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39 APPENDIX C Summarized Survey Results ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE QUESTION 1: What is the mission statement for your organization? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments To provide a safe, efficient, Delivering transportation To build and operate the No. environmentally sound projects, providing public total transit system. Is not aware of one. multimodal transportation information and serving as Will send it. system for all users a dynamic forum for especially the taxpayers of regional planning and the state. collaboration in the greater Improving mobility across MPO area. the state. Planning efficient To provide a safe transportation for the transportation system that community. insures the mobility of No. people and goods, On the website. enhances economic On the website. prosperity and preserves Improve the quality of life the quality of our and the economic vitality in environment and the region by working communities. collaboratively together. Provides a safe, seamless, (We don't have any and sustainable mention of humans but we transportation system that are all working to improve supports the state's the quality of life here). economy and is sensitive to We serve the governments its citizens and of the Mississippi Gulf environment. Coast, including Hancock, Plan, build, maintain, and Harrison, and Jackson operate a superior County as the Metropolitan transportation system Planning Organizations for enhancing safety, mobility, the programming for and economic growth. federal transportation funds Provide a statewide within the urbanized areas transportation system to and perform various urban meet the needs of our and regional land use and citizens. comprehensive planning Providing the highest activities. quality integrated Build a stronger regional transportation services for community through economic benefit and cooperation, leadership, improved quality of life. and planning. Provide a world-class Uniting the region's elected transportation experience officials, planning that delights our customers professionals, and the and promotes a prosperous public with a common state. vision of making a great Yes, it's a DOT one. region even greater; Improving lives by shaping the way we live, improving transportation. work, and play; building

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40 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE QUESTION 1: What is the mission statement for your organization? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Provide leadership in the consensus on improving protection, preservation, transportation, promoting and enhancement of the smart growth, protecting natural, social, historic, and the environment, and visual environment while enhancing the economy. actively involving the On the web page. public, resource agencies, To ensure that our and other interested parties transportation tax dollars in planning, developing, are spent effectively to and maintaining the state's improve mobility, support transportation system. economic progress and safeguard the environment and provide opportunities for public input into the transportation planning and project development process. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE QUESTION 2: Is the agency centralized/decentralized? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Centralized. Centralized. Centralized. Centralized. Centralized (headquarters Centralized. Centralized. Centralized. and 12 districts). Centralized. Decentralized (seven Centralized. districts, turnpike office, Centralized. central office). Centralized. Centralized. Centralized. Central office and 6 Centralized. districts. Centralized. Decentralized (six districts)/ administrative work Part of a joint city/county mostly centralized. agency. Decentralized with a Centralized. structure of seven regions. Central office and 10 district offices. Centralized (six district maintenance offices and the Turnpike office). Centralized (headquarters and three regions). Centralized.

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41 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE QUESTION 3: Is authority for public involvement held at headquarters/regions/districts or all? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Authority held in Headquarters. Headquarters does Press Secretary for public headquarters with nine Headquarters. agency-wide outreach. affairs and Public divisions responsible for Headquarters. Work closely with Relations. coordination. counterpart for stakeholder Headquarters (partner with Headquarters. Guidance/training comes affairs offices targeted to DOT and FHWA). Headquarters. out of headquarters with construction. districts conducting public Headquarters. involvement. MPO (collaborate w/local All. jurisdictions on individual work). All (headquarters, regions, seven districts). Headquarters. Headquarters w/district Headquarters. assistance as needed. Headquarters. Headquarters w/district Headquarters. assistance as needed. Headquarters and regions (shared on Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements/regions handle Categorical Exclusions with assistance from headquarters). Both. Headquarters. Headquarters. Headquarters.

