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A P P E N D I X B Preservation Questionnaire Survey Form Introduction The practice of pavement preservation in general and preventive maintenance in particular is a growing trend among trans- portation agencies around the United States. Over the past decade alone, a number of state highway agencies (SHA) have created or formalized their preservation programs. At the same time, other agencies that might have been practicing preser- vation for a longer time have extended their programs to cover a greater proportion of their pavement network than ever before. Still other agencies are today in the process of creating formal preservation programs. While many agencies are in the process of formalizing, extending, or developing their pavement preservation programs, there is a need for further information regarding the use of preservation on high-traffic-volume roadways. The practices used on these facilities are viewed by some as not as widespread or well documented as on lower-volume roadways. The Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP 2) Renewal Project R26 is addressing the need for this important infor- mation in the following manner: Synthesizing the current state of the practice for preservation approaches for high-traffic-volume roadways; Developing guidelines on pavement preservation strategies for high-traffic-volume roadways; and Identifying promising pavement preservation strategies for application on high-traffic-volume roadways that might not commonly be used. Purpose of Questionnaire The purpose of this questionnaire is to obtain information on current pavement preservation practices for high-traffic- volume roadways from North American and international practitioners. Techniques used for lower-volume roadways may not be appropriate for high-traffic-volume roadways, because as less time is available to construct the treatments and night work may not be feasible. Responses collected from this questionnaire will be used to develop a comprehensive summary of the current state of practice for both portland cement concrete (PCC) and hot-mix asphalt (HMA) surfaced pavements. The survey results will also be used to develop guidelines for the use of these treatments that can be implemented by pub- lic agencies. You are being asked to complete this questionnaire because of your background and familiarity with your agency's pave- ment preservation practices. Your response is very important. It will lead to improved guidance on the use of pavement preservation for high-traffic-volume roadways, which in turn should contribute to improved pavement performance and lower costs to maintain these important pavements. If, however, you feel that someone else in your organization is more qualified to respond to this request for information, please pass this on to them. Thank you in advance for your assistance. 106

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107 Questionnaire Respondent Information Please provide some general information about yourself and your experience with pavement preservation: Name ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Title ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ E-mail ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Pavement preservation experience/background (e.g., I have been involved in . . . ; responsibilities in pavement preser- vation include . . .): Definitions Used in the Survey Several terms are used throughout this questionnaire. The following definitions are provided for the sake of consistency and not as an attempt to impose on an agency a specific definition of any of these terms. Pavement Preservation--A program employing a network level, long-term strategy that enhances pavement per- formance by using an integrated, cost-effective set of practices that extend pavement life, improve safety, and meet motorist expectations. Pavement Preventive Maintenance--A planned strategy of cost-effective treatments applied to an existing roadway system and its appurtenances that preserves the system, retards future deterioration, and maintains or improves the func- tional condition of the system (without increasing the structural capacity). Preventive Maintenance Treatment--Any individual maintenance activity that is used in a preventive manner (i.e., applied to a pavement in relatively good condition as defined by the agency), while not adding any structural capacity to the pavement. Examples, of preventive maintenance treatments include crack sealing and joint resealing, fog seals, chip seals, slurry seals, microsurfacing, dowel bar retrofitting, diamond grinding, and combinations of these types of actions. Functional Condition--The condition of the roadway which enables it to provide safe, unimpeded service. Functional condition is measured by factors such as surface distress, smoothness, and skid resistance. The functional condition of a roadway does not include consideration of the pavement's load carrying, or structural, condition. Contract Maintenance--Contract maintenance is the use of a contract to outsource maintenance activities (either to the private sector or to another public agency) that had been done by the agency itself. Contract maintenance, also known as maintenance-by-contract and privatized maintenance, addresses the transfer of work traditionally conducted by the public sector to the private sector. Warranties--Warranties provide contracting agencies with another level of protection against early contractor failure or default, construction problems, or other performance issues. Simply put, a warranty is an assurance to any agency that the work completed by the contractor was constructed in a sound manner and that it will remain in acceptable condition for a stated period of time. Performance Specifications--The performance criteria should describe the outcome that is being sought from the con- tractor in each year of the contract period and provide the contractor with the autonomy needed to achieve the results speci- fied. When setting the criteria, the agency should ensure that the state goals are achievable over the contracting period: they should be at least as high as the standards observed by the agency itself. Quality Control/Quality Assurance (QC/QA)--Quality control generally refers to testing by the contractor for the purpose of process control and to ensure meeting or exceeding specifications. Quality assurance typically involves testing by the agency or its representative to determine compliance with specifications.

