Appendix B

Biographies of Speakers

 (as of June 2012)

DAN BERGLUND

Dan Berglund is the President and CEO of SSTI, a non-profit organization that leads, supports, and strengthens efforts to improve state and regional economies through science, technology, and innovation.

SSTI is the most comprehensive resource available for those involved in technology-based economic development. Leading SSTI since its inception in 1996, Mr. Berglund has helped SSTI develop a nationwide network of practitioners and policymakers dedicated to improving the economy through science and technology. SSTI works with this network to assist states and communities as they build tech-based economies, conduct research on best practices and trends in tech-based economic development, and encourage cooperation among and between state and federal programs.

Prior to joining SSTI, Mr. Berglund worked as a consultant and for the Ohio Department of Development in a variety of positions, including Acting Deputy Director of the Division of Technological Innovation. Mr. Berglund holds a B.A. in Economics and Political Science and a B.A. in History from Ohio University.

DANIEL BISS

Daniel Biss represents the 17th House District in the Illinois General Assembly. Daniel is a former math professor at the University of Chicago and is serving his first term in the House of Representatives. He is currently the Democratic candidate for the Illinois State Senate in the 9th District.

Since he was elected to office in 2010, Daniel has passed legislation on a variety of issues, including environmental policy, high-tech economic growth, political reform, equal rights for individuals with autism and consumer protection. He rapidly emerged as an acknowledged leader on fiscal matters,



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Appendix B Biographies of Speakers (as of June 2012) DAN BERGLUND Dan Berglund is the President and CEO of SSTI, a non-profit organization that leads, supports, and strengthens efforts to improve state and regional economies through science, technology, and innovation. SSTI is the most comprehensive resource available for those involved in technology-based economic development. Leading SSTI since its inception in 1996, Mr. Berglund has helped SSTI develop a nationwide network of practitioners and policymakers dedicated to improving the economy through science and technology. SSTI works with this network to assist states and communities as they build tech-based economies, conduct research on best practices and trends in tech-based economic development, and encourage cooperation among and between state and federal programs. Prior to joining SSTI, Mr. Berglund worked as a consultant and for the Ohio Department of Development in a variety of positions, including Acting Deputy Director of the Division of Technological Innovation. Mr. Berglund holds a B.A. in Economics and Political Science and a B.A. in History from Ohio University. DANIEL BISS Daniel Biss represents the 17th House District in the Illinois General Assembly. Daniel is a former math professor at the University of Chicago and is serving his first term in the House of Representatives. He is currently the Democratic candidate for the Illinois State Senate in the 9th District. Since he was elected to office in 2010, Daniel has passed legislation on a variety of issues, including environmental policy, high-tech economic growth, political reform, equal rights for individuals with autism and consumer protection. He rapidly emerged as an acknowledged leader on fiscal matters, 156

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APPENDIX B 157 pushing both parties to overhaul the budget process to align spending with available revenue while preserving our top priorities. He won an uphill battle to pass legislation that doubled the amount of electronic waste manufacturers are required to recycle. Daniel also played a pivotal role in passing legislation to support Illinois’s high-tech entrepreneurs by tripling investments in Illinois venture capital at no cost to taxpayers, an effort that had stalled in the House in previous years. In just his first term, Daniel has already earned broad acclaim for his leadership and accomplishments. The Illinois Recycling Association recognized Daniel as a Recycling Hero; he won the Legislator of the Year award from the Illinois Association of Park Districts and was given the John W. Maitland Award by the Illinois Biotechnology Industry Organization. Daniel served as a co-chair for a bipartisan working group to explore solutions to address the state’s pension crisis and was recently appointed to chair the state’s Digital Divide Elimination Advisory Committee. Daniel serves on seven House Committees: Higher Education Appropriations, Elementary and Secondary Education Appropriations, Bio- Technology, Consumer Protection, International Trade and Commerce, Personnel and Pensions, and Small Business and Empowerment and Workforce Development. With State Senator Jeff Schoenberg’s retirement at the end of the 2012 legislative session, Daniel is running for the open 9th State Senate district seat. The 9th district includes Golf, Kenilworth, Northfield, Wilmette, and Winnetka, and parts of Evanston, Glencoe, Glenview, Morton Grove, Northbrook and Skokie. Daniel is married to Karin Steinbrueck, a doctoral candidate in history at Northwestern University. Daniel and Karin live in Evanston with their two young children, Elliot and Theodore. Daniel holds a doctorate in mathematics from MIT and an undergraduate degree in mathematics from Harvard University. VAN CROCKER Percy "Van" Crocker brings extensive licensing, partnership, and strategic experience to AuraSense Therapeutics. After a 10-year career in consulting and business development, he joined AuraSense, LLC in 2009 as Vice President of Commercial Development and joined AuraSense Therapeutics in the same role at its founding. From 2006 to 2009, Van was a member of the Healthcare Practice at Booz Allen Hamilton/ Booz & Company, where he engaged Fortune 500 clients in strategic initiatives including corporate restructuring and M&A. Prior to Booz & Company, Van was the first employee and Associate Director of Business Development at NanoInk, Inc., a nanotechnology firm founded by Dr. Chad Mirkin in 2000. While at NanoInk, he closed multiple funded license and co-development partnerships in the

