Cover Image

Not for Sale



View/Hide Left Panel
Click for next page ( 120


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 119
Annotated Bibliography ACRP Publications Ludwig, D.A., C.R. Andrews, N.R. Jester-Ten Veen, and C. Laqui. ACRP Report 1: Safety Management Systems for Airports, Volume 1: Overview. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2007. This report explains what a safety management system (SMS) is and how a systems approach to safety management will benefit both the safety and business aspects of airports. The implementation of SMS represents a change in the safety culture of an organization. In this regard, airport directors and members of their governing boards will find this document particularly useful, because the successful implementation of SMS is dependent on the com- mitment of the highest levels of management. Muia, M.J. ACRP Synthesis of Airport Practice 4: Counting Aircraft Operations at Non-Towered Airports. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2007. This synthesis report identifies and evaluates the different methods used by states, airports, and metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) of counting and estimating aircraft operations at nontowered airports with the goal of identifying best practices. Also identified are new technolo- gies that can be used for these counts and estimates. Information used in this study was acquired through a literature review; a survey distributed to all 50 state aviation agencies and selected air- ports and MPOs; contacts with manufacturers of counting equipment and aviation trade organ- izations; and follow-up telephone interviews and e-mail correspondence, where appropriate. Nichol, C. ACRP Synthesis of Airport Practice 1: Innovative Finance and Alternative Sources of Revenue for Airports. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2007. This synthesis report is intended to inform airport operators, stakeholders, and policymakers about alternative financing options and revenue sources currently available or that could be available in the future in the United States. The report provides a brief overview of common cap- ital funding sources used by airport operators, a review of capital financing mechanisms used by airports, descriptions of various revenue sources developed by airport operators, and a review of privatization options available to U.S. airport operators. Information used in this study was acquired through a review of the literature and interviews with airport operators and industry experts. Spitz, W., and R. Golaszewski. ACRP Synthesis of Airport Practice 2: Airport Aviation Activity Forecasting. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2007. This synthesis report reviews current practices and methods in airport activity forecasting in the United States. The study addresses how airport forecasts are used and identifies com- mon aviation metrics, aviation data sources, issues in data collection and preparation, and spe- cial data issues at nontowered airports. 119

OCR for page 119
120 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports Williams, C. ACRP Synthesis of Airport Practice 3: General Aviation Safety and Security Practices. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2007. This synthesis report identifies current practices in safety and security at general aviation airports. It reviews resources used by the general aviation community in the development of safety and security programs, funding sources, and issues that determine the amount of money spent on such programs and describes current practices that general aviation airports use to keep their facilities safe and secure. Books Albers, S. Strategic Management in the Aviation Industry. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., Burlington, Vt., 2004. This book looks at the strategic challenges facing the aviation industry, in various sectors of aviation management, including but not restricted to passenger planes. It combines views from economic, business, and academic professionals to examine "conceptual predisposi- tions with regard to the industry, the economic and institutional environment, as well as the underlying strategy" of strategic issues relevant to aviation management. de Neufville, R., and A. Odoni. Airport Systems: Planning, Design, and Management, 1st ed. McGraw-Hill Professional, 2003. This book reviews the operations of large- and medium-sized commercial airports. The book is principally targeted toward urban and regional planners and concerns the develop- ment impacts of airport expansion on environmental health and fiscal implications. The text covers all aspects of airport planning, design, and management and is intended for planning practitioners and academic use. Eckrose, R. A., and W. H. Green. How to Assure the Future of Your Airport: Principles of Airport Management and Administration, 3rd ed. Applied Research Associates, Inc., Madison, Wis., 2002. This book discusses 21 topics related to administering a local general aviation airport that is neither large enough nor profitable enough to have a professional staff. The third edition includes chapters on security and land use. Gesell, L. E. The Administration of Public Airports, 4th ed. Coast Aire Publications, Chandler, Ariz., 1999. The "blue book" is intended to prepare students for careers in aviation management and serve as a reference for professional airport managers. The fourth edition contains significant revisions that reflect the changing nature of managing airports in the public sector over the past 20 years. Gesell, L. E. Aviation and the Law, 4th ed. Coast Aire Publications, Chandler, Ariz., 2005. This book provides a basic understanding of law and legal systems and of how the princi- ples of law may be applied to the many aspects of air commerce and air transportation. The fourth edition includes updates on the federal aviation security provisions since September 2001, as well as important court cases decided since the previous edition. Green, W. H. Beginner's Guide to Airport Administration. Hilldale Press, Inc., Madison, Wis., 2002. Based on the book How to Assure the Future of Your Airport, this pocket-sized book pro- vides individuals new to airport management a brief overview of 20 airport administration topics. Hoerter, S. The Airport Management Primer, 2nd ed. S. Hoerter, Mount Pleasant, S.C., 2001. This book focuses on foundational information needed by decision makers and emphasizes strategic concepts rather than day-to-day tactics.