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108 Questions 1. Please provide details of the typical average daily traffic (ADT) values associated with the traffic classifications of low, medium, and high traffic volume for rural and urban roadways in your agency. These classifications will be used as the basis for further questions in the questionnaire. Rural, Low Volume is less than or equal to Rural, Medium Volume range is (e.g., . . . to . . .) Rural, High Volume is greater than or equal to Urban, Low Volume is less than or equal to Urban, Medium Volume range is (e.g., . . . to . . .) Urban, High Volume is greater than or equal to 2. There are a variety of factors that influence the selection of a preventive maintenance treatment. Please rank the follow- ing 18 factors in terms of the level of importance that your agency places on each factor when selecting the most appro- priate preventive maintenance treatment. Not Low Medium High Factor Important Priority Priority Priority Agency experience with treatment Material availability Previous treatment failure Alternate route availability Safety concerns Perception Noise Work zone Treatment cost Traffic volume Experienced contractor availability Bias against treatment Traffic control requirements Closure time Liability concerns Durability/expected treatment life Production rates Time before trafficking Risk associated with treatment failure Climate

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109 Rural Roads 3. Using the traffic classifications you defined in question 1, which of the following treatments does your agency apply in a preventive manner (i.e., to pavements in good condition) on RURAL roadways? Check all boxes that apply or mark "not used" if this treatment is not used by your agency. Treatments for Hot-Mix Asphalt (HMA)Surfaced Pavements Low Traffic Medium Traffic High Traffic Not Used Crack fill Crack seal Cape seal Fog seal Scrub seal Slurry seal Rejuvenators Single-course microsurfacing Multiple-course microsurfacing Single-course chip seal Multiple-course chip seal Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: _______________________________________ Treatments for Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) Pavements Low Traffic Medium Traffic High Traffic Not Used Concrete joint resealing Concrete crack sealing Diamond grinding Diamond grooving Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Full-depth concrete pavement patching Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Thin PCC overlays Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Drainage preservation Other: _______________________________________

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110 Urban Roads 4. Using the traffic classifications you defined in question 1, which of the following treatments does your agency apply in a preventive manner (i.e., to pavements in good condition) on URBAN roadways? Check all boxes that apply or mark "not used" if this treatment is not used by your agency. Treatments for Hot-Mix Asphalt (HMA)Surfaced Pavements Low Traffic Medium Traffic High Traffic Not Used Crack fill Crack seal Cape seal Fog seal Scrub seal Slurry seal Rejuvenators Single-course microsurfacing Multiple-course microsurfacing Single-course chip seal Multiple-course chip seal Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: _______________________________________ Treatments for Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) Pavements Low Traffic Medium Traffic High Traffic Not Used Concrete joint resealing Concrete crack sealing Diamond grinding Diamond grooving Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Full-depth concrete pavement patching Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Thin PCC overlays Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [<1 in.]) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5-in.]) Drainage preservation Other: _______________________________________ 5. Do you use a different set of treatments on RURAL high-traffic-volume roads than on RURAL low-traffic-volume roads? (Check the one answer that is most representative). If answer is yes, then proceed to "RURAL ROADS." If answer is no, then you may skip to question 6. No Yes

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111 Rural Roads Please check those treatments that you don't consider applicable for RURAL high-traffic-volume roadways. Treatments for Hot-Mix Asphalt Not Treatments for Portland Cement Not (HMA)Surfaced Pavements Applicable Concrete (PCC) Pavements Applicable Crack fill Concrete joint resealing Crack seal Concrete crack sealing Cape seal Diamond grinding Fog seal Diamond grooving Scrub seal Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Slurry seal Full-depth concrete pavement patching Rejuvenators Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Single-course microsurfacing Thin PCC overlays Multiple-course microsurfacing Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Single-course chip seal Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Multiple-course chip seal Drainage preservation Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Other: _______________________________________ Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: _______________________________________ 6. Do you use a different set of treatments on URBAN high-traffic-volume roads than on URBAN low-traffic-volume roads? (Check the one answer that is most representative). If answer is yes, then proceed to "URBAN ROADS." If answer is no, then you may skip to question 7. No Yes

