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OCR for page 19
Scope of Your Marketing Plan 19 Exhibit 3.9--Marketing Goals and Objectives Worksheet. Airport's Most Important Marketing Goal SMART objectives to achieve this goal in the next 12 months: 1.1: 1.2: Airport's Second Most Important Goal SMART objectives to achieve this goal: 2.1: 2.2: 2.3: Additional Goals and Objectives as needed. Source: KRAMER aerotek, inc. 3.5 RESEARCH FINDINGS: MARKETING GOALS REPORTED BY AIRPORT MANAGERS For those readers interested in more ideas about marketing goals, this section contains findings from research completed for this project. Managers of small commercial service airports and general aviation airports were asked to rank a set of airport marketing goals that they thought were important. Twelve commercial service air- ports and sixteen general aviation airports were interviewed. COMMERCIAL SERVICE AIRPORTS--MARKETING GOALS Nearly all commercial service airports reported that their primary marketing goals--in terms of impor- tance, time devoted, and money spent--related to air service development. Improving air service, attracting passengers, and retaining existing carriers are the three primary marketing goals of small commercial service airports. In connection with air service, a number of airports said specifically that raising "awareness" in the region was their primary focus. In other words, many area residents did not know that their local air- port offered commercial air service, or assumed that the local service was not competitive with that offered at larger airports. The more general goal of promoting a positive view of the airport in the community is considered of equal importance to air service development, but is not ranked as high in terms of time devoted or money spent. The marketing goals ranking next in importance are (a) attracting new businesses to the airport and (b) attracting more general aviation. Slightly more airports placed greater importance on lobbying their congressional delegations than on attracting developers to the airport. This is likely to be a function of airports seeking help with Essential Air Service issues or federal grants (see Exhibit 3.10).

OCR for page 19
20 Marketing Guidebook for Small Airports Exhibit 3.10--Marketing Goals Reported by Commercial Service Airports. Attract passengers Promote positive view of airport in the community Improve air service Retain existing carriers Attract new businesses to the airport Attract more general aviation or business activity Lobby congressional delegation Attract developers to the airport Address public safety, noise & land use issues Market hangars 0 5 10 15 Number of Airports Reporting Source: Airport Manager Survey 2008, Oliver Wyman GENERAL AVIATION AIRPORT--MARKETING GOALS For general aviation airports, the goals of attracting new business to the airport, retaining current air- port tenants, and attracting more general aviation or business activity ranked as very important and were the general aviation equivalent of the air service development priorities of the commercial service airports. As at the commercial service airports, promoting a positive view of the airport ranked very high. For general aviation airports, this goal ranked second in importance only to attracting new business to the airport, and was the goal on which airport managers spent the most time. The following goals were ranked next and were of equal importance: promoting the airport to funding sources; addressing public safety, noise, and land use issues; attracting developers to the airport; and marketing hangars. The one unexpected marketing goal that general aviation airports listed as very important was the rein- statement of commercial air service. Three airports that had lost commercial air service listed this as one of their most important marketing priorities. For general aviation airports, lobbying their congressional delegation was the least important of the major marketing goals (see Exhibit 3.11).

OCR for page 19
Scope of Your Marketing Plan 21 Exhibit 3.11--General Aviation Airport Marketing Goals. Attract new business to the airport Promote positive view of airport in the community Retain current airport tenants Attract more general aviation or business activity Promote airport to funding sources Address public safety, noise & land use issues Attract developers to the airport Market hangars Reinstate air service Lobby congressional delegation 0 2 4 6 8 10 Number of Airports Reporting Source: Airport Manager Survey 2008, KRAMER aerotek, inc.