OCR for page 119
Annotated Bibliography 121 Horonjeff, R., and F. X. McKelvey. Planning and Design of Airports, 4th ed. McGraw-Hill Professional, New York, 1994. A guide to the planning, engineering, and design of airports. Includes geometric design infor- mation for airfields as well as statistical and legislative data relating to the development of airports. Rodwell, J. F. Essentials of Aviation Management: A Guide for Aviation Service Businesses. Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, Dubuque, Iowa, 2003. This text introduces small business theory and practices for basic managerial training and fixed-base operations for the U.S. aviation industry service centers. The book reviews business planning, marketing, financial strategies, and human resources, among other top- ics. The book also details flight lines, flight operations, and aviation maintenance activities along with the regulatory reviews associated with the industry. Shahin, M. Y. Pavement Management for Airports, Roads, and Parking Lots. Springer, New York, 2006. This book reviews cost-effective methods for evaluating pavements in addition to describ- ing repair and maintenance techniques. While the book examines the budgetary aspects and practices of pavement management, the text also discusses measuring friction and physical conditions of pavements under stress. Sheehan, J. Business and Corporate Aviation Management: On Demand Air Travel. McGraw-Hill Companies, New York, 2003. This text reviews methods for establishing and operating an aviation operation, particularly targeted toward business and corporate clienteles. The book reviews how companies use air- craft for business, what types of aircraft are most appropriate for certain types of business activities, regulations, scheduling, maintenance, and other necessary operations. Singer, J. Small Airport Management Handbook. Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga., 1985. This book provides an overview of small airport operations and services. The text examines the issues confronted by small airports from an economic perspective. Wells, A., and S. Young. Airport Planning and Management, 5th ed. McGraw-Hill Companies, New York, 2004. This book offers strategic guidance on airport design, access issues, financing, laws and reg- ulations, technology, and other concerns essential to the development and management of airports. The text reviews changes to the airline industry in the postSeptember 2001 era, focusing on how airports have adapted to the new regulations imposed. Wiley, J. R. Airport Administration and Management. Eno Foundation for Transportation, Inc., Westport, Conn., 1986. This report provides real-world perspectives on airport operations, explores the expanded role of today's airport manager resulting from changing conditions and expectations, and presents problem-solving skills to meet present and future service needs. FAA Publications Advisory Circulars FAA advisory circulars can be found online at the FAA website (www.faa.gov/airports_airtraffic/ airports/resources/advisory_circulars). Accounting Records Guide for Airport Aid Program Sponsors, AC 150/5100-10A. FAA, Washington, D.C., April 13, 1976. Sets forth recordkeeping requirements imposed on sponsors of Airport Development Aid Program (ADAP) and Planning Grant Program (PGP) projects funded by the Airport and Airway Development Act of 1970, as amended. In addition, federal regulations require a spon- sor to establish and maintain a financial management system that meets the standards set forth in Part 152, Appendix K. This circular provides detailed explanations of these requirements.