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42 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE QUESTION 4: How are public involvement responsibilities distributed throughout the agency? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Joint effort between central Director of External Affairs Two-fold responsibility-- Various people in the office and divisions. Central and Member Services with one with broader umbrella agency have public office serves as oversight. assistance from and one with the projects. involvement In environmental, the communications staff; There are totally different responsibilities. environmental planner is project manager(s). people involved in these Project managers handle responsible for organizing Public Involvement divisions. public involvement public involvement. Manager and Public Two groups in the agency responsibilities with Central office for statewide Information Officer; project that do public involvement. assistance from plans; districts/individual managers; consultants. government liaisons. departments (planning, Everybody (except Consultants also provide environmental, design & Financial Officer). assistance. right-of-way) within the Team effort--Manager of district for planning studies, Public Outreach; corridor studies, NEPA Department of Support studies, design and Services; Department of construction. Community Services; Split into various areas-- Department of NEPA, environmental Comprehensive Planning; planners have some Department of responsibilities; district Communication; Workforce planning and programming Development; Aging --engineers have some of Division; Governmental the responsibilities. Services Division. Headquarters, but each of Project team(s). the districts has a public Not officially distributed involvement person and a throughout the agency-- communications person. based on collaboration. Staff of three dedicated for Operationally--mandated public involvement. to maintain open records; Regions and programmatically--develop Transportation Service and maintain a public Centers with assistance participation plan for the depending upon the level of MPO planning process; controversy. project level--develop Distributed throughout the public participation plans agency. for individual studies. Project managers and lead Directors of media and staff are generally in public relations are charge. primarily involved in All at headquarters. community relations. Most of the staff is involved in Headquarters, but the some aspect of public regional Public Involvement involvement. Officer does help them out with public involvement. Public affairs office focuses on the media aspect and there are other staff members who engage in public involvement, but it is not their main responsibility. Everyone does other things.

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43 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE QUESTION 4: How are public involvement responsibilities distributed throughout the agency? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Two branches of public involvement--Air Quality group does outreach for specific programs (vanpool/carpool, telecommuting); Transportation Planning and Programming side deals with LRTP and Transportation Improvement Program. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE QUESTION 5: What phases of transportation decision making in the agency have public involvement components (policy development, systems planning, project planning, environment, design, right-of-way, construction, and operations and maintenance)? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Project planning, Policy development, Capital projects and service Policy development, environment, design, and systems planning, project planning. transportation systems right-of-way. planning. Policy development, planning, project planning. Systems planning, Policy development, systems planning, project Policy development, environment, design, right- system planning, planning, environment, systems planning, project of-way, construction. environmental planning, design, right-of-way, planning, environment, Planning and policy, NEPA, project planning. construction, operations design, right-of-way, environment, systems Policy development, and maintenance. construction, operations planning, environment, systems planning, project and maintenance. design, right-of-way, planning, environment, operations, maintenance. design. Project planning, pre- Systems planning, project construction, construction planning, environment. (on some projects). Policy development, Planning and programming systems planning, project section, project planning, environment. development, design, right- Policy development, of-way, construction, systems planning. operation and Policy development, maintenance. systems planning, project Policy development, planning, environmental. systems planning, project Policy development, planning, environment, systems planning, project design; small amount with planning. Environmental, construction, operations design, and right-of-way and maintenance. would be done through Policy development, DOT. systems planning, project Policy development, planning, environment, systems planning, project right-of-way, construction, planning. operations and Policy development, maintenance. systems planning.

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44 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE QUESTION 5: What phases of transportation decision making in the agency have public involvement components (policy development, systems planning, project planning, environment, design, right-of-way, construction, and operations and maintenance)? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments NEPA, policy development, Policy development, systems planning, project systems planning (large planning. corridors) Policy development, systems planning, project planning, environment, design, right-of-way, construction, operations and maintenance. Policy development, systems planning, project planning, environment, design, right-of-way, construction, operations and maintenance. Project planning, environment (during NEPA), design, right-of- way.