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158 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY pharmaceutical and electronics industries. He was also a member of the senior management team and directed the company's patent portfolio of 100+ filings. Van began his career as a Senior Consultant at Oracle Corporation, where he oversaw the implementation of complex financial software for multiple Fortune 500 corporations. Van holds an MBA with honors in Finance, Management & Strategy and Entrepreneurship from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Commerce from the University of Virginia. ROBERT EASTER Robert A. "Bob" Easter was appointed president-designate of the University of Illinois in March 2012, and will become the University’s 19th president on July 1, 2012. Through June, he will work with outgoing President Michael J. Hogan, leading the University’s campuses in Chicago, Springfield and Urbana-Champaign—with more than 77,000 students, 22,000 faculty, and staff, a $5 billion annual budget, and a nearly $800 million research portfolio. Easter has spent his entire 36-year career as a senior administrator and faculty member on the Urbana-Champaign campus, where he earned his doctorate in animal science in 1976. He was interim chancellor from 2009 to 2011, serving as chief executive officer of the 42,000-student campus, and also has served as interim provost and interim vice chancellor for research. From 2002 to 2009, he was dean of the nationally ranked College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES). Before that, he served for five years as head of the Department of Animal Sciences, where he has been a faculty member since 1976. An expert in swine nutrition, Easter has co-authored a book on swine production and has written more than 90 peer-reviewed articles, 11 book chapters, four monographs and numerous papers for conferences and industry publications. He also has spoken to audiences in the U.S. and 27 foreign countries on swine nutrition. In 2006, he was appointed by President George W. Bush to the Board for International Food and Agricultural Development (BIFAD), and was appointed as interim chair of BIFAD in 2007. He also is a member of the American Society of Animal Science, the British Society of Animal Science, The American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists, The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology and the Illinois Council for Food and Agricultural Research (C-FAR). Reared on a grain and livestock farm in southwest Texas, Easter earned an undergraduate degree in agricultural education in 1970 and a master’s degree in animal nutrition in 1972, both from Texas A&M University. He completed a doctorate in animal science at the University of Illinois in 1976 and immediately joined the Animal Science Department as an assistant professor of swine nutrition and management. He presently holds the rank of Professor.

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APPENDIX B 159 His teaching has been recognized by the Midwest Section of the American Society of Animal Science and at the departmental and college levels. In 1992, Easter received the American Feed Industry Association Award in Nonruminant Nutrition Research from the American Society of Animal Science. In 1994, the University of Illinois College of Agriculture awarded Easter with the prestigious Paul A. Funk Award for contributions to Illinois agriculture. CHRIS FALL Chris Fall is the Director of the International Liaison Office for the Office of Naval Research—Global. Most recently, Chris was the ONR Innovation Fellow, serving as a senior advisor for innovation policy and practice. Because ONR fosters and supports a range of missions from diverse basic research, through development of advanced prototypes, to transition of technology for urgent operational needs—all in one integrated organization—it is a unique model of innovation for the Federal government. As the ONR Innovation Fellow, Chris was the ONR liaison for the Director of Innovation to the rest of government, industry and academia, and he worked both to disseminate the important lessons ONR has learned over a long and distinguished history, and to bring back to ONR the best new ideas in innovation. Chris serves at ONR under the Intergovernmental Personnel Act. He is on loan from the BioEngineering department at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and is on leave as a senior scientist from the biotech company Informed Simplifications. Earlier, Chris earned his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in Neuroscience and completed research fellowships at the University of California at Davis Institute for Theoretical Dynamics and the New York University Center for Neural Sciences. While in Washington, Chris continues part-time research and teaching at Georgetown University, where he is visiting faculty in the Department of Computer Science. JOHN FERNANDEZ John Fernandez serves as SNR Denton’s Innovation Strategy Director and Partner in the Public Policy and Regulation practice. Prior to joining the firm, he served as President Barack Obama's Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Economic Development. As Innovation Strategy Director, John leverages his experience effectively transforming complex organizations to compete in the 21st century global economy. He works closely with the firm's lawyers and professionals to identify and deploy client service solutions that fully capitalize on SNR Denton’s diverse legal expertise, industry thought leadership, global footprint and entrepreneurial spirit. With more than 13 years of executive experience, John has earned a reputation as a strategic thinker and creative problem solver. The United States

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160 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY Senate unanimously confirmed President Obama’s appointment of him in 2009 to head the Economic Development Administration (“EDA”), where John was the chief architect of the administration’s regional innovation strategies. During his tenure, he launched new coordinated federal initiatives to accelerate innovation-based growth strategies, including the “i6 Challenge” and the “Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge.” Additionally, John re-engineered the business processes at the EDA, reducing grant-making decision cycles from 128 business days to less than 20. While at the U.S. Department of Commerce, John represented the United States government at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (“OECD”) where he served as Chairman of the Territorial Development Policy Committee. Prior to his appointment, John led the new development and acquisition team at First Capital Group, an Indiana-based real estate investment firm. He played a critical role in expanding the firm’s regional and national investment footprint. John also served as of counsel for an Indianapolis-based law firm, where he advised private and governmental organizations on economic development, public finance and policy issues. John also served as the mayor of Bloomington, Indiana, from 1996 to 2003. Under his leadership, Bloomington’s economy thrived, despite facing significant changes arising from globalization. John worked with business and Indiana University leaders to launch Bloomington’s Life Sciences Partnership, securing more than $243 million in private investments and creating more than 3,700 jobs. He also developed an aggressive downtown revitalization plan resulting in more than $100 million in new investments. MARK HARRIS Mark Harris joins the Illinois Science & Technology Coalition with more than a decade of experience in government, economic development, and higher education. As President and CEO, Mark is focused on building upon the ISTC’s highly collaborative public-private partnerships to advance Illinois as a hub for research, innovation, and investment. Prior to his leadership with the Coalition, Mark served as a deputy chief of staff for Illinois Governor Pat Quinn and also held senior positions at the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. He also worked as the associate director for the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. Mark currently co-chairs the Illinois Workforce Investment Board’s Entrepreneurship Task Force, which focuses on promoting entrepreneurial education at the state and local level. He is Chilean-American and is fluent in Spanish. Mark holds a B.S. from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and an M.A. from the University of Chicago.