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112 Urban Roads Please check those treatments that you don't consider applicable for URBAN high-traffic-volume roadways. Treatments for Hot-Mix Asphalt Not Treatments for Portland Cement Not (HMA)Surfaced Pavements Applicable Concrete (PCC) Pavements Applicable Crack fill Concrete joint resealing Crack seal Concrete crack sealing Cape seal Diamond grinding Fog seal Diamond grooving Scrub seal Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Slurry seal Full-depth concrete pavement patching Rejuvenators Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Single-course microsurfacing Thin PCC overlays Multiple-course microsurfacing Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Single-course chip seal Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Multiple-course chip seal Drainage preservation Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Other: _________________________________ Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: _______________________________________

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113 Truck Traffic 7. Please indicate whether you are more or less likely to use each treatment on high-traffic-volume roads that have HIGH TRUCK traffic volumes as compared to those with little truck traffic. If you do not use the treatment, then indicate that it is a treatment that is not used by your agency. Treatments for Hot-Mix Asphalt (HMA)Surfaced Pavements More Likely No Difference Less Likely Not Used Crack fill Crack seal Cape seal Fog seal Scrub seal Slurry seal Rejuvenators Single-course microsurfacing Multiple-course microsurfacing Single-course chip seal Multiple-course chip seal Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________ Treatments for Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) Pavements More Likely No Difference Less Likely Not Used Concrete joint resealing Concrete crack sealing Diamond grinding Diamond grooving Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Full-depth concrete pavement patching Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Thin PCC overlays Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________

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114 115 Rural Roads 8. For those treatments that were checked as "Not Used" on RURAL high-traffic-volume roadways under question 3, please indicate the reason(s) it is not being used. Check all boxes that apply. Increased Lack of Lack of Bias Risk Needed Durability/ Time HMA-Surfaced Pavement Treatments for Agency Experienced Lack of Against Previous if Failure Traffic Closure Safety Liability Expected Production before Treatment RURAL High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Experience Contractors Materials Treatment Failure Occurs Control Time Concerns Concerns Life Noise Rates Trafficking Cost Climate Crack fill Crack seal Cape seal Fog seal Scrub seal Slurry seal Rejuvenators Single-course microsurfacing Multiple-course microsurfacing Single-course chip seal Multiple-course chip seal Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________ Increased Lack of Lack of Bias Risk Needed Durability/ Time PCC Pavement Treatments for RURAL Agency Experienced Lack of Against Previous if Failure Traffic Closure Safety Liability Expected Production before Treatment High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Experience Contractors Materials Treatment Failure Occurs Control Time Concerns Concerns Life Noise Rates Trafficking Cost Climate Concrete joint resealing Concrete crack sealing Diamond grinding Diamond grooving Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Full-depth concrete pavement patching Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Thin PCC overlays Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________

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116 117 Urban Roads 9. For those treatments that were checked as "Not Used" on URBAN high-traffic-volume roadways under question 4, please indicate the reason(s) it is not being used. Check all boxes that apply. Increased Lack of Lack of Bias Risk Needed Durability/ Time HMA-Surfaced Pavement Treatments for Agency Experienced Lack of Against Previous if Failure Traffic Closure Safety Liability Expected Production before Treatment URBAN High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Experience Contractors Materials Treatment Failure Occurs Control Time Concerns Concerns Life Noise Rates Trafficking Cost Climate Crack fill Crack seal Cape seal Fog seal Scrub seal Slurry seal Rejuvenators Single-course microsurfacing Multiple-course microsurfacing Single-course chip seal Multiple-course chip seal Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________ Increased Lack of Lack of Bias Risk Needed Durability/ Time PCC Pavement Treatments for URBAN Agency Experienced Lack of Against Previous if Failure Traffic Closure Safety Liability Expected Production before Treatment High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Experience Contractors Materials Treatment Failure Occurs Control Time Concerns Concerns Life Noise Rates Trafficking Cost Climate Concrete joint resealing Concrete crack sealing Diamond grinding Diamond grooving Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Full-depth concrete pavement patching Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Thin PCC overlays Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________

