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Workforce Toolkit Use 27 Selecting "add a resource," located above the table, opens a screen with fields for the resource ID, resource title, short description, long description, author, reference, organization, contact information, web site, resource cost and format, resource application, and other resource users (if known). Resource ID numbers must be manually entered; the system will not allow resources with duplicate ID numbers. To determine the next sequential resource ID number, the admin- istrative user must navigate to the last page of the existing resources list. Once the new resource information is entered, the administrative user can add the resource to the database by clicking on "accept" or discard the entry by selecting "cancel." 3.2.2 Edit Resource Facets The Edit Resource Facet page allows the administrative user to add or delete facet types or values associated with a document. Chapter 2.3 of this report explains facets in more detail. Resources can be sorted by title or Resource ID. Selecting the desired resource displays the existing facets for the resource. "Insert" adds the facet; "cancel" discards the new facet and returns the user to the prior screen. Facets can be deleted by selecting "delete" next to the facet to be eliminated for that resource. 3.3 Workforce Toolkit Scenarios The scenarios in this chapter present examples of how the Workforce Toolkit might be used to respond to a typical workforce issue. 3.3.1 Scenario 1--Planning for Loss of Experienced Staff Problem. The Legislature has passed a retirement incentive bill that gives a 6-month window for eligible employees to retire. The state personnel office estimates that about 5% of the highest paid employees will be eligible. Based on their employees' tenure, the DOT knows that up to 19% of their experienced employees could retire. To complicate matters, a major layoff several years earlier due to budget cuts has left the DOT with few employees experienced enough to take the retirees' place if they leave. The DOT's human resources director has been tasked with ensuring the workforce remains sufficient to meet the agency's mission despite these factors. Solution. Assuming that other DOTs must face a similar challenge, the HR director selects Top Ten DOT Needs from the Home view of the Workforce Toolkit (Figure 3.3). After reviewing overviews of the options, she decides to retrieve resources from columns AD (understand issues and trends; learn about peer agencies; asses our situation; and implement programs, policies, and procedures) relating to the following issues: Strategic workforce planning, Attracting and retaining talent, Preparing the next generation of leaders, and Preserving institutional knowledge. Next, the HR director checks the Frequently Asked Question page for additional resources and discovers the question, "A large percentage of our workforce is due to retire over the next 5 years. How do we address this situation?" Selecting that question retrieves titles and short descriptions of useful resources as shown in Figure 3.4. Meanwhile, the human resources director has asked her assistant to find resources using another view in the Workforce Toolkit. The assistant decides to use Faceted Search view. From the main Faceted Search page, the assistant clicks on the drop-down menu for need types and checks recruitment, retention, retirement, knowledge management, training, succession planning, and compensation and benefits as shown in Figure 3.5.

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28 Tools to Aid State DOTs in Responding to Workforce Challenges Figure 3.3. Finding resources from Top Ten DOT Needs View. Figure 3.4. Finding resources by FAQ. Figure 3.5. Finding resources by need type.

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Workforce Toolkit Use 29 Figure 3.6. Finding resources by audience type. Figure 3.7. Finding resources by source type. Next, the assistant selects three audience types: State DOT, Transportation professionals, and human resources as shown in Figure 3.6. For sources of information, the assistant checks TRB/NCHRP/TCRP, journal/publisher, NAPA, state DOT, university research center, national association--transportation, and national association--human resources as shown in Figure 3.7. Next, he must decide which DOT roles will be affected by the Legislature's retirement Figure 3.8. Finding incentive bill and by the impending retirement of experienced employees. Since a workforce resources by DOT role. reduction of this magnitude would be felt throughout the agency, he selects all the options in the DOT role category: Top agency executives (CEOs), senior managers (division chiefs and district administrators), human resources, line managers/workgroup supervisors, and other as shown in Figure 3.8. Finally, he decides on the type of resources needed to address the situation, and elects to search general resources, methodology/guide/model, case studies, and policy/procedure as shown in Figure 3.9. The human resources director and assistant review the list of resources they have gathered, select the most relevant resources, and use the Workforce Toolkit to find the resources they need. To do this, they click on the work's title, which opens a screen containing title, author, short Figure 3.9. Finding description, long description, and additional information--such as an email, phone number, or resources by resource web site--for finding the document as shown in Figure 3.10. type.