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APPENDIX B 161 HEIDI HATTENDORF Heidi Hattendorf is the Director of Innovation Development at Motorola Solutions in the Emerging Business Office, part of the Chief Technology Office. She brings over 20 years experience in Telecoms from Public Safety and two-way radio to consumer mobile phones and network solutions on 3G/4G. Heidi led several new business areas and managed from customer requirements to product development through to promotion including full P&L management. She has an undergraduate degree in Business and an MBA in Global Marketing Management. She has extensive global experience having lived and worked overseas in both Madrid, Spain, and London, UK, where she held Global portfolio management roles. She spent the past 11 years overseas and repatriated to the United States a year ago to focus on driving Innovation. She is fluent in English and Spanish. Heidi is now taking her broad ranging communications expertise, multiple vertical market and extensive customer facing experience plus global presence having lived and worked in 3 countries plus roles spanning over 40 countries towards driving Innovation. She heads up an Innovation team focused on identifying, creating opportunities and investments in adjacent markets and technologies to drive growth. Heidi is also responsible globally for the Innovation framework which harnesses and drives ideas from within the teams to create new solutions for the market. She is currently based in the Chicago area working at the Motorola Solutions Global headquarters. ERIC ISAACS Eric D. Isaacs, a prominent University of Chicago physicist, is Presi- dent of the University of Chicago Argonne, LLC, and Director of Argonne National Laboratory. Before becoming Argonne Director, Isaacs served as Argonne’s deputy laboratory director for programs, with responsibility for leading the laboratory’s strategic planning process and overseeing the laboratory-directed research and development program as well as its educational programs. Earlier he distinguished himself both as director of the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne and as professor of physics in the University of Chicago’s James Franck Institute. During his 13-year tenure at Bell Laboratories, he was a member of the technical staff, director of the Materials Physics Research Department and director of the Semiconductor Physics Department. He received a Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1988 in the area of magnetic semiconductors and was a postdoctoral fellow at Bell Laboratories (1988-1990) studying magnetism and correlated electronic systems, mostly with synchrotron-based X-ray techniques. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and served on a number of national scientific advisory committees, including the Basic Energy Sciences

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162 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY Advisory Committee. He is author or co-author of more than 140 scientific papers and presentations. JERRY S. H. LEE Jerry Lee serves as the Deputy Director for the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives (CSSI). He provides scientific input to the planning, development, and deployment of programs to carry out the Center’s mission to build exploratory initiatives focused on the integration of advanced technologies, trans-disciplinary approaches, infrastructures, and standards, to accelerate the creation of publicly available, broadly accessible, multi-dimensional data, knowledge, and tools to empower the entire cancer research continuum for patient benefit. Dr. Lee serves and leads various trans-NCI working groups and also represents CSSI at various NIH, HHS, and external committees and other activities to develop effective partnerships across Federal agencies, and to build collaborations with key external stakeholders. Through the CSSI Office of the Director, he is responsible for scientific, programmatic, and operational management of CSSI’s broad scientific portfolio (~$145 million per year) carried out by more than 80 staff members within CSSI offices including: The Cancer Genome Program Office (TCGA PO), Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research (OCNR), Office of Biorespositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR), Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG), Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), and Office of Physical Sciences-Oncology (OPSO). Dr. Lee also currently serves as Acting Director of TCGA PO. Dr. Lee's efforts facilitate the execution of cross-disciplinary strategies and synergies in key areas of research and training to support these emerging fields. His past experience at NIH includes serving as a program manager for the NCI’s Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies (IMAT) program and the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer program, where he was Program Director of fellowships to support multidisciplinary training in cancer nanotechnology. Dr. Lee's previous research experiences in coordinating collaborations among the Naval Research Laboratory, NCI-Frederick Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University Medical Oncology Division, and the Institute for NanoBioTechnology also contribute to carrying out his current efforts. Scientifically, Dr. Lee has extensive research experience in using engineering-based approaches to examine mechanisms of age-related diseases and cancer progression focused on combining cell biology, molecular biology, and engineering to understand various cellular reactions to external stimuli. Specifically, Dr. Lee's research has emphasized increasing the understanding of RhoGTPase-mediated nuclear and cellular mechanical responses to fluid flow, 3D culture, and contributions to laminopathies such as progeria. He has co- authored numerous papers, two book chapters, one book, and has spoken at various cell biological and biomedical conferences.