OCR for page 119
122 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports Aircraft Fuel Storage, Handling, and Dispensing on Airports, AC 150/5230-4A. FAA, Washington, D.C., June 18, 2004. Identifies standards and procedures for storage, handling, and dispensing of aviation fuel on airports. Airport Design, AC 150/5300-13 (and Change 11). FAA, Washington, D.C., March 28, 2007. Contains the FAA's standards and recommendations for airport design. Airport Emergency Plan, AC 150/5200-31A. FAA, Washington, D.C., September 30, 1999. Provides guidance for the preparation and implementation of emergency plans at civil airports. Airport Master Plans, AC 150/5070-6B. FAA, Washington, D.C., July 29, 2005. Provides guidance for the preparation of airport master plans that range in size and func- tion from small general aviation to large commercial service facilities. Airport Pavement Management Program, AC 150/5380-7A. FAA, Washington, D.C., September 1, 2006. Discusses the Airport Pavement Management System (APMS) concept, its essential com- ponents, and how it can be used to make cost-effective decisions about pavement maintenance and rehabilitation. Airport Safety Self-Inspection, AC 150/5200-18C. FAA, Washington, D.C., April 23, 2004. Provides information to airport operators about airport self-inspection programs and iden- tifies what should be included in such programs. Airport Snow and Ice Removal Equipment, AC 150/5220-20. FAA, Washington, D.C., March 31, 1994. Provides guidance to airport operators on the procurement of snow and ice control equip- ment for airport use. Airport Winter Safety and Operations, AC 150/5200-30A. FAA, Washington, D.C., October 1, 1991, amended February 3, 2005. Provides guidance to help airport owners/operators develop an acceptable airport snow and ice control program and implement appropriate field condition reporting procedures. Architectural, Engineering, and Planning Consultant Services for Airport Grant Projects, AC 150/5100-14D. FAA, Washington, D.C., September 30, 2005. Provides guidance for airport sponsors in the selection and employment of architectural, engineering, and planning consultants under FAA airport grant programs. Citizen Participation in Airport Planning, AC 150/5050-4. FAA, Washington, D.C., September 26, 1975. Provides guidance for citizen involvement in airport planning. Although not mandatory for airport grant programs, it explains the need for early citizen participation. Civil Rights Requirements for the Airport Improvement Program, AC 150/5100-15A. FAA, Washington, D.C., March 31, 1989. Encompasses the basic civil rights requirements for the Airport Improvement Program (AIP). The AC is intended for sponsors using program assistance and for contractors and sub- contractors working on projects under the program. Debris Hazards at Civil Airports, AC 150/5380-5B. FAA, Washington, D.C., July 5, 1996. Discusses problems of debris at airports, gives information on foreign objects, and tells how to eliminate such objects from operational areas. It also addresses the acquisition of power sweepers for foreign object damage/debris (FOD) control at airports. Exclusive Rights at Federally Obligated Airports, AC 150/5190-6. FAA, Washington, D.C., January 4, 2007. Provides basic information about the FAA's prohibition on the granting of exclusive rights at federally obligated airports. This prohibition is one of the obligations assumed by the air- port sponsors of public airports that have accepted federal assistance in the form of grants or property conveyances. This AC cancels AC 150/5190-5 (Change 1), Exclusive Rights and Minimum Standards for Commercial Aeronautical Activities, dated June 10, 2002.

