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APPENDIX G Electronic Database and Report Descriptions G.1 Electronic Database and Map Source Descriptions The following sections provide descriptive information about electronic database and map sources. Descriptive material for each source is attributable to the referenced Web pages. 1. Hazards U.S. Multi-Hazard (HAZUS-MH) Software, Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA), DHS. Web site: http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/hazus/index.shtm HAZUS-MH "is a nationally applicable standardized methodology that estimates poten- tial losses from earthquakes, hurricane winds, and floods." HAZUS-MH was developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) under contract with the National Insti- tute of Building Sciences (NIBS). HAZUS-MH uses state-of-the-art Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software to map and display hazard data and the results of damage and eco- nomic loss estimates for buildings and infrastructure. The primary application of the soft- ware is that it allows users to estimate the impacts of earthquakes, hurricane winds, and floods on populations. Its primary value for an HMCFS is the spatial data that comes with the soft- ware. HAZUS-MH provides readily available, geo-referenced, national data to enable iden- tification of inventory assets in a community, classified according to the following seven categories: 1. General Building Stock: General building types (residential, commercial, industrial, public service) and occupancy classes (single family, retail, industrial, church). 2. Essential Facilities: Facilities essential to the health and welfare of the community (hospitals, police, fire, emergency centers, schools). 3. Hazardous Material Facilities: Storage facilities for industrial hazardous materials (corrosives, flammables, explosives, radioactive, and toxins). 4. High Potential Loss Facilities: Facilities that, if affected by disaster, would have a high loss or impact on the community (nuclear power plants, dams, levees, military installations). 5. Transportation Lifeline Systems: Transportation systems for Air (airports, runways, heliports), Road (bridges, tunnels, road segments), Rail (tracks, light rail, tunnels, bridges, facilities [railyards and depots]), and Water (ports, harbors, locks, ferries). 6. Utility Lifeline Systems: Potable water, wastewater, oil, natural gas, electric power, and com- munication systems. 7. Demographics: Population statistics (total population, age, gender, race, income, workforce location). G-1

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G-2 Guidebook for Conducting Local Hazardous Materials Commodity Flow Studies HAZUS-MH requires spatial analysis software such as ESRI's ArcGIS in addition to personal computer hardware and software. Federal, state, and local government agencies, as well as the private sector, can order HAZUS-MH free of charge from the FEMA publication warehouse. 2. Freight Analysis Framework (FAF 2.2), Freight Management and Operations, FHWA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/freight_analysis/faf/index.htm The FAF is basically a commodity origindestination database whose latest version 2.2 covers the period 20022035. FAF estimates commodity flows and related freight transportation activ- ity among states, sub-state regions, and major international gateways. It also forecasts future flows among regions and relates those flows to the transportation network. FAF includes an origindestination database of commodity flows among regions, and a road network database in which flows are converted to truck payloads and related to specific routes. The FAF includes tons and value of commodity movements among regions by mode of trans- portation (truck, rail, water, air, truck-rail, and pipeline) and type of commodity Standard Clas- sification of Transported Goods (SCTG). FHWA bases provisional estimates for goods movement in the most recent calendar year (2006) on the 2002 base year database. It is built entirely from public data sources including the 2002 Commodity Flow Survey (CFS), developed by the Cen- sus Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce, and the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), U.S.DOT; Foreign Waterborne Cargo data, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; and a host of other sources. FAF statistics do not match those in mode-specific publications prima- rily due to different definitions that were used to avoid double counting. Methods in developing the 2002 base year data are transparent, and FAF has been expanded to cover all modes and sig- nificant sources of shipments. Future projected data covering years from 20102035 with a 5-year interval are based on Global Insight's proprietary economic and freight modeling packages. The FAF itself or subsequent reports, summaries, and maps can be downloaded from the Web site in MS Access format and in Microsoft Excel comma delimited (csv) format for use with pro- gramming software. Associated geographical files also are available but require use with GIS desktop products, either by ESRI or TransCad. As in the CFS, SCTG numbers are used with haz- ardous materials included in select SCTG classes. The FAF estimates commodity movements by truck and the volume of long-distance trucks over specific highways. Models are used to disaggregate interregional flows from the Commod- ity OriginDestination Database into flows among individual counties and assign the detailed flows (truck traffic) to individual highways. These models are based on geographic distributions of economic activity rather than a detailed understanding of local conditions. While providing reasonable estimates for national and multi-state corridor analyses, FAF estimates are not a substitute for local data to support local planning and project development. 3. National Transportation Atlas Database (NTAD), Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), BTS, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://www.bts.gov/publications/national_transportation_atlas_database/ NTAD "is a set of nationwide geographic databases of transportation facilities, transportation networks, and associated infrastructure. These datasets include spatial information for trans- portation modal networks and intermodal terminals, as well as the related attribute information for these features" (e.g., rail and road networks). A desktop GIS is required for using NTAD. The data can be ordered in the form of two CD-ROMs or directly downloaded from the Web site to