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APPENDIX B 163 Dr. Lee currently serves as adjunct assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University, where he also earned his bachelor's degree in biomedical engineering and Ph.D. degree in chemical and biomolecular engineering. ALICIA LÖFFLER Alicia Löffler is globally recognized as a leader in biotechnology education and life science entrepreneurship. She consults widely with start-ups in the United States, Asia and Europe. Dr. Löffler is the Director of the Kellogg Center for Biotechnology Management. The center is an educational and research organization focused on management of the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and medical device sector. Dr Löffler launched the center in 2001 and is responsible for the center’s strategies and operations. Previous to this position, she directed the University-wide Northwestern University Center for Biotechnology (sciences, engineering and Medical School). Dr. Löffler created the Center's educational programs including the Master’s Program in Biotechnology, the Summer Biotechnology Institute, and career development programs. Dr. Löffler served as advisor of: Baird Venture Partners; founding Board Member of the Biotechnology Institute, Washington, DC; Biopharmaceutical Center at the WHU in Koblenz, Germany, and multiple biotechnology companies. She consulted extensively on technology assessment issues for major pharmaceutical companies and Universities in the United States. She also served at as the Board Member and Past-Chair, Council for Biotechnology Centers (BIO), and Board Member, Emerging Companies, Biotechnology Industry Organization and the Governor’s Edgar Council for Biotechnology. She was recently named one of the Tech 100 stars by Crain’s Chicago Business and received the “Women in Black” I-Street award. She is completing her second book, Rethinking the Biotechnology Model. Dr. Löffler received her B.S. from the University of Minnesota, Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts, and post-doctoral in biochemical engineering from Caltech. DAVID MILLER David Miller is President and chief executive officer of the Illinois Biotechnology Industry Organization—better known world-wide as iBIO®. iBIO’s mission is to make Illinois and the surrounding Midwest one of the world’s top life sciences centers: a great place to do business, and a great place to grow new technology ventures. iBIO’s membership develops and markets agricultural, industrial, and medical applications. Miller is also President, chief executive officer, co-founder and a member of the Board of Directors of the iBIO Institute, a public charity. The mission of the iBIO Institute is to orchestrate business leadership in delivery of world-class educational programs and job-creating new technology ventures.

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164 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY Prior to joining iBIO, Miller held executive positions for technology startups in Silicon Valley, Chicago, and Wisconsin. Before that, he served as business aide for the Mayor of Madison, Wisconsin, where he initiated a world- first quality-productivity effort and drove the City’s establishment of the heralded University of Wisconsin Research Park. Miller also led successful projects for major divisions of Fortune 500 companies. He is the recipient of the 2009 Abraham Lincoln National Agriculture Award for Technology, and a member of the Board of Governors of Chicago Innovation Mentors, a joint undertaking in support of entrepreneurs founded by iBIO Institute, Northwestern University, the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois at Chicago,. He is also a member of the External Advisory Board of the Chicago Biomedical Consortium, a collaboration among scientists at those three universities funded by $50+ million in grants from the Searle Family Funds at the Chicago Community Trust. Miller earned his B.A. degree from Tufts University and his J.D. from the Case Western Reserve University School of Law. CHAD MIRKIN Chad A. Mirkin is the Director of the International Institute for Nanotechnology and the George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and Professor of Medicine. Professor Mirkin is a chemist and a world-renowned nanoscience expert, who is known for his development of nanoparticle-based biodetection schemes, the invention of Dip-Pen Nanolithography, and contributions to supramolecular chemistry, nanoelectronics, and nanooptics. He is the author of over 440 manuscripts and over 400 patents and applications, and the founder of three companies, Nanosphere, NanoInk, and Aurasense which are commercializing nanotechnology applications in the life science and semiconductor industries. Currently, he is listed as the most cited (based on total citations) chemist in the world with the second highest impact factor and the top most cited nanomedicine researcher in the world. At present, he is a member of President Obama's Council of Advisors for Science and Technology. Dr. Mirkin has been recognized for his accomplishments with over 60 national and international awards. These include the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Taylor Award, Havinga Medal, the Gustavus John Esselen Award, the Biomedical Engineering Society's Distinguished Achievement Award, a Department of Defense NSSEFF Award, the Pittsburgh Analytical Chemistry Award, the ACS Inorganic Nanoscience Award, the iCON Innovator of the Year Award, a NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, the Collegiate Inventors Award, the National Inventors Hall of Fame (2002, 2004), an Honorary Doctorate Degree from Dickinson College, the Pennsylvania State University Outstanding Science Alumni Award, the ACS Nobel Laureate Signature Award for Graduate Education in Chemistry, a Dickinson College Metzger-Conway Fellowship, the

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APPENDIX B 165 2003 Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences, the Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology, the Leo Hendrick Baekeland Award, Crain’s Chicago Business “40 under 40 Award,” the Discover 2000 Award for Technological Innovation, I-Street Magazine’s Top 5 List for Leading Academics in Technology, the Materials Research Society Young Investigator Award, the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, the PLU Fresenius Award, the Harvard University E. Bright Wilson Prize, the BF Goodrich Collegiate Inventors Award, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Award, the DuPont Young Professor Award, the NSF Young Investigator Award, the Naval Young Investigator Award, the Beckman Young Investigator Award, and the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation New Faculty Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Mirkin has served on the Editorial Advisory Boards of over twenty scholarly journals. At present he is a member of the Editorial Advisory Boards of Journal of American Chemical Society, Angewandte Chemie (International Edition), Accounts of Chemical Research, Advanced Materials, BioMacromolecules, Macromolecular Bioscience, SENSORS, Encyclopedia of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Chemistry-A European Journal, Chemistry & Biology, Nanotechnology Law & Business, The Scientist, Journal of Materials Chemistry, and Journal of Cluster Science, Plasmonics. He is the founding editor of the journal Small, one of the premier international nanotechnology journals, and he has co-edited two bestselling books on nanobiotechnology. Dr. Mirkin holds a B.S. degree from Dickinson College (1986, elected into Phi Beta Kappa) and a Ph.D. degree in chemistry from the Pennsylvania State University (1989). He was an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology prior to becoming a chemistry professor at Northwestern University in 1991. ROGER MOODY Roger Moody joined Nanosphere in 2007 as Chief Financial Officer and Vice President of Finance & Administration. He also serves as the Company’s Treasurer and Secretary. Mr. Moody has more than 20 years of experience in leading finance, corporate development and operations for high- growth healthcare and technology companies. Previously, Mr. Moody spent six years at Medsn, a medical education company where he joined as chief financial officer and chief operating officer. Mr. Moody also served as chief financial officer and led corporate development for two private venture-backed companies sold to strategic partners. Additionally, Mr. Moody provided mergers and acquisition and strategic advisory services to technology and healthcare companies for Volpe Brown Whelan & Company. Mr. Moody began his career at IBM. Mr. Moody received his B.S. from Syracuse University and his M.B.A. from the University of Chicago, Graduate School of Business.