OCR for page 119
Annotated Bibliography 123 Fire Department Responsibility in Protecting Evidence at the Scene of an Aircraft Accident, AC 150/5200-12B. FAA, Washington, D.C., September 3, 1999. Furnishes general guidance for an airport, employees, airport management, and other per- sonnel responsible for firefighting and rescue operations at the scene of an aircraft accident. Ground Vehicle Operations on Airports, AC 150/5210-20. FAA, Washington, D.C., June 21, 2002. Contains guidance to airport operators on developing ground vehicle operation training programs. Guide for Airport Financial Reports Filed by Airport Sponsors, AC 150/5100-19C. FAA, Washington, D.C., January 15, 2003, amended April 19, 2004. Provides airport sponsors with guidance for complying with the airport financial reporting requirements. Guidelines and Procedures for Maintenance of Airport Pavements, AC 150/5380-6A. FAA, Washington, D.C., July 14, 2003. Provides guidelines and procedures for maintenance of rigid and flexible airport pave- ments. Hazardous Wildlife Attractants on or near Airports, AC 150/5200-33A. FAA, Washington, D.C., July 27, 2004. Provides guidance on locating certain land uses that have the potential to attract hazardous wildlife to or in the vicinity of public-use airports. Labor Requirements for the Airport Improvement Program (AIP), AC 150/5100-6D. FAA, Washington, D.C., October 15, 1986. Encompasses the basic labor and associated requirements for the airport grant program. It is intended for sponsors using program assistance and for contractors and subcontractors working on projects under the program. Land Acquisition and Relocation Assistance for Airport Improvement Program Assisted Projects, AC 150/5100-17. FAA, Washington, D.C., November 7, 2005. Provides guidance to sponsors of airport projects developed under the Airport Improvement Program (AIP) to meet the requirements of the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (PL 91-646, as amended) and the Regulations of the Office of the Secretary of Transportation, 49 CFR Part 24. Maintenance of Airport Visual Aid Facilities, AC 150/5340-26A. FAA, Washington, D.C., April 4, 2005. Provides recommended guidelines for maintenance of airport visual aid facilities. Minimum Standards for Commercial Aeronautical Activities, AC 150/5190-7. FAA, Washington, D.C., August 28, 2006. Provides basic information about the FAA's recommendations on commercial minimum standards and related policies. Although minimum standards are optional, the FAA highly recommends their use and implementation as a means to minimize the potential for viola- tions of federal obligations at federally obligated airports. This AC cancels AC 150/5190-5 (Change 1), Exclusive Rights and Minimum Standards for Commercial Aeronautical Activities, dated June 10, 2002. A Model Zoning Ordinance to Limit Height of Objects Around Airports, AC 150/5190-4A. FAA, Washington, D.C., December 14, 1987. Provides a model zoning ordinance to be used as a guide to control the height of objects around airports. Noise Control and Compatibility Planning for Airports, AC 150/5020-1. FAA, Washington, D.C., August 5, 1983. Provides general guidance for noise control and compatibility planning for airports as well as specific guidance for preparation of airport noise exposure maps and airport noise compat- ibility programs by airport operators for submission under Code of Federal Regulations, Title 14, Part 150, and the Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act of 1979. Contains an expanded Table of Land Uses Normally Compatible with Various Levels of Noise.

