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41 APPENDIX E Descriptions of School Bus Types Descriptions and pictures retrieved from http://www.stnonline.com/stn/faq/schoolbustypes.htm The Type A school bus consists of a bus body constructed upon a cutaway front-section vehicle with a left side driver's door, designed for carrying more than 10 persons. This definition includes two classifications: Type A-I, with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of 10,000 pounds or less, and a Type A- 2, with a GVWR of 10,000 pounds or more. Type A school buses meet all Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards for school buses. The Type B school bus consists of a bus body constructed and installed on a front-section vehicle chassis, or stripped chassis, with a GVWR of more than 10,000 pounds, designed for carrying more than 10 persons. Part of the engine is beneath and/or behind the windshield and beside the driver's seat. The entrance door is behind the front wheels. Type B school buses meet all Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards for school buses.

OCR for page 40
42 The Type C school bus, also known as a "conventional," is a body installed upon a flat-back cowl chassis with a GVWR of more than 10,000 pounds, designed for carrying more than 10 persons. The entire engine is in front of the windshield and the entrance door is behind the front wheels. Type C school buses meet all Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards for school buses. The Type D school bus, also known as a transit-style, is a body installed upon a chassis, with the engine mounted in the front, mid-ship, or rear with a GVWR of more than 10,000 pounds, and designed for carrying more than 10 persons. The engine may be behind the windshield and beside the driver's seat; it may be at the rear of the bus, behind the rear wheels; or mid-ship between the front and rear axles. The entrance door is ahead of the front wheels. Type D school buses meet all Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards for school buses. [Editor's note: Type D school buses are referred to as RE for "rear- engine," and FC for "forward control."] Type III vehicles are standard passenger vehicles, such as cars, small vans, SUVs, or station wagons.