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25 400 Total 350 Highway Participants Completing Survey 300 250 200 150 100 50 Marine Rail Air Unknown 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Week of Data Collection Figure 3-3. Data collection progress by mode. described their role in the transportation of hazardous ma- is expected based on the nature of those credentials. Like- terials. Of the 378 respondents, 307 provided answers to this wise, marine respondents also held the FUPAC, MMC, MMD, question. Responses represented a wide range of professions and MML. (business owners, commercial truck drivers, port police) and supervisory responsibility (line workers such as railroad engi- Total Time to Obtain Credentials neers, administrators in charge of port operations and secu- rity). Figure 3-4 provides a summary of the categories of roles Figure 3-11 provides a summary of the total time respon- that respondents indicated they held. dents needed to obtain their credentials, from completion of Most respondents worked in the highway/tractor trailer the application process through physical receipt of the creden- mode (93.8%; 345 respondents). There were 12% (44 respon- tial. The majority of respondents completed the application dents) who worked in the marine mode, 8.4% (31 respon- process and received their credential within 2 months (81.5%). dents) worked in the rail mode, and 5.7% (21 respondents) Respondents provided an assessment of the total time needed reported that they worked in the air mode. Please note that to complete the application process and receive their credentials. some respondents chose multiple modes, thus the totals sum Almost 40% of respondents considered that the time needed to to more than 100%. obtain the credential was adequate. However, a combined Questionnaire respondents were asked to indicate whether 59.3% believed that the process took too long (39.1%) or way they held a number of credentials. Of the 364 respondents (out too long (20.2%). Only six respondents (1%) believed that the of 378 total respondents) who answered this question, 88.7% process was too short (Figure 3-12). A crosstab of the number (323 respondents) held a CDL-HME and 67.9% (247 respon- of respondents reporting too long, way too long, and times to dents) held a TWIC. The FAST credential was held by 14.3% obtain a credential can be found in Appendix D. (52 respondents), and 14.8% (54 respondents) reported hold- ing an "other" credential. Figure 3-5 provides a summary of the Time to Complete Application credentials held. Respondents were asked what other creden- tials were required for their jobs. Additionally, individuals were Respondents were asked to provide an estimate of the asked to provide feedback on the other credentials held. Fig- amount of time it took to complete the application process ure 3-6 illustrates those credentials for which individuals pro- (i.e., from the time they started the application to the time vided additional feedback. Credentials also were examined by the application was provided to the credentialing agency). mode. Figures 3-7 through 3-10 provide a breakdown of cre- The majority of respondents (63.2%; 361 respondents) (Fig- dentials held by mode. The majority of highway/tractor- ure 3-13) completed and submitted the application in less trailer respondents held a CDL-HME and/or the TWIC. This than 2 hours. However, 8.1% (46 respondents) indicated that

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26 Truck Drivers 152 Safety Managers, Directors, Supervisors 53 Non-safety Managers, Directors, Supervisors 30 Handling & Delivery of HazMat - Not Included Elsewhere 25 Private Industry Owners or Managements 12 Safety (No Further Clarification) 5 Respondents' Titles Private Security Contractors & Consultants 5 Port Security/Escorts 5 Trucking Carriers 5 Dispatchers 4 Tankermen (Marine) 3 Locomotive Engineers 3 N/A - Does Not Transport HM 2 Government Agency Representatives 2 Marine Engineer 1 0 50 100 150 200 Response Count Figure 3-4. Administrators' roles in the transportation process. 350 323 Response Count 300 247 250 200 150 100 52 54 50 8 4 4 3 1 0 7 0 Credential Figure 3-5. Credentials held by respondents.

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27 Passport 19 Government or Military Security Clearance or 10 Certificate Law Enforcement Officer or Law Enforcement 5 Provided Certifications Customer or Company Specific Certifications 5 Port Authority Specific Certifications 4 No Current Credential/NA 2 E-Railsafe and E-Safe 2 DOT HazMat Training 2 Criminal History & Security Check 2 CDL with Tank Endorsement 2 State Driver's License 1 Professional Driver 1 Picture ID 1 Canadian Petroleum Products Institute Card 1 0 5 10 15 20 Figure 3-6. Other credentials for which respondents provided feedback. Highway/Tractor-Trailer Mode Response 350 321 25 300 Air Mode Response Count 20 250 227 15 15 200 Count 10 150 10 100 4 52 51 5 3 3 50 1 6 0 0 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Credential Credential Figure 3-7. Credentials held by air mode respondents. Figure 3-8. Credentials held by highway/ tractor-trailer respondents.

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28 50.0% 39.7% 39.1% Respondent Percent 40.0% 50 30.0% Marine Response Count 45 40 38 20.2% % 35 20.0% 30 25 10.0% 20 15 0.2% % 0.8% 15 0.0% 9 10 Way T Too Too Short About Right Too Long Way To oo 2 2 4 4 3 5 0 0 1 Sho ort Long g 0 Perceptions Figure 3-12. Respondents' perceptions regarding total time needed to obtain credential. Credential Figure 3-9. Credentials held by marine respondents. it took 5 or more hours to complete an application, with 1.2% (7 respondents) noting that the application took more than 50 16 hours to complete. Of those indicating that it took more 45 40 than 16 hours to complete the application, three respondents Rail Response Count 35 were referring to the CDL, one was referring to the SIDA, one 30 24 was referring to Department of Defense Security Clearance, 25 20 one was referring to a training certificate, and one was refer- 20 15 ring to a terminal-specific access credential. 10 Respondents also reported their perceptions regarding the 4 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 length of time it took for them to complete and submit their 0 credential applications. As shown in Figure 3-14, most respon- dents (74.9%; 441 respondents) indicated that they believed the time needed to complete the application process was ade- quate. The remaining respondents thought that the application Credential took too long (24.3%; 143 respondents) or way too long (6.3%; Figure 3-10. Credentials held by rail respondents. 37 respondents). Four respondents (0.7%) indicated that the process was too short. As stated, data linking respondent perception to reported time of application can be found in 50.0% Appendix D. 40.0% Response Percent 34.4% 29.5% 30.0% 100.0% Respondent Percent 20.0% 17.6% 80.0% 63 3.2% 9.0% 60.0% 10.0% 5.2% 3.7% 40.0% 28.7% 0.0% 20.0% 6.0% Less 2 to 4 5 to 8 9 to 12 13 to Greater 0.9% % 1.2% than 2 weeks weeks weeks 16 than 16 0.0% weeks weeks weeks ss than 2 to 4 Les 5 to 8 9 to 16 Greateer Time 2h hours hours hours hours than 16 1 hourrs Figure 3-11. Summary of respondents' Time total time needed to obtain credentials. Figure 3-13. Summary of respondents' total time needed to complete the application process.