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45 STAFFING QUESTION 6: How many staff in your organization conduct public involvement? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Varies with the divisions At least half of our staff is Sixteen people. Eight planners. and need for special involved in public A director, six outreach Twelve people and the expertise. involvement regularly. reps, four stakeholder police department conduct All of approximately 200 Two people are dedicated affairs reps, plus public involvement also. environmental planners public involvement, but contractors that were hired have the authority. additional staff is trained. with public involvement There are so many and we Staff of eight people. knowledge during design have consultants--guess Four full-time staff, but build. about 50. Not counting many other staff members central office, eight conduct public involvement districts. Districts rely on also. consultants. One or two Four staff members help districts have a designated with public involvement, but public involvement staff others assist if needed. person, but not all. One staff member with No one designated public primary responsibility. involvement, also do other Another staff member social, environmental, air, works on communication and noise studies. (press releases, etc.) Central office--about 20 All 13 staff members do (eight person section in public involvement in some public hearing office plus capacity. planners). Five people are attached to About 15 people. the public involvement One or two people at each tasks. In the work program Transportation Service there is an element Center have responsibility; dedicated solely to PI-- one or two people at each Citizen Participation and of the regions do face-to- Public Information. face. Budgeted time for eight Headquarters has between people. 50 and 75 people; Everyone. approximately 45 project The MPO Administrator managers statewide. and three planners. 2530 people. Fifteen people on staff who Three people--one person conduct public involvement. in each region. Five of NEPA staff are most involved with public involvement within the Environmental Division; Community Relations office helps (public affairs).

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46 STAFFING QUESTION 7: What are their qualifications (academic training and work experience), professional designations (e.g., register engineer), or memberships in professional organizations (AICP, APA, IAP2) others? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Preconstruction engineer Communications staff has Two keys are good oral Professional license ultimately responsible different backgrounds in and written communication required; require all (almost always PE); public involvement; skills and a sense of members to be members of varying degrees under that; community outreach understanding that we are APA and most have AICP planners help with specialist has a public agency and that or PE. meetings as project teacher/volunteer the public has a right to be Both have PEs. managers. background and is a included in and it is our Besides marketing and member of IAP2; responsibility to include customer service, hire from organizational membership them in all of our decision a variety of approved with IAP2. making. majors, including all Primary PI personnel-- So many of the staffers sciences and social environmental were staffers with an sciences. Some planners science/marketing. elected official and are very belong to National Assn. of Senior planner has Masters familiar with public Environmental Professions; and is AICP; GIS person engagement and public some planners are AICP. has Masters and is AICP; involvement. Some project managers Bike/Pedestrian guy has a are engineers, some are Bachelors and eight years AICP, some have been experience; Transit planner certified; some staff have has a Masters in Public the experience and are Administration. very serious about doing a Backgrounds in education, good job involving the planning, public public. administration, marketing, Degrees vary; generally a environmental; most of the Bachelor's is required. planners have AICPs; NTI Communication skills-- courses, leadership engaging, like working with strategies training, meeting people, communicate facilitation, conflict effectively, flexible, resolution. adaptable, clear thinkers. No specific training or Pretty diverse group from background in public other disciplines involvement--two have environmental AICPs. documentation and right-of- Bachelors and Masters in way. social work. Journalism degree helps; Professional memberships when screening applicants, like AICP, APA or other look for things like human professional organizations services skills or --AMPO, NARC; attend experience or training. TRB. Can't answer--only Person that heads up conjecture. public involvement has Unknown. some media background. No. Others are primarily In CIA, at least a degree in professional planners, most planning; membership in with a graduate degree in professional groups is an planning and social science added bonus; will pay for background; we are professional license; ability conscious of those with the ability to communicate.

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47 STAFFING QUESTION 7: What are their qualifications (academic training and work experience), professional designations (e.g., register engineer), or memberships in professional organizations (AICP, APA, IAP2) others? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments to go to national Backgrounds in marketing, conferences (TRB, working with the press and AASHTO), training (NHI, other media. NTI). Public administration; PE, NEPA group has a planners have Masters registered geologist. Degrees in City and Regional planning. Some staff has backgrounds in marketing and public relations; others are largely planners with Masters degrees and many are AICP; push membership in professional organizations.

