TABLE 9 Agents Grouped According to Importance as Causes of Natural Respiratory Disease

Groupª

Mouseb

Ratb

I

Sendai virus

Mycoplasma pulmonis

 

Mycoplasma pulmonis

Sendai virus

 

 

CAR bacillus

 

 

Streptococcus pneumoniae

 

 

Corynebacterium kutscheri

II

Pneumonia virus of mice

Rat coronavirus

 

Pneumocystis carinii

Sialodacryoadenitis virus

 

Mycohaterium avium-intracellulare

Pneumonia virus of mice

 

Chlamydia trachomatis

Pneumocystis carinii

 

Klebsiella pneumoniae

Klebsiella pneumoniae

 

Streptococcus pyogenes

Mycoplasma collis

 

Mycoplasma neurolyticum

 

 

Mycoplasma collis

 

 

K virus

 

III

Corynebacterium kutscheri

Pasteurella pneumotropica

 

Chlamydia psittaci

Bordetella bronchiseptica

 

Pasteurella pneumotropica

Adenovirus

 

Bordetella bronchiseptica

 

 

Adenovirus

 

a Group Key:

I = Agents that are unquestionably important respiratory tract pathogens.

II = Agents of questionable importance or pathogenicity as respiratory tract pathogens, except in special circumstances.

III = Agents that are not primary respiratory tract pathogens in the species indicated.

b Reading down each list of agents for the mouse or rat, agents are listed approximately in descending order of importance as respiratory pathogens for that rodent species.

the most important in the rat and Sendai virus the most important in the mouse. In actual practice, however, severe natural respiratory disease in the rat usually is due to M. pulmonis in combination with Sendai virus and/ or the cilia-associated respiratory (CAR) bacillus. In the mouse, combined infections of Sendai virus and M. pulmonis are responsible for the most severe outbreaks of natural respiratory disease, although Sendai virus infection alone also can cause severe disease when first introduced into a naive population of genetically susceptible mice. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Corynebacterium kutscheri are potent respiratory pathogens in the rat but seldom in the absence of some combination involving M. pulmonis, Sendai virus, and/or CAR bacillus.

The agents listed in group II of Table 9 are relatively unimportant as natural respiratory pathogens in comparison to those of group I. Some of



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