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166 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY DAVID MOSENA David R. Mosena is the sixth President and CEO of Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, which opened in l933. One of the world's largest, most popular and well-known science and technology museums, MSI welcomes an average of 1.5 million guests annually, presents a wide range of iconic and cutting-edge exhibits and offers strong education programs designed to inspire and motivate student interest in science and technology and train teachers to improve science instruction in primary and secondary schools. In December 2010, the Museum concluded a $205 million capital campaign to renew its permanent exhibitions, transform its education programs and reinvent the guest experience. The Museum’s new exhibitions have won international acclaim, and its education programs provide life-changing experiences to 5,000 inner city youth each year. Courses provided to up to 1,000 science teachers annually are changing how science is taught in the classroom and improving student achievement. Mr. Mosena currently serves on the Board of the Association of Science Technology Centers in Washington, DC. Active in Chicago’s civic and business community, he served as Chairman of the Interim Board of the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority (which owns and operates McCormick Place and Navy Pier), Co- Chaired the Transition Committee for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, is a member of the Board of Directors of the Chicago Convention & Tourism Bureau, a member of the Illinois Institute of Technology’s College of Science and Letters Board of Overseers and a member of the Metropolis Strategies Board. He is also a member of the Commercial Club and the Economic Club of Chicago. He served as Chairman of the Commission on Chicago Landmarks from 1999 to 2010 and Chairman of the Board of the University of Chicago’s K-12 Laboratory Schools from 1993 to 1999. Before his appointment to lead MSI in 1997, Mr. Mosena was President of the Chicago Transit Authority, the nation's second largest transit system delivering bus and train service to the City of Chicago and 38 suburbs and providing 1.5 million rides per day. From 1992 to l996, Mr. Mosena served as Chicago Commissioner of Aviation, overseeing the expansion and operations of Chicago's airport system, including O'Hare and Midway Airports. During his leadership of Chicago's airports, O'Hare's International Terminal was completed, along with the automated people mover system. At Midway Airport, he initiated the design, financing and construction of $1 billion in landside improvements, including the new terminal and its 41 gates. Prior to being appointed Aviation Commissioner, Mr. Mosena served as Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley's Chief of Staff, coordinating the activities of all city departments, as well as focusing on issues of city development, and before that as Chicago’s City Planning Commissioner.

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170 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY Technology, all in chemical engineering. He has served on the faculty of the University of Arizona since 1977, as head of the chemical and environmental engineering department from 1990 to 1998, and as dean from 1998 until January 2009. During his service as dean, Peterson was a member of the executive board for the engineering deans' council (EDC) of ASEE and was vice-chair of EDC from 2007 to 2008. He has served on the board of directors of the Council for Chemical Research and on the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). He was one of the founding members of the global engineering deans' council, and at Arizona, he made global education experiences a high priority for his engineering students. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and a recipient of the Kenneth T. Whitby Award from the American Association for Aerosol Research. The ENG Directorate at NSF provides critical support for the nation's engineering research and education activities, and is a driving force behind the education and development of the nation's engineering workforce. With a budget of approximately $640 million, the directorate supports fundamental and transformative research, the creation of cutting-edge facilities and tools, broad interdisciplinary collaborations, and through its centers and Small Business Innovation Research programs, enhances the competitiveness of U.S. companies. PATRICK QUINN Pat Quinn was sworn in as the 41st Governor of Illinois on January 29, 2009. He won election to a full term on November 2, 2010. Governor Quinn has focused on restoring integrity to state government and, in his first official act, signed an executive order establishing the Illinois Reform Commission to examine ethics rules and practices in state government. He also led passage of fundamental legislation to return integrity to the state pension boards, ensure state agency compliance with Freedom of Information laws and increase transparency of state boards and commissions. Dedicated to investing in Illinois’ economy, Quinn worked with the General Assembly to pass a $31 billion capital construction jobs program to create and retain more than 436,000 jobs over six years. Since taking office he has made tough, responsible choices to ensure that the state of Illinois can afford to pay its bills. The Governor's efforts to boost the Illinois economy include passing business and tech-friendly legislation that strengthens Illinois' place as capitol of the Midwest. He created the Illinois Innovation Council to promote and attract innovation-driven entrepreneurs to the state. For his work increasing Illinois’ economic, scientific, and technological output, Quinn was named the 2011 Governor of the Year by the Biotechnology Industry Organization. In addition to working to double state exports by 2015, he has also made significant