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48 STAFFING QUESTION 8: What training have these staff received in Community Impact Assessment, Environmental Justice, Public Involvement, or Context Sensitive Solutions? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments NHI course on public Send all staff to at least Internal and external Attend conferences and involvement. one conference a year; training; customer service seminars. Future plan is to develop community outreach classes for all levels; try to EJ and Title VI training; training for staff; get a little specialist attended EJ be involved in professional attend different training in their CIA workshop (two training; member of organizations--marketing, classes; members of day), but most of it is on- California Public Women's Transportation American Public Works the-job experience. Information Officials Assn. Seminar, APTA; attended Assn., Institute for Public involvement, Title VI, --attended annual TRB. Transportation Engineers; Sociocultural Effects conference; member of Don't have much internal attended CSS courses. Evaluation; environmental AMPO and NARC. training--able to go to conference every two NTI courses, IAP2 training, conferences and do off-site years; planning conference; the agency allows us to go training. design conference; project to conferences. We train management conference. whenever possible. Primarily public Try to attend conference involvement and out of state to get training environmental justice, on Title VI and CIA. Due to context sensitive solutions, funding, try to get training Title VI, DOT sponsored to come to them. training; NHI classes. Participated as a presenter Internal soft skills training, in the statewide NHI public involvement, sociocultural effects CSS, CIA. evaluation training. Staff NHI or NCHRP courses; in- member that did attend house training/experience; training no longer with IAP2 (one person). them. NHI effective public No formalized training. involvement techniques; Everyone reviews the environmental clearance public involvement plan process; limited and participates in participation in conferences coordination meetings; like TRB, APRA, AMPO. send staff members to conferences. In-house/external training on CIA, environmental NTI courses on public justice, public involvement, involvement and context sensitive solutions; environmental justice; project development; NEPA FHWA trainings; (every other year); conferences. Systematic Development of Continuing education units Informed Consent; limited through NHI or APA; participation in conferences attended CSS and like TRB; requirement to Complete Streets training; become a member of APA, specialized technical AICP or joining IAP2. training through Context sensitive solutions; consultants. various outside courses; They use all available limited participation in external training, go to conferences. AMPO meetings, TRB, and Texas MPO conferences.

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49 STAFFING QUESTION 8: What training have these staff received in Community Impact Assessment, Environmental Justice, Public Involvement, or Context Sensitive Solutions? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments National conferences (TRB, EJ and Title VI training; AASHTO); NHI and NTI Planners Methodology-- courses for PI, EJ, Title VI, how to ensure federal public speaking; in-house mandates in EJ and Title VI training from experienced are met and how to prepare staff. a public participation plan. CIA course by FHWA; EJ, public involvement and internal CSS class; NHI CSS conferences held by NEPA class. DOT. NHI public involvement course; EJ training; attend all conferences.

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80 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS QUESTION 32: What are the outcomes you expect from your public involvement efforts? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Measurable outcomes-- coming to meetings. you can always go back to People who are better the number of people that educated on what the plans come to your meeting that are, what the process is, you talked to, numbers of how they can be engaged comments, hits on should they choose to be. websites, numbers of A more knowledgeable meetings, etc. One of the public, improved measurable outcomes--is communication between the project the right project the public and the planning and is it going forward? process, the planners, and Better and more a better substantiation of enlightened decisions and the plan that results from a more informed public. the process. Informed consent. That the public involvement Consensus and buy-in for process is seriously taken the project. into account by policy A project that is completed leaders when we are doing and agreed upon in a any of our policy collaborative way that documents. might not necessarily Getting new people to address all of the concerns come to meetings, media to of everybody, but a write stories about us, and consensus was reached. A a diverse group at our livable project with all events. stakeholders. Expecting better An informed public. information from the public regarding what they see as major issues. When a construction crew shows up on the highway, the public will have been made aware of that prior to it happening and they have had some opportunity if they wish to weigh in on that decision to send in the construction crew.

