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APPENDIX K Publicly Announced Aviation Alternative Fuel Projects There have been several announcements of alternative jet fuel projects. These early projects are important because they demonstrate interest from several different stakeholders, including airports, airlines, and fuel producers, in this technology. While it is expected that the number of announced projects will increase over time, following is a representative sample of the type of projects that have been announced. K.1 Rentech--Rialto In the summer of 2009, Rentech, Inc., and Aircraft Service International Group (ASIG) made an agreement with eight airlines to produce 1.5 million gallons of renewable synthetic diesel fuel (RenDiesel) to support ground service equipment at LAX (ATA 2009b). The airlines that have partnered with Rentech are Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Continental Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines, United Airlines, UPS Airlines, and US Airways. Production of RenDiesel is planned to begin in 2012 at a facility in Rialto, CA. Primary feedstock will be urban woody green waste such as yard clippings. K.2 Rentech--Natchez Under the Natchez Project, Rentech, Inc., has made a nonbinding memorandum of under- standing (MOU) with 13 airlines to produce 16,600 barrels of renewable synthetic jet fuel per day (Rentech 2010). The Natchez Project could potentially produce 400 million gallons of syn- thetic fuel per year. The airlines that have partnered with Rentech are Air Canada, AirTran Air- ways, American Airlines, Atlas Air, Delta Air Lines, FedEx Express, JetBlue Airways, Lufthansa German Airlines, Mexicana Airlines, Polar Air Cargo, United Airlines, UPS Airlines, and US Air- ways. The Natchez Project synthetic fuel production will be located at a 450-acre facility in Adams County, MS, near the city of Natchez. This facility will have access to many feedstocks, including petcoke and biomass, and several modes of distribution will be available. K.3 Altair Altair signed a MOU with 14 airlines to produce 75 million gallons of alternative jet fuel and diesel fuel per year (Heim 2009). The airlines that have partnered with Altair are Air Canada, American Airlines, Atlas Air, Delta Air Lines, FedEx Express, JetBlue Airways, Lufthansa Ger- man Airlines, Mexicana Airlines, Polar Air Cargo, United Airlines, UPS Airlines, US Airways, Alaska Airlines, and Hawaiian Airlines. Altair fuel production is planned to begin in the fourth 112

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Publicly Announced Aviation Alternative Fuel Projects 113 quarter of 2012 at the Tesoro refinery in Anacortes, WA (ATA 2009a). Altair's bio-jet fuel will be blended with petroleum-based jet fuel at the Tesoro refinery and piped to SeattleTacoma International Airport for use in aircraft and heavy machinery. The primary feedstock will be Camelina oil. K.4 Solena Solena Group, Inc., has partnered with British Airways PLC to produce 16 million gallons of jet fuel and diesel fuel per year for 10 years (Solena Group 2010). The location of biofuel pro- duction is still undecided, but will potentially be near Dagenham in east London. Construction should begin in 2011, and production is scheduled to begin mid-2014. The facility will report- edly be a waste-to-biofuels plant, using feedstocks such as plastics, paper, and food leftovers. British Airways hopes to recruit other airlines into this venture.