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APPENDIX B 171 investments in transportation, education and healthcare infrastructure that will create jobs and keep Illinois competitive in the 21st century global economy. Quinn has served the people of Illinois for more than 30 years as both a citizen and a public official. He has organized grassroots petition drives signed by more than four million voters, walked across the state in support of decent health care for all, and proposed historic tax reform for working families. He was elected Lieutenant Governor in 2002 and re-elected in 2006, serving until his succession as Governor in January 2009, and served one term as State Treasurer from 1991 to 1995. He also served as commissioner of the Cook County Board of (Property) Tax Appeals and as revenue director for the City of Chicago. As Lieutenant Governor, Quinn created the Illinois Military Family Relief Act, which provides financial assistance to families of Illinois National Guard members and reservists called to active duty. The fund has distributed more than $10 million to Illinois military families. Quinn was born in Chicago and raised in Hinsdale and graduated from Northwestern University School of Law and Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. He is the father of two sons. NORBERT RIEDEL Norbert G. Riedel is corporate vice president and chief science and Innovation officer of Baxter International Inc., having served in that capacity since March 2001. Before assuming this role, Dr. Riedel served as president of the recombinant proteins business unit and vice president of research and development within Baxter's BioScience business. Prior to joining Baxter in 1998, he was head of worldwide biotechnology and worldwide core research functions at Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi-Aventis. Dr. Riedel is a member of the Board of Directors of Medigene AG, ARIAD Pharmaceuticals Inc., and the Illinois Biotechnology Industry Organization. He also serves on the Advisory Board of Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management Center for Biotechnology, the McCormick School of Engineering and was most recently appointed by Illinois Governor Pat Quinn to the newly formed Illinois Innovation Council. He is also a member of the board of trustees of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Dr. Riedel received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Frankfurt in 1983. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University from 1984 to 1987, assistant professor and associate professor of medicine and biochemistry at Boston University School of Medicine from 1987 to 1991, and a visiting professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992. He remains affiliated with Boston University as an adjunct professor and also serves as an adjunct professor of medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. In 2009, Dr. Riedel was elected into the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

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172 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY DENNIS ROBERSON Dennis Roberson is an accomplished executive, educator, and engineer with a strong semiconductor background and a proven track record in technology leadership and business management. Currently active in academia, government and the private sector, Roberson joined Zarlink’s Board in November 2004. Roberson is Vice Provost, Executive Director, and Research Professor with the Illinois Institute of Technology, where he is responsible for providing leadership for a new undergraduate business school focused on entrepreneurship and technology, as well as developing research centers and business ventures in association with public and private sector partners. Previously, Roberson held Vice President and Chief Technical Officer positions with Motorola and NCR Corporation, and held senior executive positions with AT&T and Digital Equipment Corp. He spent 18 years with IBM in a variety of R&D roles, including director of IBM’s labs in Endicott, New York, and Burlington, Vermont. Roberson also serves on the FCC’s (Federal Communications Commission) Technology Advisory Committee, the Board of Directors for FIRST Robotics, and as a technology advisor to government agencies in Japan and Malaysia. RICHARD SILVERMAN Richard B. Silverman is the John Evans Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern University. Professor Silverman received his B.S. degree in chemistry from The Pennsylvania State University in 1968 and his Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry from Harvard University (David H. Dolphin, mentor) in 1974 with time off for a two-year military obligation from 1969 to 1971. After two years as a NIH postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of the late Professor Robert H. Abeles in the Graduate Department of Biochemistry at Brandeis University, he joined the chemistry faculty at Northwestern University. In 1986 he became Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Cell Biology. In 1996 he was named the Arthur Andersen Professor of Chemistry for a period of two years and since 2004 he has been the John Evans Professor of Chemistry. Professor Silverman’s research can be summarized as investigations of enzyme mechanisms and the molecular mechanisms of action, rational design, and syntheses of potential medicinal agents, particularly for central nervous system diseases. Dr. Silverman has formulated and tested new enzymatic hypotheses with the use of novel organic chemical approaches to elucidate enzyme-catalyzed reactions, to design mechanism-based inactivators of enzymes, and to understand the molecular mechanisms of inactivation of enzymes. The enzymes that he studies are not only mechanistically interesting, but also highly relevant to pharmaceutical inhibitor design. For example, with

