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6 14 CFR Part 139, Airport Certification, defines the safety requirements that airports with commercial air carrier service Class IV airport means an airport certificated to serve must meet. This regulation requires certain airports to have unscheduled passenger operations of large air carrier safety areas, aircraft rescue and fire fighting personnel and aircraft. A Class IV airport cannot serve scheduled large equipment, and a self-inspection program, to name a few. or small air carrier aircraft. Although there is reference to access to movement areas by vehicles and pedestrians, it does not, in and of itself, require a driver training program. However, it is generally accepted that the only way to comply with this Part 139 requirement is For example, an airport that receives scheduled passenger to implement a driver training program (see Appendix C for air carrier service with large and small air carrier aircraft Section 139.329). and unscheduled (charter) passenger air carrier service with air carrier aircraft with more than 30 passenger seats is clas- Under Part 139, commercial service airports are classified sified as a Class I airport. An airport that receives scheduled by the type of air carrier service that exists at that airport (see passenger air carrier service with small air carrier aircraft Table 3). To understand the organization of this regulation, and unscheduled (charter) passenger air carrier service with one must understand the differences between large and small air carrier aircraft with more than 30 passenger seats is clas- passenger air carrier aircraft, as defined in Part 139, as well sified as a Class II airport. An airport that receives only as the definition of unscheduled operation. Section 139.5 notes scheduled passenger air carrier service with small air car- that "Air carrier aircraft means an aircraft that is being oper- rier aircraft is classified as a Class III airport. Finally, an air ated by an air carrier and is categorized as either a large air carrier airport that receives only unscheduled air carrier air- carrier aircraft if designed for at least 31 passenger seats or a craft with more than 30 passenger seats is classified as a small air carrier aircraft if designed for more than 9 passenger Class IV airport. seats but less than 31 passenger seats." Unscheduled operation means any common carriage passenger-carrying operation for The Class I, II, and III airports are subject to the require- compensation or hire, using aircraft designed for at least 31 pas- ments of Section 139.329, with such airports required to limit senger seats, conducted by an air carrier for which the departure access to movement areas and safety areas to those vehicles time, departure location, and arrival location are specifically and pedestrians needed for airport operations. These airports negotiated with the customer or the customer's representative. are also required to establish and implement procedures for It also defines the categories of air carrier airports: the safe and orderly access to, and operation in, movement areas and safety areas by pedestrians and ground vehicles, including provisions identifying the consequences of non- compliance with the procedures by an employee, tenant, or Class I airport means an airport certificated to serve contractor. One of the ways that airport operators use to meet scheduled operations of large air carrier aircraft that the requirements of this section is to implement a driver can also serve unscheduled passenger operations of training program. To assist airport operators in developing a large air carrier aircraft and/or scheduled operations driver training program, the FAA issued Advisory Circular of small air carrier aircraft. 150/5210-20, Ground Vehicle Operations on Airports. This circular provides information and encourages airport opera- Class II airport means an airport certificated to serve tors to establish driver training programs on their airports scheduled operations of small air carrier aircraft and for safety and for runway incursion prevention. Title 14 CFR the unscheduled passenger operations of large air car- Part 139, Airport Certification, can be found at: www.faa.gov/ rier aircraft. A Class II airport cannot serve scheduled airports_airtraffic/airports/airport_safety/part139_cert. large air carrier aircraft. Class III airport means an airport certificated to serve NON-MOVEMENT AND MOVEMENT AREAS scheduled operations of small air carrier aircraft. A Class III airport cannot serve scheduled or unsched- Section 139.305 (14 CFR Part 139) defines Movement Area uled large air carrier aircraft. as "an area that means the runways, taxiways, and other areas of an airport that are used for the taxiing, takeoff, and TABLE 3 PART 139 AIRPORT CLASSES Type of Air Carrier Operation Class I Class II Class III Class IV Scheduled Large Air Carrier X Unscheduled Larger Air Carrier X X X Scheduled Small Air Carrier X X X

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7 landing of aircraft, exclusive of loading ramps and aircraft airport operators interpret this to mean that all ramp personnel parking areas." must have initial and recurrent training because they tech- nically have access to the movement areas. Based on the In the Pilot/Controller Glossary of the Aeronautical wording in the preamble to Part 139 and because the regu- Information Manual (2007), Movement Area is defined as lation indicates "personnel who access movement areas" and "the runways, taxiways, and other areas of an airport/heliport not "personnel who have access to the movement areas," which are utilized for taxiing/hover taxiing, air taxiing, take- Section 139.303 applies only to the airport operator's person- off, and landing of aircraft, exclusive of loading ramps and nel. For air carriers' and other tenants' employees who access parking areas. At those airports/heliports with a tower, specific the movement area within their job function, recurrent train- approval for entry onto the movement area must be obtained ing is also not required under Part 139 unless the employee from ATC." performs duties in compliance with the airport's Airport Certification Manual, such as those contracted to perform The same Pilot/Controller Glossary defines non-movement self-inspection. There has been some discussion to amend area as ". . . taxiways and apron (ramp) areas not under the Part 139 to require recurrent training for all personnel (not control of air traffic." just airport operator personnel) that access the movement area. Currently, however, this does not prevent an airport For purposes of this study, then, the movement area of operator from adopting a rule or regulation requiring such an airfield contains the runways, taxiways, and other areas training. under the control of air traffic. Non-movement areas include ramps and aprons and some taxiways not under the control In August 2007, the FAA sponsored a "Call to Action" of air traffic. Letters of Agreement between the airport oper- workshop to improve airport safety resulting from runway ator and the FAA may further define the boundary between incursions. More than 40 leaders of the aviation industry met movement and non-movement areas. and agreed on an ambitious plan that included providing additional airport surface movement training to everyone Based on comments from the topic panel, there appears who works on the airport taxiways, runways, and other oper- to be some confusion as to the requirements for recurrent ational areas. All certificated airports were asked to volun- training for persons authorized only in the non-movement tarily develop plans to require annual recurrent training for area and for persons authorized in the movement area. This all individuals with access to movement areas such as run- confusion stems from the interpretation of Section 139.303, ways and taxiways. According to the FAA Runway Safety Personnel, paragraph (c), which states that each certificate Report (June 2008), 91% of certificated airports agreed to holder must "train all personnel who access movement areas step up to the "Call to Action" challenge. and safety areas and perform duties in compliance with the requirements of the Airport Certification Manual (ACM) and Additionally, the FAA issued a change to AC 150/5210-20, the requirements of this part. This training must be com- Ground Vehicle Operations on Airports, which strongly rec- pleted prior to the initial performance of such duties and at ommends regular recurrent training to all personnel who access least once every 12 consecutive calendar months . . ." Several the movement area.