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110 Marketing Guidebook for Small Airports Exhibit 11.15--Cost of Multi-Media. Cost of Multi-Media $ $$ $$$ In-House Radio Ads Radio Ads Television Ads & Video Streaming Commercially Produced Commercially Produced Source: Oliver Wyman Radio production costs can be very inexpensive if they are developed in-house. They are more expensive if done by a production company. The basic components of radio production include writing a script and then recording the script and sound effects. Radio ads are typically sold as 30-second spots. Television ads are much more expensive to produce and broadcast. Again, a script is required that includes sound and visual imagery that is roughed-out using a storyboard. If a television ad is part of the airport's cam- paign, we recommend using a production company that can assist in putting together a professional looking and effective television ad. However, videos can be made inexpensively in-house with the use of digital video equipment that can either be purchased or rented. Exhibit 11.15 displays the relative cost of these various forms of advertising. The cost to air a radio or television ad is highly variable and negotiable. If the airport is placing its own ads, there are websites on the Internet that estimate radio and television advertising rates by state, by city, and by radio or television station. These are good starting points for any direct negotiations with a station. 11.5 INTERNET AND WEBSITE TOOLS Internet and website technology continues to evolve at a rapid pace as new advertising and marketing appli- cations are introduced. The Internet provides airports with a very inexpensive and effective means to advertise (see Exhibit 11.16). With an interesting and current website, airports can reach a very large audience. In fact, some airports use all their advertising to direct people back to their website. Also, it is easy to create recipro- cal links on other websites that will take Internet users immediately to the airport's website. Airports can also communicate effectively with specific groups by sending e-blasts via email. This section focuses on the basic ways for airports to make good use of the Internet: 1. Develop a stand-alone website. 2. Establish reciprocal links to/from other related websites of interest to your users. 3. Optimize search engine visibility to increase the airport's position and presence on the Internet. 4. Try video streaming to advertise the airport and make the website visually exciting. 5. Use e-newsletters, e-blasts, and rich site summary (RSS) feed to communicate with target groups.

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Advertising Tools 111 Exhibit 11.16--Internet Opportunities. Internet Opportunities Links to Airport Website Streaming Video Other Websites E-Newsletters & Search Engines RSS Feed E-Blasts Source: KRAMER aerotek, inc. 11.5.1 AIRPORT WEBSITE Effectiveness Cost Commercial Service General Aviation Essential Tool $-$$$ Definition: Airport websites may be thought of either as (1) an electronic marketing brochure or (2) as a content-driven public service or advertising tool. If a website serves as a brochure, it is like an extended business card, containing basic information about the airport, its facilities, location, purpose, and contact information. This is the simplest form of website that an air- port can create in-house or with the help of an intern or the local college. The maintenance required for this type of site is low and its utility as an advertising tool is also minimal. Every airport should at least have this type of presence on the Internet. Websites that are content driven raise the bar of opportunity and overhead because they must also be main- tained. If the airport intends to use its website for any of the following reasons: (1) as a principal channel of pub- lic information; (2) to publish schedules and flight status; or (3) to competitively position the airport, then this is a more complex and expensive website to create and keep current. Since the general public has become sophisticated Internet users, a stand-alone content-driven website is an excellent and cost-effective way to advertise the airport. 11.5.2 GENERAL PRINCIPLES FOR AIRPORT ADVERTISING ON THE INTERNET Infuse websites with interesting content. Add or rotate visuals, videos, and information. Keep your website accurate and current. Internet advertising presents the opportunity to reinforce the airport brand and messages through use of logo, color, and taglines. Obtain permission from recipients before sending e-blasts, e-newsletters, or RSS feed.