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Electronic Database and Report Descriptions G-3 "support research, analysis, and decision making across all modes of transportation. They are most useful at the national level but have major applications at regional, state, and local scales throughout the transportation community." Hazmat routes and road segments from the HPMS are two of the layers in NTAD. Individual road segments can be selected graphically by county FIPS (Federal Information Processing Stan- dard) code and highway number, for example. However, only selected attributes of road seg- ments are present in the NTAD GIS tables. Truck route designation (or not) of a segment is present, but the percent trucks is not. The HPMS data file (or FAF network file) will have to be consulted directly on the latter for each segment selected graphically. Traffic data on rail routes or waterways are even poorer. An advantage of NTAD is that it includes intermodal terminal locations (e.g., an airport would be an air and truck intermodal terminal). The majority of spill and release incidents occur in transfer and NTAD may be of help in a community trying to locate those. NTAD allows profes- sional maps of the study area and corridors to be produced in order to visually aid the conduct of a local/regional CFS. An alternative to NTAD would be Google maps or state-provided maps. 4. Incident Reports Database, Office of Hazardous Materials Safety (OHMS), Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Administration (PHMSA), U.S.DOT. Web site: http://www.phmsa.dot.gov/hazmat/library/data-stats/incidents Web site: https://hazmatonline.phmsa.dot.gov/IncidentReportsSearch/ The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) Office of Hazardous Materials Safety (OHMS) maintains the Hazardous Materials Incident Reporting System (HMIRS). It is the most detailed, comprehensive source for reported hazmat incidents on all modes exclud- ing pipeline. Transportation carriers are required to report hazmat-related accidents to the National Response Center. Deep-sea vessel incidents are included, but not inland waterway inci- dents. Incidents are defined as spills or releases of a material classified as hazardous, whether a vehicular accident occurred or not. The OHMS compiles and updates the incident data from incident reports as they are received and makes the data publicly available via an online user search. Because the records are self-reported and based on conditional criteria for incidents, the dataset may substantially under-report all incidents involving vehicles carrying hazardous mate- rials. Further information about HMIRS underreporting may be found in HMCRP Report 1: Hazardous Materials Transportation Incident Data for Root Cause Analysis (29). Among reports and summaries, summary statistics are prepared by OHMS and available for download in PDF format from the Web site. At the national level, 10-year and annual summaries of incidents are available. The 10-year summaries are of an aggregate nature, providing number of incidents, injuries, fatalities, and property damage dollar values by hazmat type (RAM or waste), incident type (total or serious), year, and mode. The annual summaries are more refined to include number of incidents, injuries, fatalities, and property damage values by mode, state, cause, haz- ard class, incident type (total or serious), incident result, and transportation phase. At the state level, incident summaries are refined only by mode to provide number of incidents, injuries, fatalities, and property damage values. Users can employ the search tool on PHMSA's Hazmat Incident Reports Database Web site and state their individual constraints (after selecting a year) by filling in any field(s) on the inci- dent reports database search form. These constraints offer a more customized incident search than the ready-made summaries. Although the search tool user interface does not include county as a constraint, complete datasets for an entire state, for example, can be downloaded to a CSV

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G-4 Guidebook for Conducting Local Hazardous Materials Commodity Flow Studies (comma-separated value) file and then converted to spreadsheet or database file such as Microsoft Excel or Access. If users were to download the entire file for their state over the date range desired, they could then sort the dataset by county, city, or zip code to identify those incidents that occurred within specific jurisdictional boundaries. Therefore, a more accurate, disaggregate analysis of hazardous materials incidents down to the regional or local level necessitates a modest exercise to search and retrieve the desired data directly from the database. 5. National Hazardous Materials Route Registry and Route Maps, FMCSA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://hazmat.fmcsa.dot.gov/nhmrr/index.asp?page=route Web site: http://hazmat.fmcsa.dot.gov/nhmrr/index.asp?page=maps Based on the Federal Register route listing, the FMCSA Web site provides additional useful and interactive ways to search and display the latest information on one or more hazardous materi- als route designations. A mapping application also displays the hazardous materials route(s) that should be traveled after an origin and a destination address is entered. 6. Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS), Office of Highway Policy Information, FHWA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policy/ohpi/hpms/index.cfm HPMS is "a national-level highway information system that includes [a wide array of] data on the extent, condition, performance, use, and operating characteristics of the nation's highways. The major purpose of the HPMS is to support a data driven decision process within FHWA, DOT, and Congress [for legislative and funding purposes]. HPMS is a nationally unique source of high- way system information that is made available to the transportation community for highway and transportation planning and other purposes through the annual Highway Statistics and other data dissemination media." The latest annual edition of HPMS at the time of this writing is 2006. Usually, the file can be obtained by regions and localities that contact the local office of the State Department of Trans- portation. Segment attributes of interest include truck route designation, and the percent daily or peak-hour traffic that are combination trucks. An in-house exercise of considerable expertise and resources will have to be conducted by the region or locality to extract the segment data of need from the larger database if a custom-made dataset is not readily provided by the local state DOT office. A more user friendly alternative is the HPMS Map Viewer in the above link that enables selection of truck routes to the traffic network level showing truck routes and overall traf- fic volumes (not truck specific). The viewer also displays population demographic information. 7. 2002 Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS), Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce. Web site: http://www.census.gov/svsd/www/vius/2002.html According to the program documentation provided on the Web site, VIUS "provides data on the physical and operational characteristics of the nation's truck population. Its primary goal is to produce national and state-level estimates of the total number of trucks. . . . [It] is a probabil- ity sample of all private and commercial trucks registered (or licensed) in the United States . . . [and] excludes vehicles owned by federal, state, or local governments; ambulances; buses; motor

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Electronic Database and Report Descriptions G-5 homes; farm tractors; and non-powered trailer units." Additionally, trucks that were included in the sample but reported to have been sold, junked, or wrecked prior to the survey year (date varies) were deemed out of scope. The sampling frame was stratified by geography and truck characteristics. The 50 states and the District of Columbia made up the 51 geographic strata. Body type and gross vehicle weight (GVW) determined the following five truck strata: 1. Pickups; 2. Minivans, other light vans, and sport utilities; 3. Light single-unit trucks (GVW 26,000 lbs. or less); 4. Heavy single-unit trucks (GVW 26,001 lbs. or more); and 5. Truck-tractors. Therefore, the sampling frame was partitioned into 255 geographic-by-truck strata. Within each stratum, a simple random sample of truck registrations was selected without replace- ment. Samples are available for nine different years between (and including) 1963 and 2002. The 2002 year had a sample of 136,113 trucks. As of this report date, the VIUS sample has been discontinued. 8. Safety and Fitness Electronic Records System Company Snapshot, FMCSA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://safer.fmcsa.dot.gov/CompanySnapshot.aspx "The Company Snapshot is a concise electronic record of a company's identification, size, commodity information, and safety record, including the safety rating (if any), a roadside out- of-service inspection summary, and crash information." Database users can search by company name, U.S.DOT Number, or FMCSA MC/MX number. It is a very useful tool for local entities desiring to identify inspection and safety statistics about hazmat transporters. 9. Company Registration Look-Up Tool, Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS), PHMSA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://www.phmsa.dot.gov/hazmat/registration "Offerors and transporters of certain quantities and types of hazardous materials, including hazardous wastes, are required to file an annual registration statement with the U.S.DOT and to pay a fee that provides funds for grants distributed to states and Indian tribes for hazmat emer- gency response planning and training." Any user can search for a company's registration history and view the certificates through the Company Registration Look-Up tool. The minimum require- ment is a zip code but one can also search by company name, existing PHMSA registration num- ber, U.S.DOT Number, or FMCSA MC/MX number, if available. It is a very useful tool for local entities that want to locate hazmat transporters based in their area. 10. Carload Waybill Sample, Surface Transportation Board (STB), U.S.DOT. Web site: http://www.stb.dot.gov/stb/industry/econ_waybill.html STB's Carload Waybill Sample "is a stratified sample of carload waybills" for terminated ship- ments by railroad carriers. These waybill data are used to create a movement-specific Confiden- tial Waybill File and a less detailed Public Use Waybill File. The elements and the file structure for both the Confidential File and the Public Use File are described in the user guide, which is available for download from the Web site, as is the Public Use Waybill File.