OCR for page 119
124 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) for Airport Operators, AC 150/5200-28C. FAA, Washington, D.C., July 24, 2006. Provides guidance on using the NOTAM system for airport condition reporting. Operational Safety on Airports During Construction, AC 150/5370-2E. FAA, Washington, D.C., January 17, 2003. Provides guidance on operational safety on airports: with special emphasis on safety dur- ing periods of construction activity: to assist airport operators in complying with FAR Part 139, Certification of Airports. Painting, Marking, and Lighting of Vehicles Used on an Airport, AC 150/5210-5B. FAA, Washington, D.C., July 11, 1986. Provides guidance, specifications, and standards in the interest of airport personnel safety and operational efficiency for painting, marking, and lighting of vehicles operating in the air- port air operations areas. Proposed Construction or Alteration of Objects that May Affect the Navigable Airspace, AC 70/7460- 2K. FAA, Washington, D.C., March 1, 2000. Provides information to persons proposing to erect or alter an object that may affect the nav- igable airspace. It also explains the requirement to notify the FAA before construction begins and the FAA's responsibility to respond to these notices in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 14, Part 77, Objects Affecting Navigable Airspace. Additionally, the AC explains the process by which to petition the FAA's administrator for discretionary review of the determinations issued by the FAA. Recommended Standard Traffic Patterns and Practices for Aeronautical Operations at Airports Without Operating Control Towers, AC 90/66A. FAA, Washington, D.C., August 26, 1993. Calls attention to regulatory requirements and recommended procedures for aeronauti- cal operations at airports without operating control towers. It recommends traffic patterns and operational procedures for aircraft, lighter than air, glider, parachute, rotorcraft, and ultralight vehicle operations where such use is not in conflict with existing procedures at those airports. Reporting Wildlife Aircraft Strikes, AC 150/5200-32A. FAA, Washington, D.C., December 22, 2004. Explains the importance of reporting collisions between aircraft and wildlife, more com- monly referred to as wildlife strikes. It also covers recent improvements in the FAA's Bird/Other Wildlife Strike Reporting System, how to report a wildlife strike, what happens to the wildlife strike report data, how to access the FAA National Wildlife Aircraft Strike Database, and the FAA's Feather Identification program. Standards for Airport Markings, AC 150/5340-1J. FAA, Washington, D.C., April 29, 2005. Describes the standards for markings used on airport runways, taxiways, and aprons. Standards for Airport Sign Systems, AC 150/5340-18D. FAA, Washington, D.C., December 6, 2004. Incorporates new mandatory hold signs that reflect changed standards for the Precision Obstacle Free Zone (POFZ) and Category (CAT II/III) operations. These changes correspond to revisions to FAA AC 150/5300-13, Airport Design, that change the Precision Object Free Area (POFA) to the POFZ and incorporate new separation standards for taxiways that paral- lel runways used for certain low visibility operations. This AC cancels AC 150/5340-18C, Standards for Airport Sign Systems, dated July 31, 1991. Standards for Specifying Construction of Airports, AC 150/5370-10B. FAA, Washington, D.C., April 25, 2005. Provides standards for the construction of airports. Items covered include general provi- sions, earthwork, flexible base courses, rigid base courses, flexible surface courses, rigid pave- ment, fencing, drainage, turfing, and lighting installation.

OCR for page 119
Annotated Bibliography 125 Airport Orders Airport Capital Improvement Plan. FAA, Washington, D.C., August 22, 2000. www.faa.gov/ airports_airtraffic/airports/resources/publications/orders/media/AIP_5100_39A.pdf This order prescribes the development of the national Airports Capital Improvement Plan (ACIP). The ACIP serves as the primary planning tool for systematically identifying, priori- tizing, and assigning funds to critical airport development and associated capital needs for the national airspace system (NAS). The ACIP also serves as the basis for the distribution of grant funds under the Airport Improvement Program (AIP). By identifying and investing in airport development and capital needs, the FAA can assure the American public that the NAS is a safe, secure, and efficient environment for air travel nationwide. Airport Compliance Requirements. FAA, Washington, D.C., October 2, 1989. www.faa.gov/ airports_airtraffic/airports/resources/publications/orders/media/Obligations_5190_6a.pdf This order provides the policies and procedures to be followed in carrying out the FAA's functions related to airport compliance. It may be of interest to those government agencies, both federal and state, concerned with actions associated with federal and personal property. Airport Improvement Program Handbook. FAA, Washington, D.C., June 28, 2005. www.faa.gov/ airports_airtraffic/airports/aip/aip_handbook/ This order provides guidance and sets forth policy and procedures to be used in the admin- istration of the Airport