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APPENDIX B 173 the use of a variety of novel mechanism-based inactivators, Dr. Silverman pioneered and developed the mechanistic work that led to a radical mechanism for the enzyme monoamine oxidase. When he first reported his results in 1980, radical involvement in enzyme-catalyzed reactions was rarely proposed and poorly understood. It is now apparent that radical intermediates in enzyme- catalyzed reactions are quite prevalent. Professor Silverman has received numerous awards for research: DuPont Young Faculty Fellow (1976), Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow (1981- 1985), NIH Research Career Development Awardee (1982-1987), Fellow of the American Institute of Chemists (1985), Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1990), Arthur C. Cope Senior Scholar Award of the American Chemical Society (2003), Alumni Fellow Award from The Pennsylvania State University (2008), and the Perkin Medal from the Society of Chemical Industry (2009). He also is the recipient of several teaching awards including the E. LeRoy Hall Award for Teaching Excellence (1999), the Excellence in Chemistry Education Award from the Northwestern University Chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma Chemistry Fraternity (1999), the Northwestern University Alumni Teaching Award (2000), and the Charles Deering McCormick Chair in Teaching Excellence (2001). Professor Silverman also was awarded a U.S. Army Commendation Medal for meritorious service (1971). Editorial Advisory Boards on which Professor Silverman has served include the following journals: Current Enzyme Inhibition (2004-present), Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry (2003-present), Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2003-present), Letters in Drug Design & Discovery (2003- present), Archiv der Pharmazie- Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry (1995-present), Journal of Enzyme Inhibition and Medicinal Chemistry (1988- present), Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics (1993-2003), and Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (1995-2000). Dr. Silverman has published over 250 research articles and reviews, holds 41 domestic and foreign patents, and has written four books (one translated into German). His book entitled The Organic Chemistry of Drug Design and Drug Action is in its second edition. From 1992 to 2006 he gave two-day short courses on drug design and drug action at the national meetings of the American Chemical Society, as well as at various pharmaceutical companies. He has been a lecturer at the Residential School on Medicinal Chemistry (Drew University) since 1995, presenting lectures on enzyme inhibition and on lead modification. He was elected nominating committee (1990), treasurer (1993-1996), and program chair (2001) of the Division of Biological Chemistry of the American Chemical Society and canvassing committee (1982-1987; chair 1987) and long-range planning committee, Division of Medicinal Chemistry of the American Chemical Society.

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174 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY TYRONE TAYLOR Tyrone C. Taylor is the President of Capitol Advisors on Technology, a technology management and consulting firm. He brings an exceptional combination of hands on experience in technology development and commercialization. He has held senior management positions in the federal government and the private sector and worked extensively in the R&D community. He is the former Director of Washington Relations at the West Virginia High Technology Foundation where he was responsible for developing and managing strategic partnerships with public, private, and academic representatives in the field of technology commercialization. He has provided technical support for technology transfer programs for the Department of Defense, the Department of Commerce, and the Department of Homeland Security, as examples. He also serves as the Chair of the Small Business Division at the National Defense Industrial Association. Mr. Taylor is well known within the federal research and development (R&D) organizations and small business community as an authoritative source with hands on experience in technology transfer and commercialization. Reflecting his broad experience, Mr. Taylor has been asked to serve on numerous technology advisory committees at organizations such as the National Research Council, the National Science Foundation, and the Center for Commercialization of Advanced Technologies, and others. Congressional science and technology committees have also called on him to assess the impact of potential legislation affecting the technology community. As an executive on loan, Mr. Taylor represented the entire federal R&D community as the Washington, DC, Representative for the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer, a congressionally chartered organization. In this capacity, he provided leadership in developing legislation that governs the private and public sectors' ability to collaborate in R&D activities, manage intellectual property, and commercialize technologies. Recognized for his efforts by Congress, Mr. Taylor often addresses audiences throughout the United States and abroad on technology development, transfer, and commercialization issues. Mr. Taylor also served as President, Government Operations, and Senior Vice President for Marketing and Business Development for Unisphere, Inc., a technology assessment firm responsible for assessing and transitioning technologies with defense and commercial applications. In this capacity, he aided in the expansion and growth of small businesses and their clients, helping to generate over $25 million in revenue and produce over $64 million in cost savings. Due to his broad technology background, he is able to interact effectively with all aspects of the technology commercialization community including inventors, attorneys, acquisition managers, test and engineering, and marketing, as examples. Mr. Taylor's technology management experience covers such areas as homeland security, medical technologies, energy and environment, advanced materials, infrared imaging, and aerospace.

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APPENDIX B 175 Before joining Unisphere, Mr. Taylor served in the Senior Executive Service in a variety of executive management positions at NASA. He brings extensive program/project experience having managed almost $1 billion in contracts and grants for systems engineering, information systems, facilities management, and technical and administrative services as a member of the International Space Station program, which included Japan, Canada, and the European Space Agency. Tyrone Taylor has a Masters in Business Administration from Southeastern University. He earned an A.B. in business administration from Wilmington College, and has served as Adjunct Professor for numerous technology transfer and commercialization courses. Other activities include serving on the board of Pediatric AIDS/HIV Care in Washington, DC, and nurturing businesses in the assistive technology arena. BILL TESTA Bill Testa is a vice president and director of regional research in the economic research department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Testa has written widely in the areas of economic growth and development, the Midwest economy and state–local public finance. He directed a comprehensive long-term study and forecast of the Midwest economy, Assessing the Midwest Economy: Looking Back for the Future, and has fashioned a series of conferences on school reform. Testa currently serves as economics editor of the Chicago Fed Letter and on the editorial board of Economic Development Quarterly. His weekly “Midwest Economy” web column, which can be found on the Federal Reserve Bank’s web site, has become a widely read and nationally quoted feature. Testa also serves in an advisory or director’s capacity to a variety of professional journals, nonprofit organizations, advisory boards and economic development initiatives in the Midwest. He chairs the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Council on Economic Education and serves on the boards of the Global Chicago Center of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and the Economic Development Council of Chicago. Prior to joining the Chicago Fed in 1982, Testa was a visiting faculty member in the economics department at Tulane University in New Orleans and a graduate research fellow at the Academy for Contemporary Problems in Columbus, Ohio. He currently lectures at DePaul University’s College of Commerce. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Testa received his undergraduate degree from Northwestern University in 1975 and a Ph.D. in economics from the Ohio State University in 1981.