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81 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS QUESTION 33: Have you developed quantitative/qualitative measures for the effectiveness of your public involvement? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments No. Their public participation No. No. Rudimentary on their part-- plan has a section in it that No. Yes, they are doing the not sophisticated. Keep talks about how to evaluate reporting. Ask everybody to rolls and head counts. all of our things. debrief on specifics. Yes--document sent to Yes and no. individual interviewer. evaluations based on No. number of newsletters distributed, etc. going to Measure the things we use clicker to vote can--number of meetings, anonymously during number of newsletters meetings. distributed, amount of project correspondence Required by FHWA. Sign-in sent out, display sheets for meetings. expenditures, number of Did evaluation reports for a brochures, etc. long time, but kept No. changing how we wanted to do things because things No. were changing in the whole Have done a few--looking network of possibilities so for other ways to measure the numbers were not what they are doing. Hard comparable after. Can't because it is not hard and judge the secondary and fast. tertiary effects of public No. involvement. Evaluate project in terms of None that are written. what you think worked and Not specifically outlined did not work. Looking for yet. Do some informal scientific numbers--would tracking--number of e- have to hire someone to do newsletters distributed, etc. that for us. Yes, the usual number of No. people in attendance, website hits, what is the actual feedback. In various aspects--in the area of air quality they clearly have. Post season surveys. Don't have any formal way of measuring this. Do a debriefing session with staff and talk about what worked and what didn't. Developed ways to evaluate the tools. In public participation plan, identified all the tools used and have performance goals and how they evaluate success. Unknown.

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82 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS QUESTION 34: Do those measures include measures of the equity or inclusiveness of your public involvement to assure that your efforts target groups that are traditionally underrepresented in the decision making process and underserved by transportation facilities? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Not applicable. Yes, there are specific Transit equity is a big deal No. Don't have any measures. sections that deal with for us. Found that the Yes. These include measures environmental justice. criteria that we use for for equity or inclusiveness. They do not have a formal where we put service is First objective is equity-- process, but their using ridership number 1-- provide equitable access to Community Characteristics transit equity follows transportation decision- Program provides them because the more transit making. One of the with good information. dependent a neighborhood indicators is access to The MPO tries to get to all is the more the ridership information and of the people as much as potential. participation opportunities possible. No. by persons with disabilities, We found this didn't work. convenience of meetings They don't have any and events to public measures of effectiveness. transportation when No measures of available, geographic effectiveness. dispersion, convenience of meeting and time and Nominally. locations. We don't. Not applicable. Yes. Once into project, may They cover a variety of identify groups and need to populations. take a different approach. They have never More opportunity to do so established performance in larger projects. measures. Not applicable. Not applicable. It is the Tracker/Tracker Performance Measures on website. Not applicable. Not applicable. Not applicable.

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83 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS QUESTION 35: How do you measure the cost-effectiveness of your public involvement activities? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments The DOT does what it They are in our Public They don't. They don't do this. takes to do public transportation plan with an They don't. Tracking all of the involvement. extension matrix in that miscellaneous expenses Do what it takes to do plan. Broken down into for public involvement. public involvement. optional and required Really don't. activities--try to do as many of the optional Do not measure this. activities as are feasible We don't. within the cost and time of The DOT does what it the project. For each takes to do public activity, we have a number involvement. of different measurements Better and more for what meets the enlightened decisions and requirements. a more informed and Doesn't think this is done involved public. We have per se--just ensure that not developed any what they do is effective. quantitative measures for They don't. effectiveness. Have in the past. Put Do not measure this. together numbers that Do not measure this. showed how much we Do what it takes. spent on it. Don't normally Do not measure cost- do that. effectiveness. They don't. Do not do this. Do not measure it. Do not measure cost- effectiveness. Doesn't know. They don't. Doesn't know.