Improvement Program. Several FAA orders and advisory circulars are referred to in this directive. The references appear as the basic publication number without any suffix. However, the latest issuance of the publication should be used as the reference. Land Acquisition and Relocation Assistance for Airport Projects. FAA, Washington, D.C., August 1, 2005. www.faa.gov/airports_airtraffic/airports/resources/publications/orders/media/ environmental_5100_37b.pdf This order provides guidelines and identifies responsibilities for FAA acceptance and mon- itoring of airport sponsor compliance with provisions of the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act (Uniform Act) (42 USC 4601 et seq.), as amended, on airport projects receiving federal financial assistance. This order incorporates all applica- ble requirements as provided in the Uniform Act implementing regulation 49 CFR Part 24, Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition for Federal and Federally Assisted Programs (Federal Register 70, No. 590, January 4, 2005, and as may be amended). National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Instructions for Airport Projects. FAA, Washington, D.C., April 28, 2006. www.faa.gov/airports_airtraffic/airports/resources/ publications/orders/environmental_5050_4/ This order provides information to FAA Office of Airports personnel and others interested in fulfilling NEPA requirements for airport actions under the FAA's authority. This order is part of FAA's effort to ensure its personnel have clear instructions to address potential envi- ronmental effects resulting from major airport actions. In preparing FAA Order 5050.4B, the Office of Airports has made it consistent with FAA Order 1050.1E.2. Information on federal environmental laws other than NEPA appears in another document titled An Environmental Desk Reference for Airport Actions. The Office of Airports will publish notices in the Federal Register announcing the Desk Reference's availability. Passenger Facility Charge. FAA, Washington, D.C., August 9, 2001. www.faa.gov/airports_ airtraffic/airports/resources/publications/orders/media/PFC_55001.pdf. This order provides guidance and procedures to be used by FAA personnel in the adminis- tration of the Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) Program. The guidance and procedures reflect established FAA practices that have successfully met the statutory and regulatory requirements of the PFC Program. The guidance and procedures are current as of the date of issuance of this order and incorporate all changes to the PFC Program introduced by the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment and Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR 21), as well as prior legislation.

OCR for page 119
126 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports In addition, this order references several other FAA orders and advisory circulars. The references are made using the latest publication numbers for such documents as of the date of issuance of this order. However, in cases where a referenced document is updated fol- lowing the issuance of this order, the latest official release of the document should be used as the reference. Procedures for Conducting Investigations of Vehicle/Pedestrian Deviations. FAA, Washington, D.C., April 28, 2004. www.faa.gov/airports_airtraffic/airports/resources/publications/orders/ media/Safety_5200_10.pdf This order establishes procedures for and information on conducting investigations of vehicle/pedestrian deviations and on completing FAA Form 8020-25, Investigation of Vehicle or Pedestrian Deviation (V/PD) Report (Appendix A). Runway Safety Area Program. FAA, Washington, D.C., October 1, 1999. www.faa.gov/airports_ airtraffic/airports/resources/publications/orders/media/Construction_5200_8.pdf This order establishes the FAA's Runway Safety Area (RSA) Program and the procedures that FAA employees will follow in implementing that program. Other Publications Aeronautical Information Manual: Official Guide to Basic Flight Information and ATC Procedures. FAA, Washington, D.C., March 15, 2007. www.faa.gov/airports_airtraffic/air_ traffic/publications/ATpubs/AIM State Department of Transportation Publications Arizona Best Practices Guide. Arizona Department of Transportation, Phoenix, 2007. www. azairports.org/bestpracticesguide.php The purpose of this guide is to clarify roles, responsibilities, and expectations of all affected parties when conducting airport-related business within the state of Arizona. The Best Practices Guide is also intended to ensure that airport issues are dealt with in a uniform man- ner. Although this publication is specific to Arizona, the topics and information are germane to all airports. In addition, this guide may survive as a model for other airport organizations in developing best practice guides. Michigan Department of Transportation Aeronautics. Airport Manager Examination Study Guide. Michigan Department of Transportation, Lansing, Mich., 2004. www.michigan.gov/ documents/studyguide_18131_7.pdf As the title indicates, the purpose of this publication is to assist airport manager candidates in preparing for the state licensure examination. Although much of the information is