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8 Table 2.6. Treatment Usage on PCC-Surfaced Roadways According to Pavement Condition Pavement Distress Surface Distressa Treatment Smoothness Friction Noise Light Moderate Heavy Concrete joint resealing Limited None Limited Extensive Moderate Limited Concrete crack sealing Limited None Limited Extensive Moderate Limited Diamond grinding Extensive Moderate Moderate Limited Limited Limited Diamond grooving Moderate Extensive Limited Limited Limited Limited Partial-depth concrete patching Moderate None Limited Moderate Extensive Moderate Full-depth concrete patching Moderate Limited Limited Limited Extensive Extensive Dowel bar retrofitting Moderate Limited Limited Limited Moderate Moderate Ultra-thin bonded wearing course Extensive Moderate Limited Moderate Moderate Limited Thin HMA overlay Moderate Moderate Limited Moderate Moderate Limited Note: Extensive = Use by 66% of respondents; Moderate = 33% to 66% usage; Limited = <33% usage. a Spalling, various forms of cracking. using each treatment was summarized, with the results shown thin PCC overlays on PCC pavements, were reportedly not in Tables 2.7 and 2.8. In these tables, extensive treatment use used on either rural or urban high-traffic-volume roadways in a climate region is understood as at least two-thirds of in deep-freeze environments. In other cases, such as use of respondents in that region reporting using the treatment on ultra-thin whitetopping, limited use may be more likely attrib- high-traffic-volume roadways. Moderate use is defined as uted to high cost or lack of local experience, rather than climate- between one-third and two-thirds of respondents using the related performance issues. treatment. Limited use is defined as less than one-third of respondents reporting using that treatment. Work Zone Duration Although there is variability among the climate regions Restrictions regarding treatment usage, for the most part there is not a sig- nificant difference between treatment use on rural versus The time available to apply a treatment is a practical consid- urban high-traffic-volume roadways within a climate region. eration in treatment selection on high-traffic-volume road- Two treatments, slurry seal on HMA-surfaced pavements and ways, as it dictates how much time is available to do the work. Table 2.7. Preservation Treatment Use on High-Traffic-Volume HMA-Surfaced Roadways, by Climate Region Microsurfacing Chip Seal Climatic Crack Crack Slurry Single Multiple Single Multiple With Region Fill Seal Seal Course Course Course Course Polymer RURAL Deep freeze Extensive Extensive None Moderate Moderate Extensive Extensive Extensive Moderate freeze Extensive Extensive Moderate Extensive Moderate Moderate Limited Limited No freeze Moderate Moderate Limited Moderate Limited Moderate Moderate Moderate URBAN Deep freeze Extensive Extensive None Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate freeze Extensive Extensive Moderate Extensive Extensive Moderate Limited Limited No freeze Extensive Extensive Moderate Moderate Limited Moderate Moderate Moderate Note: Extensive = Use by 66% of respondents; Moderate = 33% to 66% usage; Limited = <33% usage. (continued on next page)