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118 10. In addition to the treatments included in questions 3 or 4, are there other treatments that you are considering using, but have not? If answer is yes, then proceed. If answer is no, then skip to question 11. No Yes You stated that there are other treatments that you are considering using. Please identify any treatments that you considered using but the treatment is not fully developed, does not yet have proven performance, or was not used because of another reason. Reasons the Treatment Are Not Currently Used Other Considered Not Fully No Proven Treatment Types Developed Performance Other Reason _______________________ _____________________ _______________________ _____________________ _______________________ _____________________ _______________________ _____________________ _______________________ _____________________ Rural Roads 11. Please list the three MOST successful pavement preservation treatment types used on your RURAL high-traffic-volume roadways, starting with the most successful, and briefly explain why each treatment is successful for your agency. Treatment 1 Treatment 2 Treatment 3 Urban Roads 12. Please list the three MOST successful pavement preservation treatment types used on your URBAN high-traffic-volume roadways starting with the most successful and briefly explain why each treatment is successful for your agency. Treatment 1 Treatment 2 Treatment 3 Rural Roads 13. Please list the three LEAST successful pavement preservation treatment types used on your RURAL high-traffic-volume roadways starting with the least successful and briefly explain why each treatment is unsuccessful for your agency. Treatment 1 Treatment 2 Treatment 3

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119 Urban Roads 14. Please list the three LEAST successful pavement preservation treatment types used on your URBAN high-traffic-volume roadways starting with the least successful and briefly explain why each treatment is unsuccessful for your agency. Treatment 1 Treatment 2 Treatment 3 Rural Roads 15. Available facility closure time is an important consideration when selecting the most appropriate treatment for a pave- ment section. Please use the following to indicate under which of the following available closure time scenarios you consider using the listed treatments on RURAL roadways. HMA-Surfaced Pavement Treatments for Overnight OR High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Single Shift Weekend Longer Crack fill Crack seal Cape seal Fog seal Scrub seal Slurry seal Rejuvenators Single-course microsurfacing Multiple-course microsurfacing Single-course chip seal Multiple-course chip seal Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________ PCC Pavement Treatments for Overnight OR High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Single Shift Weekend Longer Concrete joint resealing Concrete crack sealing Diamond grinding Diamond grooving Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Full-depth concrete pavement patching (continued on next page)

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120 (continued from page 119) PCC Pavement Treatments for Overnight OR High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Single Shift Weekend Longer Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Thin PCC overlays Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________ Note: Overnight (e.g., from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.); Single Shift (e.g., 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.); Weekend (e.g., from 8 p.m. on Friday to 5 a.m. on Monday); Longer (longer than 2 days). Urban Roads 16. Please use the following to indicate under which of the following available closure time scenarios you consider using the listed treatments on URBAN roadways. HMA-Surfaced Pavement Treatments for Overnight OR High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Single Shift Weekend Longer Crack fill Crack seal Cape seal Fog seal Scrub seal Slurry seal Rejuvenators Single-course microsurfacing Multiple-course microsurfacing Single-course chip seal Multiple-course chip seal Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________ PCC Pavement Treatments for Overnight OR High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Single Shift Weekend Longer Concrete joint resealing Concrete crack sealing Diamond grinding (continued on next page)

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121 (continued from page 120) PCC Pavement Treatments for Overnight OR High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Single Shift Weekend Longer Diamond grooving Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Full-depth concrete pavement patching Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Thin PCC overlays Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________ Note: Overnight (e.g., from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.); Single Shift (e.g., 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.); Weekend (e.g., from 8 p.m. on Friday to 5 a.m. on Monday); Longer (longer than 2 days). 17. Please check any of the following contracting mechanisms that your agency uses to help ensure the quality and future performance of the following treatments on your high-traffic-volume roadways. Please check all that apply. Contracting Mechanisms Used HMA-Surfaced Pavement Treatments Performance Contract for High-Traffic-Volume Roadways QC/QA Specifications Warranties Maintenance Crack fill Crack seal Cape seal Fog seal Scrub seal Slurry seal Rejuvenators Single-course microsurfacing Multiple-course microsurfacing Single-course chip seal Multiple-course chip seal Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________

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122 Contracting Mechanisms Used PCC Pavement Treatments for Performance Contract High-Traffic-Volume Roadways QC/QA Specifications Warranties Maintenance Concrete joint resealing Concrete crack sealing Diamond grinding Diamond grooving Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Full-depth concrete pavement patching Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Thin PCC overlays Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Drainage preservation Other: _________________________________ 18. Does your agency have QC/QA procedures for preventive maintenance applications in place? If answer is no, proceed. If answer is yes, skip to question 19. No Yes. If possible, provide a copy of the procedures (by faxing, e-mailing, or providing a URL link). ___________________________________________________________________ As indicated by a "No" response to question 18, you do not currently have QC/QA procedures for preventive main- tenance treatments in place. Do you have plans for implementing them? No Yes. Specify:__________________________________________________________ As indicated by a "No" response to question 18, you indicated that your agency does not use warranty specifica- tions on any of your preventive maintenance treatments. Do you have any plans/interest in the use of warranties? No Yes. Which treatments?______________________________________________________ 19. If you indicated that agency has implemented performance-related specifications for preventive-maintenance treat- ments, briefly describe your experience with these specifications. 20. If you indicated that you do not have performance-related specifications, what are your plans for implementing them? Rural Roads 21. For RURAL high-traffic-volume roadways, which treatments do you use to address the following pavement perfor- mance issues. Please check all that apply.