specific to Michigan (e.g., sections of the Michigan Aeronautics Code are often referenced), all airport managers should have knowledge of the subjects covered by the study guide for their own states. New York State Airport Managers' Handbook. New York State Department of Transportation, Albany, N.Y., 2001. www.nysdot.gov/portal/page/portal/divisions/operating/opdm/aviation/ repository/files/nys_airport_ managers_handbook.pdf This comprehensive handbook was prepared by the New York State Aviation Services Bureau in association with the New York Aviation Management Association to assist airport managers in making informed decisions on airport-related issues. The topics addressed in the handbook were selected based on feedback from airport managers in New York State. Each chapter of the handbook was written by an airport manager or subject matter expert. Although the handbook was written for New York airports, the topics are relevant to airports nation-

OCR for page 119
Annotated Bibliography 127 wide. In addition, the handbook addresses many issues over which a federal agency has juris- diction, so much of the information provided may be useful for all airports. NewMyer, D. A. and C. B. Seibert. Airport Commissioner's Handbook. Illinois Department of Transportation, Springfield, Ill., 2000. This publication was prepared by the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale under con- tract to the Illinois Department of Transportation, Division of Aeronautics. The handbook addresses a broad range of topics relevant to airport commission members, including the role of airport commissioners, airport rules and regulations, airport facilities, and airport finance. While some of the information is specific to Illinois, the handbook provides an outline of the issues on which airport managers must educate airport commissioners. NewMyer, D. A., et al. Airport Manager's Handbook. Illinois Department of Transportation, Springfield, Ill., 2001. This comprehensive handbook was prepared by Southern Illinois University at Carbondale under contract to the Illinois Department of Transportation, Division of Aeronautics. A variety of topics including airport control and ownership, operating and maintaining a safe airport, airport planning and finance, airport design standards, com- patible land uses, and airport revenue generation are covered. The handbook also includes samples of various types of documents including the airport manager's agreement, fixed- base operator agreement, and lease agreement. Some of the information in the handbook is specific to Illinois, but the topics and majority of the information are relevant to all air- ports. This handbook is not available online. Ohio Airport Handbook. Ohio Department of Transportation, Columbus, Ohio, 1999. This comprehensive handbook contains sections on operating and managing a safe air- port, developing airport facilities, state and federal grants, airport design, standards, leases, and community relations. The introduction includes brief descriptions of each chapter in the handbook. Some portions of the handbook are specific to Ohio airports, but there is valuable information for airport managers throughout the United States, especially the templates and sample documents. This handbook is not available online. Trade Publications Airport Business. Cygnus Publishing, Fort Atkinson, Wis. Airport Business is the most widely circulated and audited business publication, targeting professionals who manage airports, airport-based businesses, and corporate flight facilities. Published 11 times annually, the magazine attempts to help managers run their operations more effectively by sharing case studies as well as providing expert analysis, industry news, and product information. Current issue articles are available through the magazine's website at www.airportbusiness.com. Airport Magazine. AAAE Service Corporation, Inc., Alexandria, Va. This bi-monthly publication of the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE) is geared toward larger airports, but each issue contains a section on general aviation and other information that may be of value to smaller airports. Subscriptions are available without join- ing AAAE. Centerlines. Naylor, LLC, Gainesville, Fla. The content of this quarterly publication of Airports Council InternationalNorth America (ACI-NA) is geared more towards larger airports. However, most issues include articles about national policy and/or legislative issues that may affect all airports. Free PDF versions of the magazine are available through the ACI-NA website (www.aci-na.org).

OCR for page 119
128 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports TSA Publications Security Guidelines for General Aviation Airports. Transportation Security Administration, Washington, D.C., May 2004. www.tsa.gov/assets/pdf/security_guidelines_for_general_ aviation_airports.pdf This document is intended to provide general aviation airport owners, operators, and users with guidelines and recommendations that address aviation security concepts, technology, and enhancements. To date, this document is the primary published guidance on general avi- ation airport security. The TSA anticipates updating this document on an as-needed basis.