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G-6 Guidebook for Conducting Local Hazardous Materials Commodity Flow Studies The sample includes waybill information from Class I, Class II, and some of the Class III rail- roads. STB requires that these railroads submit waybill samples if, in any of the 3 preceding years, they terminated on their lines at least 4,500 revenue carloads. The waybill sample currently encompasses over 99 percent of all U.S. rail traffic. It is a continuous sample that is released in yearly segments. For the past several years, it has contained information on approximately 600,000 movements. Data from the Master Waybill Sample File are used as input to many STB projects, analyses, and studies. Federal agencies (DOT, Department of Agriculture, etc.) use the waybill sample as part of their information base. The waybill sample is also used by states as a major source of infor- mation for developing state transportation plans. In addition, non-government groups seek access to waybill sample data for such uses as market surveys, development of verified statements in STB and state formal proceedings, forecast of rail equipment requirements, economic analy- sis and forecasts, academic research, etc. The Master Waybill File contains sensitive shipping and revenue information, so access is restricted to railroads; federal agencies; the states; transportation practitioners, consultants and law firms with formal proceedings before the STB or state boards; and certain other users. Any- one can access the non-confidential data in the Public Use File by downloading it from the Web site or sending a written request to STB. The Public Use File only provides an indication of the presence of a hazardous commodity in the car as hazardous via an "H" designation in the field for Hazardous/Bulk Material in Boxcar, and the 5-digit STCC of the commodity, that would only indicate the hazard class and division (at best). STCC codes at the 7-digit level that would identify the chemical name of the hazardous material are not provided in the Public Use File. The Confidential Waybill File however does provide the STCC hazmat code at the 7-digit level as well as the 49xxxxx series railroad code specifically for hazardous commodities in the Hazardous/Bulk Material in Boxcar field. In addi- tion, the public file only indicates the origin and termination BEA (business economic area) whereas the confidential file disaggregates origins and terminations to the MSA (metropolitan statistical area) or county level, which is more appropriate for local use. Depending on the resources available for conducting a CFS and the level of detail a community desires in it, it may decide to go into the legal and technical trouble of obtaining and analyzing the Confidential Waybill File. However, it might be more resource efficient to simply request commodity flow information on the top 10 hazardous materials transported through the area from the operating railroad(s). 11. Rail Safety Data, Office of Safety Analysis, FRA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://safetydata.fra.dot.gov/officeofsafety/Default.asp The FRA Office of Safety Analysis Web site makes railroad safety information readily avail- able to a broad constituency, including FRA personnel, railroad companies, research and plan- ning organizations, and the general public. Visitors have access to railroad safety information including accidents and incidents, inspections and highwayrail crossing data. From this site users can run dynamic queries, download a variety of safety database files, publications, and forms, and view current statistical information on railroad safety. Dynamic queries dating back to 1978 can be run for accident/incident data for individual railroads, by railroad group, by region, state, or county, and for any multi-annual, annual, multi-monthly, or monthly time- frame. An online report is created and displayed that contains the number of cars that released hazardous material and the number of cars that released hazardous material as a result of dam- age or derailment. Additional queries offer further constraints, such as accident cause, type, dam- age, or the hazmat option. Constraints under the hazmat option include cars carrying hazardous

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Electronic Database and Report Descriptions G-7 material, cars carrying hazardous material that were damaged, cars that released hazardous material, or if evacuation occurred. The geographic detail lends itself to use in regional/local CFS since it goes down to the county and railroad line levels. However, FRA accident/incident data do not contain any information on the quantities, classes, or chemical names of the hazardous materials released. The PHMSA HMIRS database is a more detailed source for hazmat incident data. 12. Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS) National Pipeline Mapping System. PHMSA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://www.phmsa.dot.gov/pipeline OPS, through the Pipeline Safety Community portal of the PHMSA Web site, makes available gas and liquid pipeline maps down to the street level, through the National Pipeline Mapping System (www.npms.phmsa.dot.gov/). The OPS Web site also provides pipeline incident and mileage profiles by state and county, and by aggregate commodity (hazardous liquid or natural gas). The user can click on the button or link for the NPMS Public Map Viewer. The maps include information about gas transmission lines and hazardous liquid trunk lines but do not contain gathering and distribution pipelines. The mapping application requires selection of the state and county for which a map is desired. The map output