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123 HMA-Surfaced Pavement Treatments for RURAL Light Moderate Heavy High-Traffic-Volume Smoothness/ Surface Surface Surface Roadways Raveling Oxidation Bleeding Ride Quality Friction Noise Distress Distress Distress Crack fill Crack seal Cape seal Fog seal Scrub seal Slurry seal Rejuvenators Single-course microsurfacing Multiple-course microsurfacing Single-course chip seal Multiple-course chip seal Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: __________________________ PCC-Surfaced Pavement Light Moderate Heavy Treatments for RURAL Smoothness/ Surface Surface Surface High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Raveling Oxidation Bleeding Ride Quality Friction Noise Distress Distress Distress Concrete joint resealing Concrete crack sealing Diamond grinding Diamond grooving Partial-depth concrete pavement patching (continued on next page)

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124 (continued from page 123) PCC-Surfaced Pavement Light Moderate Heavy Treatments for RURAL Smoothness/ Surface Surface Surface High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Raveling Oxidation Bleeding Ride Quality Friction Noise Distress Distress Distress Full-depth concrete pavement patching Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Thin PCC overlays Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Drainage preservation Other: ___________________________ Urban Roads 22. For URBAN high-traffic-volume roadways, which treatments do you use to address the following pavement performance issues. Please check all that apply. HMA-Surfaced Pavement Light Moderate Heavy Treatments for URBAN Smoothness/ Surface Surface Surface High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Raveling Oxidation Bleeding Ride Quality Friction Noise Distress Distress Distress Crack fill Crack seal Cape seal Fog seal Scrub seal Slurry seal Rejuvenators Single-course microsurfacing Multiple-course microsurfacing Single-course chip seal Multiple-course chip seal Chip seals with polymer-modified asphalt binder Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., NovaChip) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Cold milling and HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Ultra-thin HMA overlay (<20 mm [<0.75 in.]) Hot in-place HMA recycling (<50 mm [<1.95 in.]) Cold-in-place recycling (<100 mm [<4.0 in.]) Profile milling (diamond grinding) Ultra-thin whitetopping Drainage preservation Other: ____________________________

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125 PCC-Surfaced Pavement Light Moderate Heavy Treatments for URBAN Smoothness/ Surface Surface Surface High-Traffic-Volume Roadways Raveling Oxidation Bleeding Ride Quality Friction Noise Distress Distress Distress Concrete joint resealing Concrete crack sealing Diamond grinding Diamond grooving Partial-depth concrete pavement patching Full-depth concrete pavement patching Dowel bar retrofit (load-transfer restoration) Thin PCC overlays Ultra-thin bonded wearing course (e.g., HMA < 25 mm [1 in.]) Thin HMA overlay (<40 mm [<1.5 in.]) Drainage preservation Other: ___________________________ 23. Does your agency consider user costs in the treatment selection process for preventive maintenance applications? (Check the one answer that is most representative.) If you answered yes, proceed to a. If you answered no, skip to b. No Yes a. Are user costs quantified numerically in your treatment selection process? No Yes b. Does your agency have plans to begin considering (or incorporating) user costs in the treatment selection process? No Yes. Please explain: _______________________________________________________________________________ 24. There are a number of reasons why agencies may not be performing pavement preservation on high-traffic-volume roadways. Please prioritize the additional guidance that you feel is needed for the successful implementation of preser- vation strategies on high-traffic-volume roadways. 1 = No guidance needed 2 = Some guidance 3 = Significant guidance needed _____ Other agency experience with treatment _____ Typical noise associated with treatment _____ Experienced contractor availability list _____ Treatment production rates _____ List of material availability _____ Time needed before trafficking _____ Typical traffic control requirements _____ Typical treatment costs by region _____ Typical closure time information _____ Applicable traffic volumes _____ Durability/expected treatment life _____ Appropriate climatic regions for treatments