview of Airport Btu--British thermal units Facility Combustion Method 2. mmBtu--Million Btu TJ--Tera joules calculation procedures as in Method 1 but using technology- GJ--Giga joules specific emission factors as indicated in Figure 3-11. ft3--Cubic feet The stationary source fuel consumption data can be obtained from various fuel purchase or financial records and should be separated by sources owned by the airport operator versus Natural gas (U.S. average) = 53.06 kg CO2/mmBtu fuel those owned by tenants. For locations where purchased nat- (TCRa 2008 and USEPAb 2008), ural gas or electrical records are not absolutely clear as to the Natural gas (U.S. average) = 120.593 lbs CO2/1,000 ft3 fuel quantities that are the responsibility of the airport operator (EIA 2008), versus that of the tenants, the following guidance is provided: Natural gas for commercial/institutional purposes = Any invoices for purchased electricity received by the air- 56,100 kg CO2/TJ fuel (IPCC 2006), port operator, even if directly metered to a tenant, are the Natural gas for commercial/institutional purposes = 5 g responsibility of the airport operator and thus those emis- CH4/GJ fuel (USEPAb 2008), sions should be categorized under the airport-owned cat- Natural gas for commercial/institutional purposes = 0.1 g egory. If invoices are received by the tenant and the airport N2O/GJ fuel (USEPAb 2008), can either gain access to tenant electrical consumption or an Natural gas for commercial/institutional purposes = 5 kg estimate can be made of the tenant electricity/energy usage, the CH4/TJ fuel (IPCC 2006), and associated emissions should be categorized under the "tenant- Natural gas for commercial/institutional purposes = 0.1 kg owned" category. In any case, these emissions should all be in- N2O/TJ fuel (IPCC 2006). cluded as part of an airport GHG inventory. As noted earlier, airport-owned emissions resulting from purchased electricity The following is an example calculation using 200,000 mil- should be classified as Scope 2 emissions, whereas tenant pur- lion therms of natural gas usage: chased electricity should be classified as Scope 3 emissions. Appropriate conversion units may need to be applied de- The 200,000 million therms equates to 20,000 0 mmBtu using a pending on the units of the fuel consumption values and the Btu therm . conversion factor of 0.1 mmB emission factors used. Emission factors can be obtained from sources such as USEPA's Technology Transfer Network (TTN) Therefore, CO2 emissions = ( 20, 000 mmBtu ) (USEPAd 2008), Annex 2 of the USEPA's 2008 GHG inventory (53.06 kg CO2 mmBtu ) = 1.061 million kg CO2 . report (USEPAb 2008) and IPCC Volume 2, Chapter 2 of the This equates to 1,061 metric tons of CO2 when using 2006 guidelines (IPCC 2006). The inventory developer must a conversion factor of 0.001 metric ton kg. make sure to use the appropriate emission factors for each technology and operating condition. 3.5.2 Stationary Source Combustion Activities--Method 2 3.5.3 Electricity Usage (Utility Purchases) In keeping with the IPCC Tier 3 method for stationary This section covers indirect emissions (Scope 2) resulting combustion, the Method 2 presented herein involves the same from electricity used by the airport (electricity not generated