allows the user to zoom in or zoom out, iden- tify particular pipelines by type and operator, and includes contact information. However, indi- vidual operators will have to be contacted in order to obtain the levels of flow of a given pipeline through a region/locality. Users should make sure that pop-ups are allowed by their browsers, and using web browsers other than Microsoft Internet Explorer may limit visibility of information. The National Pipeline Mapping System also operates a secured access repository of pipeline data. Local, state, and federal government officials may request access to these data by sending requests to npms-nr@mbakercorp.com with "Pipeline Data Request" in the subject line, and including name, title, organization, mailing address, phone number, fax number, and e-mail address. Applicants are screened to ensure they are qualified to access NPMS data; more infor- mation is available on the Web site. 13. Significant Incident Data Access Page. PHMSA, U.S. DOT. Web site: http://primis.phmsa.dot.gov/comm/reports/safety/SIDA.html As part of PHMSA's Pipeline Safety Program, pipeline incident report data files are made available to the public. The Web site contains a link to current incident data files that are used to create Pipeline Incidents and Mileage Reports (also linked at the site), and have been flagged by PHMSA as follows: "(1) they have been flagged to indicate incident significance, (2) they have been flagged to indicate fire-first gas distribution incidents, and (3) they include indexed costs in addition to raw (nominal) costs to indicate the significance of the pipeline incidents." Links to previous incident files also are provided, and the Web site notes that all reported incidents are provided, not only significant and fire-first incidents as indicated for current incident data files. 14. Hazardous Commodity Code Cross-Reference File, Navigation Data Center (NDC), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). Web site: http://www.iwr.usace.army.mil/ndc/data/datahazc.htm USACE developed a Hazardous Commodity Code Cross-Reference File "in an effort to asso- ciate the Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center (WCSC) Commodity Codes, which are based on the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC), with hazardous commodity codes

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G-8 Guidebook for Conducting Local Hazardous Materials Commodity Flow Studies used by other federal agencies and internationally." WCSC codes were matched with North American Emergency Response Guide (NAERG) guide numbers and hazard classes. These consist of the United Nations' (UN) Hazard Identification Codes used worldwide to track international hazardous material cargoes and a number of general codes to cover hazardous materials not specified by the UN Codes. A further effort interrelates the WCSC Commodity Codes with the USCG Chemical Hazard Response Information System (CHRIS) Codes, the NAERG Hazard Identification Numbers, and Chemical Abstract Service Registry Numbers (CAS). CHRIS Numbers "are used domestically by the U.S. shipping industry and the USCG to designate hazardous cargo moving by vessel. The CAS Registry is the worldwide definitive chemical identification system." Both of these files are also publicly available for download through the NDC Web site. 15. Marine Casualty and Pollution Database, Marine Information for Safety and Law Enforcement (MISLE), Marine Safety Management System, U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). Web site: http://transtats.bts.gov/Tables.asp?DB_ID=610&DB_Name=Marine%20Casualty%20 And%20Pollution%20Database&DB_Short_Name=Marine%20Casualty/Pollution The Marine Casualty and Pollution Database contains data related to marine casualty inves- tigations and pollution investigations by the U.S. Coast Guard concerning vessel and waterfront facility accidents and marine pollution incidents throughout the United States and its territo- ries. The data-current data, user guide, and data dictionary are posted on the web. The data are contained in nine (text) files and are publicly available on CD-ROM upon request from the USCG through the Bureau of Transportation Statistics Web site. MISLE provides comprehen- sive information on all waterway incidents and accidents and lend themselves to diversified analysis purposes. Records can be joined and filtered to satisfy a variety of objectives to a low level of geographic detail. At least an elementary level of software and database analysis skills is required because the records are in comma delimited text format and need to be imported into a spreadsheet or database application for analysis. 16. United States Census 2000, Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC). Web site: http://www.census.gov/ The Census Bureau collects, compiles, analyzes, and makes publicly available national data through the Population and Housing Census (every 10 years), the Economic Census (every 5 years), the American Community Survey (annually), several other surveys (both demographic and eco- nomic), and economic indicators (each released on a specific schedule). The topics range from data on people and households (housing, income, poverty, etc.) to data on business and industry (trade, employment, economic indicators). The output format ranges from on-screen data and map output to geographic data (i.e., GIS maps--shapefiles) that are already prepared or custom made. The data can be queried at the state, county, or census tract level via a simple zip code entry. The most recent U.S. Census was in 2000; the 2010 Census is underway at the time of this writ- ing. GIS-based maps would require a desktop GIS but are an invaluable tool for hotspots analy- ses. Overall, the Census Bureau Web site is a valuable source of data, especially in creating a community's profile for inclusion in the CFS document and overall support of local CFS efforts. 17. The National Map, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Web site: http://nationalmap.gov/