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84 EFFECTIVE, COST-EFFECTIVE, AND INEFFECTIVE TECHNIQUES QUESTION 36: What specific techniques have been most effective? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Informal public involvement Community level meetings. Door-to-door meetings; Surveys--online and out in meeting. Blocks and ribbons; clicker, bus/train meetings; one-on- the community; go to senior Open house with all brochures; animations; one meetings; open centers and the housing aspects of the project in piggybacking on other houses; going to churches, authority. one place; meeting location events. community centers, One-on-one meetings; that is in the project area Strings and ribbons, community organizations, working with community and accessible; information brochures, piggybacking on hair salons. liaisons (i.e., Korean booths/kiosks at other events. Partnerships with other liaison). school/community events; Small discussion groups; organizations. coordinating with churches. constant contact with the Targeted meetings with people you are working various interested with; special targeted groups/parties; little meetings. targeted group meetings; Open house meetings; identify various groups and meetings with meeting in their place, in groups/neighborhoods; in their language. rural areas, contact Piggyback on community community leaders. based organizations; Online outreach--e- flyers/letters; talk with newsletters, partnership people in the community. with libraries (online Quarterly newsletters, open survey), radio advertising. houses, project specific Charettes--give websites, project offices for participants blank slate and larger projects. let them build; visuals; one- Small group and one-on- on-one conversation; one meetings school-based work; maps Visualization; before/after and traffic counts on photos, Google earth, and website. aerial imagery; morphs and One-on-one meetings drive-thrus; simulation and within the community. videos. Emails; personalization; Open house public Dots and Dashes game; meetings; interpreters; news articles. large print materials, as Advisory committees. requested; websites (track One-on-one community repeat visitors and break meetings. down by district). Meetings with elected officials and general public, place making, charettes, workshops; aerial maps with nothing on them-- collect input from public about their community and concerns. Going out to the public and showing them aerial maps with nothing on them.

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85 EFFECTIVE, COST-EFFECTIVE, AND INEFFECTIVE TECHNIQUES QUESTION 36: What specific techniques have been most effective? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Doesn't think DOT has branched out enough for them to know. EFFECTIVE, COST-EFFECTIVE, AND INEFFECTIVE TECHNIQUES QUESTION 37: What specific techniques have been most cost-effective? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments DOT has not been Workshops. Focused group meetings; Flyers and mailings; concerned that much with Going to the community; neighborhood meetings; announcements at council cost--whatever it takes. blocks and ribbons. build relationships in meetings. Open houses in the project Don't measure cost- community; be a resource Signs on the road (variable area spread over time and effectiveness. for the community. message signs and static in different geographic Small group meetings. Using community based signs); website. locations. organizations. Working with key Piggybacking on other community meetings. leaders/personal visits. Direct invites; send Online outreach. information home with kids. In-house staff to go out into Websites, open house the public; Facebook. meetings. Do not measure cost- Area engineers and local effectiveness. public affairs managers out Website and email blasts. in the community talking with people; working with Email announcements. local officials; news Focused group meetings releases. that we have been invited Common sense and to participate in someone's adopting an attitude that neighborhood association the public is an important meeting. Haven't done a part of the process and good job with Hispanic and figuring out how to involve Vietnamese communities-- the public in low cost ways don't go out and meet one- beginning with day-to-day on-one with these operations and how we do communities because we our jobs. don't speak the language. They use their own staff members rather than consultant staff at their public meetings. Being cost-effective depends on the project. Taking maps into the community and talking with them; surveys sent home with kids (for kids and parents). Information table at school.

