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36 Guidebook for Conducting Local Hazardous Materials Commodity Flow Studies transport relative to population and ecological vulnerability and risks. These organizations include, but are not limited to, the following: Pipeline Safety Trust (http://www.pstrust.org/), a pipeline safety advocacy organization that maintains information about pipeline operations safety and databases of hazardous liquids and natural gas pipeline incidents; Sierra Club (http://www.sierraclub.org); National Resources Defense Council (http://www.nrdc.org); and Communities for a Better Environment (http://www.cbecal.org). 4.2.6 Printed Maps and Academic Journals Print maps can be a source of transportation network information that may be used when mapping using electronic data is not an option. These sources include the following: Rand McNally's Motor Carriers' Road Atlas is available at retail outlets and on the Internet at http://store.randmcnally.com. Print railroad system maps are available from DeskMap Systems, Inc. Pricing and map avail- ability information can be found online at http://www.deskmap.com/railroad.html. Pennwell Books' MAPSearch (http://www.pennwellbooks.com/mapsearch.html) is a print mapping source for pipeline systems. Print maps of the waterway system can be ordered from the U.S. Maritime Administration on the Internet at http://www.marad.dot.gov/index.htm. Academic journals publish studies conducted by researchers, such as college and university faculty members, government employees, and private-sector employees including those of industries and consulting firms. Some of this research may specifically focus on transport of hazardous materials; other research may be more general and concern transportation and com- modity movements. Access to academic journals may be by subscription, purchase of individual articles, via Internet search engines, or through college and university libraries. There are many academic journals, and those with information about hazmat transportation may include, but are not limited to, the following: Hazardous Materials Control, International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, International Journal of Risk Analysis, Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Journal of Hazardous Materials, Journal of Transportation Safety and Security, Transportation Research (there are several parts), and Transportation Research Record. 4.3 Electronic Databases and Reports The project team can use existing electronic data sources to cover a wide variety of HMCFS information areas. Table 4-1 lists electronic database and mapping sources, and Table 4-2 lists electronic reports and other documents. The sources in these tables are maintained by federal agencies. Mode applicability is indicated for highways, railways, pipelines, waterways, airways, and other classifications. Check marks indicate that a source provides information about transport networks, commodity movements, general system information (such as traffic levels, popula- tion and critical facility locations), incidents, points of contact, and geographical and environ- mental data. Both Tables 4-1 and 4-2 indicate the smallest jurisdictional size applicability by local, regional/state, and national scale levels. General relevance to local hazmat transport is indicated

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Collect and Review Existing Data 37 Table 4-1. HMCFS electronic database and mapping sources. Information Type Technical Expertise Level Smallest Jurisdiction Size Local Hazmat Relevance Commodity Movements Environmental Data System Information Population, Critical Facility Locations Point of Contact Geographic and Applicability Networks Incidents Mode(s) Source Notes H, R, W, P, A, O (facilities, Spatial data, for use with a FEMA HAZUS-MH Software L H H critical desktop GIS infrastr., population) Spatial data, for use with a FHWA Freight Analysis Framework H, R, W, P, M R/S L desktop GIS; datasets can be (updated annually) A H accessed independently H, R, W, A, BTS National Transportation Atlas Database O Spatial data, for use with a L H H (updated annually) (critical desktop GIS infrastr.) PHMSA Incidents Reports Database Search New online search system; can H, R, W, A L H L Web Page (updated continuously) query incidents by many criteria FMCSA National Hazardous Materials List and map formats; only PC Route Registry and Route Maps H L H L and browser required (updated periodically) FHWA Highway Performance Monitoring M Dataset not readily available; H L L System (updated annually) H online map viewer is available U.S. Census Bureau Vehicle Inventory and H N L L Data summarized in Appendix H Use Survey Online search for highway FMCSA SAFER