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Electronic Database and Report Descriptions G-9 USGS collaborates with other federal, state, and local partners to improve and deliver topo- graphic information in the form of the National Map. It can be used for many purposes includ- ing scientific analysis, recreation, and emergency response. It is accessible for display via the Web or as downloadable data for use locally. Information available includes elevation, hydrography, orthoimagery, boundaries, transportation, structures, and land cover. Additional geographic information can be added either through the viewer or integrated with the National Map data in a GIS. The GIS-based maps require a desktop GIS but are an invaluable tool for hotspots analy- ses. Overall, the National Map is a valuable source of data, especially in creating a geographic profile for inclusion in the CFS document and overall support of local CFS efforts. 18. Web Soil Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. Web site: http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov/app/HomePage.htm The Web Soil Survey provides soil data and information produced by the National Coopera- tive Soil Survey. Operated by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) the Web Soil Survey accesses the largest natural resource information system in the world. NRCS soil maps and data for more than 3,000 counties are available online. Updated and maintained online, the Web Soil Survey is the single authoritative source of soil survey information. Soil sur- vey data such as soil type, topographic, and ecological data can be used for local and wide-area planning as well as emergency planning and response. The Web Soil Survey provides a useful resource for attaining soil information pertinent to hazmat spills for inclusion in the HMCFS document. 19. National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Web site: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/ncdc.html The National Climatic Data Center of the U.S. Department of Commerce and NOAA provide land- and marine-based data about upper air-flows, weather and climate patterns and events, paleoclimatology, and satellite imagery. These data are summarized monthly and annually; unedited weather station data for the United States also is provided. Products include extreme weather and climate events, climate normals, storm database, and climate maps of the United States. These data may require desktop GIS, but some are available as maps. Overall, the NCDC/NOAA Web site is a valuable resource for climate data for areas of the United States. These data provide use- ful profiles for inclusion in the CFS document and overall support of CFS efforts. G.2 Electronic Report Source Descriptions The following sections provide descriptive information about electronic report sources. Descriptive material for each source is attributable to the referenced Web pages. 1. United States 2007 Commodity Flow Survey, BTS, U.S.DOT, and Economics and Statistics Administration, Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce, December 2009. Web site: From BTS: The majority of 2007 CFS data products are made available only via elec- tronic media released on the BTS Web site, http://www.bts.gov/publications/commodity_flow_

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G-10 Guidebook for Conducting Local Hazardous Materials Commodity Flow Studies survey/, or the Census Bureau's American FactFinder Web site at www.factfinder.census.gov. The final data release includes only three printed publications at the national level. These reports include national-level data for the United States, hazardous materials, and exports. The CFS is a primary data source in the world of freight transportation. It is conducted every 5 years. The data from the 2007 survey were released in December 2009. The industry sectors surveyed include manufacturing, mining, wholesale, and select retail. The hazmat transportation series of the data provides information--at a national level--on hazmat shipments by mode (tonnage, value, and ton-miles shipped), class/division, UN num- ber, origin and destination state, interstate and intrastate transport, toxic inhalation hazards, packing groups, and other categories and various combinations of these categories (e.g., mode by hazard class/division). Additional CFS sections report on all commodities originating from individual states, not just hazardous materials at the national level. Shipment value, tons, and ton-miles originating in the state are reported by mode, distance, and weight of shipment; by two-digit commodity code (Standard Classification of Transported Goods [SCTG]) and mode; and by state of destination. In the SCTG section, the codes most heavily populated with haz- ardous materials are 17 (Gasoline and Aviation Turbine Fuel), 18 (Fuel Oils), 19 (Coal and Petroleum Products), 20 (Basic Chemicals), and 23 (Chemical Products and Preparations). Overall, the lowest level of detail in the hazmat section of the CFS is the state level, which on its own cannot support analyses at the regional or local level. Also, detailed information on chemicals or routes used cannot be gleaned. The latest CFS can be consulted in order to develop a good sense of the hazmat shipment characteristics to and from the entire state. Data from the 2002 survey and 1997 survey are available as well and can