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86 EFFECTIVE, COST-EFFECTIVE, AND INEFFECTIVE TECHNIQUES QUESTION 38: What specific techniques have been ineffective? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Newspaper as the only Using PR firms and for- Public hearing; newspaper Don't know what is means of advertisement. profit organizations. advertising. ineffective. Newspaper advertising. Talking head workshops. Public hearings for service Newspaper advertising Meeting location that is not Advertising a poster changes; newspaper (most expensive ads). in the project location or session. advertising. difficult to find; meetings at Public meetings with maps inconvenient times. on walls. Putting information in the Newspaper advertising. paper. Newspaper advertising. Advertisements in the Open houses (a couple) to newspaper. discuss the long range Traditional public hearing plan. with assigned time to speak Newspaper advertising; too (3 minute limits, etc.). many meetings. Can't think of anything Sending out flyers ineffective. indiscriminately; newspaper Newspaper advertising. advertising. Going out with a plan that's Newspaper advertising. already prepared. Using government Newspaper buildings as meeting advertisements. Mail lists locations. based on the tax assessor information only (excludes renters). Putting an ad in the paper. EFFECTIVE, COST-EFFECTIVE, AND INEFFECTIVE TECHNIQUES QUESTION 39: Distinguish these by segments of the public that you target (limited English proficiency, low literacy, elderly/disabled, those without access to public transportation, second/third shift workers, single mothers with children, other underrepresented groups)? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Meet with minority groups Use community based LEP--alternative LEP--provide translator; in churches; post flyers; partners; post fliers in languages, attend alternative languages for early meetings where there community health clinics community functions, materials/announcements; is high unemployment; and public agencies. provide translation Elderly/Disabled--ADA various meeting times. Go out into the community; services, door-to-door accessible facilities, LEP--same techniques, Low Literacy--one-on-one meetings, use more distribute announcements different language; communication, assist with symbols; at senior facilities. Elderly/Disabled--field paperwork; LEP--use CCP Elderly/Disabled--ADA LEP--alternative surveys, community to identify areas and use accessible buses, large languages for materials, centers, retirement proper tools--assist with print materials, coordinate use community liaisons, homes/communities, sign-in, use videos, use with Ride Connections piggyback on community vanpools. radio; Elderly/Disabled-- (non-profit group to assist events; Elderly/Disabled-- LEP--Distribute notices in ADA accessible facilities, in spreading the word). large print materials, various languages, use work with local coordinating Tailor material, marketing readable in gray scale (for community leaders; board; Single Moms-- and message to particular those who are color blind); Elderly--schedule welcome kids at meetings. audience. No Transportation--

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87 EFFECTIVE, COST-EFFECTIVE, AND INEFFECTIVE TECHNIQUES QUESTION 39: Distinguish these by segments of the public that you target (limited English proficiency, low literacy, elderly/disabled, those without access to public transportation, second/third shift workers, single mothers with children, other underrepresented groups)? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments meetings around elderly Low Literacy--animations; meeting locations on transit schedule (supper/early Elderly/Disabled--go out to routes, go out into bird). them, work with communities as requested. LEP and transportation Elderly/Disabled--meetings disadvantaged board. in their neighborhoods; Low Work with their Literacy--court recorders; representatives. No Transportation-- LEP--provide alternative coordinate shuttles; languages; Low Literate-- 2nd/3rd shift--schedule use court reporter; meetings in between shifts Elderly/Disabled--late at various locations; Moms afternoon/early evening w/ Kids--provide color meetings (4:008:00 p.m.). books/crayons. Low Literacy--use LEP--received good networks through social feedback from local town work; contact volunteer managers and mayors, center(s). LEP--networks contact newspapers and through social work; ask for assistance on volunteer center(s), census translating ads and writing data. some sort of article to help LEP--translator for get the word out. Low meetings, no low literacy, Literate--identify group transportation for the through development of elderly, on-call transport for public involvement plan. those with no cars, multiple Elderly/disabled--yes. meetings for shifts, no child Active discussion to identify care. who the stakeholders are. Child care and food--never LEP--use alternative provided child care or food language media contacts, at meetings. Have served work with church groups; light refreshment, but not Elderly/Disabled--work the norm. Have had with senior citizen homes, occasional activity to keep go to them; No younger folks occupied Transportation--use (color books/crayons, locations with access to reading books). public transportation. Low Literacy--talk with LEP--provide translators, people and explain things visual displays-- to them, help them sign in, before/after use television or radio photos/drawings; No (information/news Transportation--broadcast releases); Hearing/Visually phone number and publish Impaired--hearing it in newspaper ad to assistive devices, large arrange travel; 2nd/3rd print versions; No shift--move meetings Transportation--coordinate around (different with others to transport times/locations). people; Moms w/ Kids-- LEP--legal notices in foreign language