Company Snapshot H L M L carrier incident, inspection, and safety statistics PHMSA Company Registration Look-Up Online search for information on H L L L Tool hazmat carriers Issues: confidential file STB Carload Waybill Sample M R S H accessibility; high level of (updated annually) H expertise required FRA Rail Safety Data R L M L Hazmat detail very limited (updated annually) Gas or liquid pipeline map PHMSA National Pipeline Mapping System P L H L display by state, county, or zip (updated periodically) code PHMSA Significant Incident Data Access Raw data and summary reports P L H L Web Page available for pipeline incidents Useful for evaluation of USACE USACE Hazardous Commodity Code Cross- W All H H waterway data for corresponding Reference File UN/NA placard ID (continued on next page)

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38 Guidebook for Conducting Local Hazardous Materials Commodity Flow Studies Table 4-1. (Continued). Information Type Technical Expertise Level Smallest Jurisdiction Size Local Hazmat Relevance Commodity Movements Environmental Data System Information Population, Critical Facility Locations Point of Contact Geographic and Applicability Networks Incidents Mode(s) Source Notes Waterway hazmat incidents are USCG Marine Casualty and Pollution the rarest; required level of W L H H Database (latest incident year 2001) expertise not justified in most cases U.S. Census Bureau Census O L Useful for community profiles; L H (updated every 10 years) (population) H spatial data requires GIS O L USGS National Map L H Topography and land-cover data (topography) H O (soil, Soil type, topographic, and USDA Web Soil Survey L H L topography) ecological data NOAA National Climatic Data Center O (climate) L H L Climate data charts and tables Note: Letter designations for mode delineate highways (H), railways (R), pipelines (P), waterways (W), airways (A), and other (O); for smallest jurisdictional size applicability refer to local (L), regional/state (R/S), and national (N) scale levels; and for relevance to local hazmat transport and for required technical expertise use low (L), medium (M), and high (H) levels. by low, medium, and high levels. Required technical expertise for using the information source also is indicated by low, medium, and high levels. Notes about using the information source are provided. These databases and reports are further described in Appendix G.1 and G.2. The tables are ordered by the modes and information types covered in the data sources. These sources of information include the following: Electronic database and mapping sources HAZUS-MH software from DHS, FEMA; Freight Analysis Framework (FAF) from U.S.DOT, FHWA, Office of Freight Management and Operations; National Transportation Atlas Database (NTAD) from U.S.DOT, BTS, Research and Inno- vative Technology Administration; Hazardous Materials Incidents Reports Database from U.S.DOT, PHMSA, Office of Haz- ardous Materials Safety; National Hazardous Materials Route Registry and Route Maps from U.S.DOT, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA); Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) from U.S.DOT, FHWA; Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS) from U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, U.S. Census Bureau; Safety and Fitness Electronic Records System (SAFER) Company Snapshot from U.S.DOT, FMCSA; Company Registration Look-Up Tool from U.S.DOT, PHMSA, Office of Pipeline Safety; Carload Waybill Sample from U.S.DOT, Surface Transportation Board (STB); Rail safety data from U.S.DOT, FRA, Office of Safety; National Pipeline Mapping System (NPMS) from U.S.DOT, PHMSA, Office of Pipeline Safety;

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Collect and Review Existing Data 39 Table 4-2. HMCFS electronic reports and other data sources. Information Type Required Technical Expertise Smallest Jurisdiction Size Local Hazmat Relevance Commodity Movements Population and Critical System Information Facility Locations Point of Contact Applicability Networks Incidents Mode(s) Source Notes Comprehensive source of FHWA National Statistics and Maps H,R,W,P,A S, N M L information applicable to national and state levels BTS & U.S. Census Bureau Commodity S, N (for Hazmat section only to national & H,R,W,P,A M L Flow Survey (updated every 5 years) hazmat) state levels BTS Freight Data and Statistics Reports compiled from individual H,R,W,P,A S M L (updated annually) data sources (e.g., CFS) Reports summarizing initiating events and outcomes for NTSB Accident Reports H,R,W,P,A L H L significant accidents from all modes; includes accidents involving hazmat FMCSA Crash Statistics H L, S M L Hazmat detail limited to class (updated annually) Commodity groups aggregated; USACE