be used to identify general changes in hazmat transportation characteristics over time. 2. National Statistics and Maps, Freight Management and Operations, FHWA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/freight_analysis/nat_freight_stats/index.htm This webpage contains several links related to freight transportation, including a link to the FAF, several FAF by-products, and links to external sites such as BTS. Freight Facts and Figures is an annual publication that culminates from the FAF data and pro- jections as they are updated annually. Individual sections can be viewed online (html), or it can be downloaded in its entirety in Adobe Acrobat format. It consists of tables and figures in the form of charts or maps. This publication is a "snapshot of the volume and value of freight flows in the United States, the physical network over which freight moves, the economic conditions that generate freight movements, the industry that carries freight, and the safety, energy, and environmental implications of freight transportation. This snapshot helps decision makers, plan- ners, and the public understand the magnitude and importance of freight transportation in the economy. Chapter 1 summarizes basic demographic and economic characteristics of the United States that contribute to the demand for raw materials, intermediate goods, and finished products. Chapter 2 identifies the freight that is moved and the trading partners who move it. Chapter 3 describes the freight transportation system; volumes of freight moving over the system; the amount of truck, train, and other activities required to move the freight; and the performance of the system. Chapter 4 highlights the transportation industry that operates the system. Chap- ter 5 covers the safety aspects, energy consumption, and environmental implications of freight transportation. Many of the tables and figures are based on the Economic Census, which is con- ducted once every 5 years. The most recently published data from the Economic Census are for

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Electronic Database and Report Descriptions G-11 2007. Several of the tables and maps in this report are based on the FAF, version 2.2, which builds on the Economic Census, to estimate all freight flows to, from, and within the United States except shipments between foreign countries that are transported through the United States." The National Freight Transportation Maps in Freight Facts and Figures are also made available independently on the main Web page for download in html, jpg, or pdf format. Freight Facts and Figures is primarily applicable to the national and, sometimes, regional levels. However, the main Web page provides links to freight profiles (statistics and maps) of individual states. FAF-based statistics are output directly in html or pdf format, whereas external information links the user to other FHWA offices such as BTS, the Census Bureau, or state-specific Web sites such as DOTs. Additional links also provide access to other internal or external publications and resources related to freight transportation, including links to the source of the freight statistics and maps, for example the FAF (FHWA), CFS (BTS), and Carload Waybill Sample (STB). 3. Freight Data and Statistics, BTS, RITA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://www.bts.gov/programs/freight_transportation/ The BTS Web site provides several publicly available reports for download. They are developed based on individual data sources or databases already discussed and are primarily based on the 2002 Commodity Flow Survey. However, users may find access to the same freight data through the BTS portal to be more concise, concentrated, structured, and ultimately more user friendly. 4. Accident Reports, NTSB. Web site: http://www.ntsb.gov/Publictn/publictn.htm The NTSB Web site provides publicly available reports for aviation, highway, marine, pipeline, hazardous materials, and railroad accidents. Each report summarizes accidents of national signif- icance that were evaluated by the NTSB. Information in the reports includes an incident overview, parties involved, conditions, causation, mitigating factors, and outcomes (including fatalities, injuries, and property damages). 5. Crash Statistics, Analysis & Information Online (A&I), FMCSA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/CrashProfile/CrashProfileMainNew.asp Crash Statistics "are summarized crash statistics for large trucks and buses involved in fatal and non-fatal crashes that occurred in the United States. They are derived from two databases: the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) and the Motor Carrier Management Information Sys- tem (MCMIS)." They are compiled through SAFETYNET, a database management system that allows entry, access, analysis, and reporting of data from driver/vehicle inspections, crashes, com- pliance reviews, assignments, and complaints that have been entered online by state agencies. Access to the actual data is restricted to authorized users (e.g., state and federal government agencies). However, compilations of Crash Statistics data are made publicly available online. They contain information that can be used to identify safety problems in specific geographical areas or to compare state statistics to the national crash figures. The statistics are represented in state profile summaries in the following focus areas: Summary, Vehicle, Driver, Environment, Crash, Carrier, and Maps. Historical State Profiles are provided for the most recent 5 years and feature dynamic colorful state maps highlighting the large truck crash location data. National Crash Profile Reports (and maps) are also available online.