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30 Tools to Aid State DOTs in Responding to Workforce Challenges Figure 3.10. Summary view of individual resource. After reviewing the available resources, the HR director can report to management about current practices, policies, and experiences relating to preserving knowledge, identifying and training for competencies, planning for and guiding succession, targeting recruitment strategies, and creating or modifying a workforce human capital plan. 3.3.2 Scenario 2--Attracting Skilled Engineers to Public Sector Jobs Problem. Higher salaries paid by private sector firms make it difficult to recruit engineering technicians. State salary policies limit what the DOT can pay, and traditional sources for new engineering technicians can't educate enough people to supply private sector firms and the DOT. The state DOT director plans to launch initiatives designed to identify competencies, train and develop existing staff, find new ways to recruit engineering technicians, and plan for the future in terms of ensuring that the agency-specific knowledge and skills of current engineering technicians are passed on to new hires. In addition, the DOT director hopes to review data on outsourcing these duties in the event that it becomes necessary. Solution. To educate himself about what other state DOTs and public agencies are doing to recruit and retain qualified engineers, the director first uses the FAQ View in the Workforce Toolkit. There he discovers this question arises frequently in state DOTs; clicking on the question reveals a list of resources. However, the director wants to narrow his search to more specifically address his needs, so he goes to the Full text search view of the Toolkit. Entering "engineers" as a search word retrieves titles and short descriptions that can help Figure 3.11. To learn more about using an engineering consulting firm, he searches on "consultant" (Figure 3.12). To refine his search, the director enters a combination of search words, "engineer training competency" (See Figure 3.13).

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Workforce Toolkit Use 31 Figure 3.11. Finding resources using text search. Figure 3.12. Modifying a text search.

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32 Tools to Aid State DOTs in Responding to Workforce Challenges Figure 3.13. Using multiple search words in text search. 3.3.3 Scenario 3--Attracting Skilled Engineers to Public Sector Jobs Problem. The human resources director has noted a dearth of qualified applicants for entry-level and mid-level positions. Although the volume of applications is high, the recruiting strategies used in the past no longer seem to be attracting the right candidates. Additionally, budget cuts have raised questions about the effectiveness of career fairs, which have been labor-intensive and expensive. The director wants to reassess the agency's mix of advertising, career fairs, and re-hiring practices to use resources more efficiently while drawing a better candidate pool. Solution. Knowing that the experiences of peer organizations will be useful in helping formulate a new recruiting strategy, the human resources director selects the State Practices view of the Workforce Toolkit. The director selects the first option to access NCHRP Project 20-24(40), "Analysis and Benchmarking of Recruitment and Hiring Practices of State Departments of Transportation" (Figure 3.14). This leads to two tables that can be viewed: Effectiveness of Recruiting and Most Successful Practices for Recruiting Employees (Figure 3.15). Selecting the first option reveals a table that shows how states measure the effectiveness of various strategies they employ for recruiting for entry-level and mid-career level employees (Figure 3.16a). The second option provides a state-by-state view of the three most successful strategies used for recruiting entry-level and mid-level employees (Figure 3.16b). Using this information, the human resources director suggests incentive programs for employees suggesting individuals who are ultimately hired by the agency, increasing visibility and accessibility of job postings on the agency web site, and a percentage decrease in the number of job fairs held annually.

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Workforce Toolkit Use 33 Figure 3.14. Finding resources using State Practices View. Figure 3.15. Searching State Practices by study.

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34 Tools to Aid State DOTs in Responding to Workforce Challenges (a) (b) Figure 3.16. State Practices data tables.