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112 Marketing Guidebook for Small Airports Separate the airport website from city or county websites. If your airport uses its website to deliver con- tent, it is important that the website be available and not buried as a department within the local gov- ernment website. As a stand-alone website, viewers can easily locate it with an Internet search engine and one click. 11.5.3 REMEMBER THE IMPORTANCE OF ATTRACTING VISITORS TO THE WEBSITE Small airport websites are not a natural destination for many Internet users, so it is important to think of ways to make travelers, general aviation pilots, and others want to use the local airport site. For example, these sites can become a destination if there is a contest that requires a visit or if the site contains important real-time infor- mation. Some commercial airports report arrivals and departures of aircraft, wait times to clear security, and parking availability on a real-time basis. Smaller airport websites frequently post news about new service, airport construction, airport business oppor- tunities, and links to airport-related businesses, such as rental cars and hotels. General aviation sites can post fuel prices and event announcements. The idea is to think of useful or interesting information that can be found only on the airport website, or can be found most easily there so that the airport website becomes a regular site for the user to visit. Pennsylvania developed a program called IFlyPA, which used billboards, luggage tags, radio commercials, and over a million stuffers in auto registration renewals to encourage travelers to check the website, which in turn linked to local airports (see Exhibit 11.17). Exhibit 11.17--IFlyPA Promotion. Source: Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, http://www.iflypa.com In summary, the need to raise awareness of the airport's website can be as much of a challenge as the need to raise awareness of the airport, and many of the same techniques are required. In addition, once the Internet user tries the airport website, he or she may not return if the original visit is a disappointment. Airport websites are both an important marketing tool and a tool that needs to be marketed.

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Advertising Tools 113 11.5.4 GETTING STARTED WITH YOUR WEBSITE It is important to decide at the beginning what type of website the airport will have and what resources are avail- able to maintain it. Many airports use the local college or their existing advertising agency to create a website. Here are a few tips. Domain Name. If you are establishing a stand-alone website for the first time, the airport will need a domain name or Internet address. Simplicity works. Go for the airport name or three letter airport code. Go to an Internet domain register site such as Register.com or GoDaddy.com and confirm that your name is unique. Get the domain name registered. Internet Host. Contact the city or county IT department to find out who hosts its website. The airport can probably use the same company. Basic Website Content. Brainstorm about content. Look at other airport websites. Basic information includes the following: Description of the airport facilities and location Services and amenities Directory of businesses on the airport Lease or development opportunities Rates and charges. Minimum standards Contact information Additional Website Content. The following list contains additional content for the website: Air service schedules Flight status Links to air carriers serving the airport Press kit and press releases Video streaming content (e.g., about the airport or development opportunities) E-newsletters Statistics Financial reports Testimonials Exhibits 11.18 and 11.19 show two examples of home pages for airports. There are many other good ones. Chandler Municipal Airport's website is embedded in the city's website. It is a good example of a brochure type website with good content and several pages of linked information. Although considerable effort went into the development of the website, most of the content will stay current for awhile. This will reduce the regular main- tenance requirements necessary for a website that displays real-time information and rotating content.

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114 Marketing Guidebook for Small Airports Exhibit 11.18--Website for Chandler Municipal Airport, Arizona. Source: City of Chandler, Municipal Airport, http://www.chandleraz.gov/default.aspx?pageid=318 The second example is Natrona County International Airport in Casper, Wyoming. Casper serves as the sec- ond largest airport in Wyoming, and the Casper website offers a current schedule of daily departures. The web- site also provides direct links to airline, car rental, and hotel reservation sites.

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Advertising Tools 115 Exhibit 11.19--Natrona County International Airport Website. Source: Website prepared by Big Wind Media, Inc., for Casper/Natrona County International Airport, http://www.iflycasper.com 11.5.5 DYNAMIC AND PASSIVE LINKS ARE IMPORTANT Links on an airport website can provide direct access to the following: 1. Airline reservation systems 2. Weather conditions 3. Flight status