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88 EFFECTIVE, COST-EFFECTIVE, AND INEFFECTIVE TECHNIQUES QUESTION 39: Distinguish these by segments of the public that you target (limited English proficiency, low literacy, elderly/disabled, those without access to public transportation, second/third shift workers, single mothers with children, other underrepresented groups)? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments bring kids to meeting, serve newspapers, website food. translatable into most LEP--mailings in common languages; Low alternative languages, Literacy--visualization; translation services; Low radio advertising. Literate--be more Can't say they do anything observant of those that specific to target them-- might have trouble reading have always targeted in and explain what they are terms of either area-wide or viewing, provide assistance a specific geographic in writing comments; region of the MPO study Elderly/Disabled--ADA area. Never done it by LEP accessible locations, or other kinds of segments. afternoon/early evening meetings; Visually Challenged--large print materials and narration; Moms w/ Kids--provide coloring sheets and fun things. LEP--alternative languages, use church contacts and community centers. LEP--provide interpreters; 2nd/3rd shift--day and evening hours. LEP--work with community members as translators; Elderly/Disabled--use senior facilities, coordinate with bus service; No Transportation--use the website, emails to commuters and carpools; Single Moms--provide food (bought or donated). LEP--provide interpreters; Elderly/Disabled--include phone number in ad to request special services.

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89 LEVERAGING RELATIONSHIPS QUESTION 40: How do you leverage your public involvement efforts to make them more effective or cost- effective (e.g., partnering with community organizations (NGOs), other public agencies, the media or others)? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Do not leverage public They use community Attend volunteer fire Piggyback on other involvement efforts. organizations, other dept. spaghetti dinners, media events. Partner with community public agencies, the PTO/Parent Teacher Partner early and do groups, NGO, media. media, and other Association meetings, early communication. Getting together with organizations. festivals, chamber other groups, going Partnering with meetings, where they are, being community club/organization part of their meetings, organizations, other meetings/functions. partnering with them, public agencies, the Work with partnering developing relationships media. organizations and with them; working with Piggyback; strings and piggyback on events. transportation ribbons game. disadvantaged local Piggyback on existing coordinating boards. activities; use Use groups that have governmental services inroads into the people to coordinate with communities or are local officials. affiliated with other Not for public business organizations involvement. They have or mutually support each for highway safety other; try to get the word meetings. out to those who will be You have to leverage-- directly impacted by the how else does one project. person reach 6 million Piggybacked in the past, people? You have to do but that's then norm what you can to try and (really a project by reach as many people as project thing). possible with a limited Use neighborhood amount of money that associations, local we have and limited staff advocacy groups like resources. bike pad or ADA groups, Radio station reads the local historic folks (as plan to the blind, applicable). distributed surveys to Work closely with schools, worked with organizations that have non-profits. non-English speaking Maintain tremendous individuals as part of working relationships their membership to help with United Way, conduct outreach.--you Neighborhood Alliance, can't do it without Urban League, and involving and getting the Latino Action Committee. support of those groups They use community that can outreach to the organizations, other individuals you are trying public agencies, the to reach. media, and other Piggyback existing organizations. activities as much as Working with coalition of possible; use Farm neighborhood Bureau.

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90 LEVERAGING RELATIONSHIPS QUESTION 40: How do you leverage your public involvement efforts to make them more effective or cost- effective (e.g., partnering with community organizations (NGOs), other public agencies, the media or others)? Departments of Metropolitan Planning Transportation Organizations Transit Agencies Local Governments Local government associations and making meetings; churches. presentations. Presentations to non- We work through profit group and other partnerships with other community based agencies and through organizations. the media. MPOs and send out information to the media.