Waterborne Commerce of the U.S. most hazmat tonnage is in W L M L Reports (updated annually) Petroleum and Chemicals categories Commodity groups aggregated; USACE Lock Performance Monitoring most hazmat tonnage is in W L M L System (updated annually) Petroleum and Chemicals categories Lists type of vessels and USACE Waterborne Transportation Lines of W L M L commodity types carried by the United States, Vessel Company Summary company for waterway segments Includes pipeline trends and information for serious and PHMSA Pipeline Incidents and Mileage P L, S H L significant incidents, impacts, Reports Web Page mileage by state, summary tables and charts, and access to raw data Note: Letter designations for mode delineate highways (H), railways (R), pipelines (P), waterways (W), airways (A), and other (O); for smallest jurisdictional size applicability refer to local (L), regional/state (R/S), and national (N) scale levels; and for relevance to local hazmat transport and for required technical expertise use low (L), medium (M), and high (H) levels. Significant Incident Data Access Web page from U.S.DOT, PHMSA, Office of Pipeline Safety; Hazardous Commodity Code Cross-Reference File from USACE, Institute for Water Resources (IWR), Navigation Data Center; Marine Casualty and Pollution Database from DHS, United States Coast Guard (USCG); The Census from U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, U.S. Census Bureau;

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40 Guidebook for Conducting Local Hazardous Materials Commodity Flow Studies The National Map from U.S. Department of Interior, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); Web Soil Survey from U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS); and National Climatic Data Center from U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Electronic reports and other documents National statistics and maps from U.S.DOT, FHWA, Office of Freight Management and Operations; The Commodity Flow Survey (CFS) from U.S.DOT, BTS, Research and Innovative Technol- ogy Administration, and U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Admin- istration, U.S. Census Bureau; Freight data and statistics from U.S.DOT, BTS, Research and Innovative Technology Administration; Accident reports from NTSB; Crash statistics from U.S.DOT, FMCSA; Waterborne Commerce of the United States reports from USACE, IWR, Navigation Data Center; Lock Performance Monitoring System reports from USACE, IWR, Navigation Data Center; Waterborne Transportation Lines of the United States, Vol. 2: Vessel Company Summary from USACE, IWR, Navigation Data Center; and Pipeline Incidents and Mileage Reports Web page from U.S.DOT, PHMSA, Office of Pipeline Safety. 4.3.1 Transportation Networks Identifying the routes (i.e., railways, roadways, waterways, pipelines, and airways) in a jurisdic- tion that are capable of transporting hazardous materials is an important step in conducting an HMCFS. Because not all routes are equally likely to carry hazardous materials, determining which routes are most likely to carry hazmat transport establishes priorities for the HMCFS. 4.3.2 Commodity Movements Commodity movement information covers what commodities are transported from location to location. The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) and U.S. Census Bureau's Commodity Flow Survey (CFS) is one of the most well known, comprehensive national sources of this data. The U.S. Census Bureau also conducted the 2002 Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS), which includes information about hazardous material transport by different types of truck con- figurations. The 2002 VIUS national-level data were compiled and summarized for this guide- book (Appendix H). This information can be useful for a very general understanding of hazmat transport in a community. It also can be used in conjunction with new data for truck counts. Again, remember that much of the existing federal commodity movement information pub- lished in these sources is not directly applicable to many local transportation network segments. This is because the information is reported at the state level or higher, because the data are not appropriately sampled for application at the local or regional levels, and/or the aggregation of commodity groups limits identification of specific material hazards below class level. 4.3.3 System Information (Traffic) Transportation system information covers performance of the transportation network (i.e., traffic levels on network segments). Although this information is not specific to commodity movements, it can help prioritize network components for consideration in an HMCFS. Some sources may be based on model estimates rather than observed traffic levels.