Cover Image

Not for Sale



View/Hide Left Panel
Click for next page ( 24


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 23
23 1.3 Scale of Air Travel within the take this trip by transferring at a point such as Newark (EWR), Two Study Areas LaGuardia (LGA), or Philadelphia (PHL). From the vantage point of OD analysis, they are portrayed here as flows between This section deals with the city-pair volumes of existing air the Boston region family of airports and the Richmond/Norfolk travel, which are perhaps better described as "metro-region family of airports. These East Coast aviation flows are examined pair" passenger volumes between "families of airports." Clas- on an airport-by-airport basis in Chapter 4 of this report. sic origindestination (OD) "desire lines" are presented for the East Coast study area and the West Coast study area, making possible a revealing comparison of the aviation passenger 1.3.2 Metro-area to Metro-area Pair volumes between the two coastal areas. Air Passenger Flows within the West Coast Study Area 1.3.1 Metro-area to Metro-area Pair Figure 1.4 summarizes air passenger travel within the West Air Passenger Flows within the Coast study area between January and December 2007. It can Eastern Mega-region be best understood as a desire line diagram showing the flows between airports of origin to the airports of destination of Figure 1.3 summarizes air passenger travel within the East about 20 million air trips. As in Figure 1.3, flows are expressed Coast study area between January and December 2007. It can be best understood as a desire line diagram showing the flows from their airport of origin to their airport of destination between airports of origin to the airports of destination of without reference to possible use of transfers or connections. somewhat under 10 million air trips. Trip makers between, say, These lines represent the flow of airport passengers between Manchester, NH (MHT) and Richmond, VA (RIC) may under- the large metropolitan areas and other large metropolitan areas. These West Coast aviation flows are examined on an airport-by-airport basis in Chapter 4 of this report. Note: The absence of a line between two areas means that the number of air trips is Note: The absence of a line between two areas means that the number of air insignificant. trips is insignificant. Figure 1.3. Air passenger flows between metro Figure 1.4. Air passenger flows between metro regions in 2007: East Coast (4). regions in 2007: West Coast (4).