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116 Marketing Guidebook for Small Airports 4. Businesses on or off the airport. 5. Other aviation organizations or sources of information Companies that provide real-time flight tracking displays and current weather conditions typically require sub- scriptions. Passive links to airlines and travel agencies are arranged by written agreement and are usually free. There is another direction to links that enable an airport to bring viewers into the website. The idea is to create pathways back to your site by including links on other sites that the airport's audience visits such as the local chamber of commerce or the city's website. Best practice is to offer a reciprocal agreement, that is, you include their link or advertisement on your site and they include your link and banner on their site, as illustrated in Exhibit 11.20. Links have the following important advantages: Increase "traffic" into your website Improve your website's search engine ranking Promote partnership with airport stakeholders Are free Exhibit 11.20--Examples of Reciprocal Airport Website Links. Airport Operators Chamber of State DOT Association Commerce Airport Website City or County Local or Regional FBOs & Other Website Economic Development Airport Tenants Source: KRAMER aerotek, inc. 11.5.6 BUYING INTERNET VISIBILITY Internet visibility is important, and there is a whole industry that supports this highly technical subject. One goal of website design is to make sure that the content is search engine friendly. Most web designers understand how to optimize web content and the HTML code (that drives the website) so that the relevant key words are picked up by search engines. When a new website is launched it is important to measure website traffic. There are methods to collect this information and optimize keywords so that search engines deliver the intended vis- itors to your website. It is also possible to purchase higher rankings on all the search engines (and there are many today). However, before purchasing advertising on the Internet, airports would be wiser to first optimize their websites to become search engine friendly as the website is developed or reworked.

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Advertising Tools 117 11.5.7 E-NEWSLETTER, E-BLASTS, AND RSS FEED E-newsletters, e-blasts, and RSS feed are all ways to communicate with stakeholders, tenants, prospects, and other interested people. Think of these three media as going from the most formal presentation to newsbyte links. Many airports already produce newsletters, press releases, and other streams of information that are pub- lished as hard copy, loaded onto a website, or distributed via email or a desktop browser. E-newsletters are electronic versions of 1 to 4 page newsletters typically published monthly or quarterly. They were one of the first formats to go electronic on a website where a visitor could view them on the website or sign up for delivery via email. E-newsletters are the most formal of the electronic communications that airports disseminate. See discussion of print and electronic newsletters in Section 10.7.2. E-blasts are sent via email to a target audience. They are typically limited to a single, important subject that would interest the recipient. For example, suppose the airport began offering free wireless Internet. This news could be broadcast on the website or a special email could be sent out to airport users. If an airport uses e-blasts frequently, it may be important to make special arrangements with the airport's email provider to avoid problems that arise out of mass mailings and spam filters. RSS feed is the newest technology of the three. RSS is a format for delivering regularly changing web content. Many news-related sites, weblogs and airports syndicate their content as an RSS feed to whoever wants it. RSS solves a problem for people who regularly visit several websites. The user subscribes to a feed typically on a website or by clicking an RSS icon in a browser that initiates the subscription process. An RSS reader or browser checks the user's subscribed feeds regularly for new content, downloading any updates that it finds. Some browsers have feed readers built into them. Airports are starting to use RSS feed. Exhibit 11.21 contains Centennial Airport's invitation to subscribe. Exhibit 11.21--RSS News Feeds for Centennial Airport, Colorado. Keep in touch with what s happening at the airport. Get the latest news delivered directly to you via our RSS Feeds. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR FEEDS: LATEST NEWS PILOT NEWS NOISE ABATEMENT NEWS SUBSCRIBE SUBSCRIBE SUBSCRIBE Latest News Pilot News Noise News Source: Centennial Airport, http://www.centennialairport.com/centenn4/News-Feeds

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118 Marketing Guidebook for Small Airports 11.5.8 WEBSITE COSTS There are a number of cost components associated with development and maintenance of a website: 1. Domain registration and annual fee 2. Internet host fee 3. Development of the website structure and appearance 4. Website maintenance 5. On-going content development Exhibit 11.22--Relative Costs of Internet Presence. Relative Costs of Internet Presence $ $$ $$$ Brochure Type Website Content Driven Websites Content Driven Websites with Reciprocal Links with Dynamic Links E-Blasts E-Newsletters Paid for Search Engine Viability RSS Feed Source: KRAMER aerotek, inc. The cost of a website will vary widely, depending on what the airport decides to accomplish (see Exhibit 11.22). The following are three important questions to ask: What is the purpose of the airport website: brochure or dynamic content? What resources are available to design and maintain the content or the website? What outside resources are required?