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G-12 Guidebook for Conducting Local Hazardous Materials Commodity Flow Studies The Vehicle area of the state profiles includes a hazmat report that summarizes crashes by presence or absence of a hazmat placard on the truck, by whether a release occurred or not, and by hazmat class (if released). The state profile summaries include total number of large trucks involved in crashes in the last 5 years, by county. Generally though, the lowest level of geographic detail is the state level, and the lowest level of commodity release detail is the class of hazmat as opposed to chemical name--both of which may limit support for route/local/regional analyses and emergency response plans. The PHMSA HMIRS database remains the most detailed source for hazmat incident data. 6. Waterborne Commerce of the United States (WCUS), Navigation Data Center (NDC), USACE. Web site: http://www.iwr.usace.army.mil/ndc/index.htm Published annually in five volumes, Volumes 1 through 4 present tonnage and ton-mile infor- mation on domestic and foreign cargo transported over waterways and through harbors on the Atlantic Coast, Gulf Coast/Mississippi River system, Great Lakes, and Pacific Coast, respectively, while Volume 5 presents national summary statistics. All volumes are publicly available online for download through the NDC Web site. All types of commodities moving in domestic water- borne commerce are covered, including more than 20 distinct chemical products. Commodity codes are unique to USACE waterborne data but the classification reflects the hierarchical struc- ture of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). Hazardous materials are not identified specifically or by chemical name by the WCSC codes, but by and large populate the Petroleum & Petroleum Products and Chemicals & Related Products categories. The USACE's 4-digit WCSC code aggregates specific commodities into commodity groups. These 4-digit codes can be further specified using a listing of 5-digit commodity code groups found in the Commod- ity Code Cross Reference File provided by USACE, at www.iwr.usace.army.mil/ndc/data/ datacomm.htm. Finally, the USACE has developed a cross-reference between these 5-digit codes and associated UN Hazard ID (placard number), described in Appendix C.1. 7. Lock Performance Monitoring System (LPMS), NDC, USACE. Web site: http://www.iwr.usace.army.mil/ndc/lpms/lpms.htm The LPMS contains annual commodity tonnage data for all locks on the inland waterways. LPMS data and reports are also publicly available for download through the NDC Web site. In addition, Key Lock Reports are available that include monthly summaries and year-to-date totals of commodity tonnages and barge traffic for key locks. However, commodities are aggregated into only nine classes in LPMS data and reports, an aggregated level of detail. Unlike the WCUS data, the nine classes are not broken down further, but hazardous materials by and large make up the commodities in the Petroleum & Petroleum Products and Chemicals & Related Products categories. 8. Waterborne Transportation Lines of the United States, Vol. 2: Vessel Company Summary, NDC, USACE. Web site: http://www.ndc.iwr.usace.army.mil/veslchar/veslchar.htm USACE publishes a vessel company summary as part of its Waterborne Transportation Lines of the United States report, which can be found at www.ndc.iwr.usace.army.mil/veslchar/ veslchar.htm. The summary lists vessel company names, contact information, commodities car- ried, locations of vessel operation, and operating fleet size. Users can identify which companies

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Electronic Database and Report Descriptions G-13 may be operating in their areas, and what products they are carrying and whether they are likely to be hazardous. These companies can then be contacted to request information on specific com- modities and tonnage carried during specific timeframes, such as a previous calendar year. 9. Pipeline Incidents and Mileage Reports. PHMSA, U.S.DOT. Web site: http://primis.phmsa.dot.gov/comm/reports/safety/PSI.html?nocache=7942 Information about pipeline incident trends over a 20-year period are provided in a series of reports on this Web page as part of PHMSA's Pipeline Safety Program. "The reports . . . are gen- erated from numerous data sources maintained by PHMSA. These data sources span decades of collection, evolving methods of oversight, and multiple reporting formats. To generate these reports, PHMSA has standardized the data over various file formats, normalized incident costs over time to a common basis year, and standardized incident cause categories--all with the goal of producing a coherent and meaningful picture of national and state-specific trends in pipeline incidents. . . . In these reports, all the costs associated with incidents are provided in 2010 dol- lars." Links are provided to reports on serious incidents, significant incidents, consequences to the public and the pipeline industry. Also included is a Directory of State Detail Reports, a link to raw data at the significant incident data access, and tables and charts summarizing all reported incidents.