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176 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY MATTHEW TIRRELL Matthew Tirrell, a pioneering researcher in the fields of biomolecular engineering and nanotechnology, is the founding Pritzker Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering. Tirrell specializes in the manipulation and measurement of the surface properties of polymers, materials that consist of long, flexible, chain molecules. His work combines microscopic measurements of intermolecular forces with creation of new structures. His work has provided new insight into polymer properties, especially surface phenomena such as adhesion, friction, and biocompatibility, and new materials based on self- assembly of synthetic and bio-inspired materials. Tirrell comes to UChicago from the University of California at Berkeley, where he has served since 2009 as the Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professor and chair of the Department of Bioengineering, as professor of materials science and engineering and chemical engineering, and as a faculty scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He has received many honors, including election to both the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Prior to his appointment at Berkeley, Tirrell served for a decade as dean of engineering at UC Santa Barbara, where he helped build the program's national prominence. Tirrell began his academic career in 1977 at the University of Minnesota, where he served as Shell Distinguished Chair in Chemical Engineering, Earl E. Bakken Professor of Biomedical Engineering, director of the Biomedical Engineering Institute, and head of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science. Tirrell moved to the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1999, where for a decade he was Professor of Chemical Engineering, Materials, Biomolecular Science and Engineering, and Richard A. Auhll Professor and Dean of the College of Engineering. He received his bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from Northwestern University in 1973 and his doctoral degree in polymer science and engineering from the University of Massachusetts in 1977. ERIC TOONE Eric Toone is the Principal Deputy Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy (ARPA-E), responsible for oversight of all of ARPA-E including direct oversight of ARPA-E’s Electrofuels program. In addition to his role at ARPA-E, Toone is currently the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Biochemistry at Duke University. Toone is a scientific founder of two venture-backed companies: Aerie Pharmaceuticals, a research-based ophthalmology company, and Vindica Pharmaceuticals, a nitric oxide delivery company.

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APPENDIX B 177 He has served as a permanent member of the Bioorganic and Natural Products Study Section at the National Institutes of Health, and is currently a member of the NSERC Organic & Inorganic Review panel (Canada). Toone has authored over 100 scientific papers and over 30 patents. He is an associate editor of the journal Biopolymers and the editor in chief of the monograph series Advances in Enzymology. He studied chemistry as an undergraduate at the University of Guelph, graduating in 1983. That same year he moved to the University of Toronto to begin graduate studies with Professor J. Bryan Jones. Toone graduated from the University of Toronto in 1988 and moved to Harvard University to continue his studies with Professor George Whitesides. JOSEPH WALSH Joseph (Jay) Walsh began his service as the University's Vice President for Research on December 1, 2007. Walsh formerly served as senior associate dean of McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science (MEAS), where he is a professor of biomedical engineering. Walsh received a bachelor's and master's degree in electrical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Immediately following receipt of his Ph.D. in medical engineering from Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Walsh joined the Northwestern faculty in 1988. He played an increasingly important role at McCormick, first as associate dean for graduate studies and research and later as senior associate dean. Walsh's early research on laser-tissue interactions helped frame the understanding of laser ablation; this work formed the scientific foundation for now standard laser-based procedures in medicine and surgery. In the past decade, his research has focused on diagnostic and therapeutic applications of light. Walsh and collaborators in otolaryngology have demonstrated the optical stimulation of sensory nerves with one goal being high spatial resolution stimulation for improved cochlear prosthetics. He is also working with a team of investigators from his home department and chemistry to develop optical sensors for quantification of analytes such as glucose with the goal of improving diabetes management. In collaboration with clinicians in obstetrics and gynecology, dermatology, and urology on the Chicago campus and at Evanston- Northwestern Healthcare, he has developed a polarization-based optical imaging system for improved detection of various lesions. His current projects are each supported by the National Institutes of Health. Walsh has also excelled as a teacher and University citizen. In 1997 he was recognized as McCormick's Teacher of the Year; in 2005 he was designated Advisor of the Year. Among Walsh's broader University service has been his service as chair of the Program Review Council; his leadership of the committee that developed the current (RAS) model for graduate student tuition; and his

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178 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY membership on The Graduate School Administrative Board and the Evanston Campus Planning Advisory Committee. External to Northwestern, Walsh has played active roles in service as the president of the American Society for Lasers in Medicine and Surgery (2003 to 2004) and as the chair for six international conferences. CHARLES WESSNER Charles Wessner is a National Academy Scholar and Director of the Program on Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. He is recognized nationally and internationally for his expertise on innovation policy, including public-private partnerships, entrepreneurship, early-stage financing for new firms, and the special needs and benefits of high-technology industry. He testifies to the U.S. Congress and major national commissions, advises agencies of the U.S. government and international organizations, and lectures at major universities in the United States and abroad. Reflecting the strong global interest in innovation, he is frequently asked to address issues of shared policy interest with foreign governments, universities, research institutes, and international organizations, often briefing government ministers and senior officials. He has a strong commitment to international cooperation, reflected in his work with a wide variety of countries around the world. Dr. Wessner's work addresses the linkages between science-based economic growth, entrepreneurship, new technology development, university- industry clusters, regional development, small-firm finance and public-private partnerships. His program at the National Academies also addresses policy issues associated with international technology cooperation, investment, and trade in high-technology industries. Currently, he directs a series of National Academy studies centered on government measures to encourage entrepreneurship and support the development of new technologies and cooperation among industry, universities, laboratories, and government to capitalize on the nation’s investments in research. Foremost among these is a congressionally mandated study of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, reviewing the operation and achievements of this $2.5 billion award program for small companies and start-ups. The National Academies will release in July a major study on best practice in global innovation programs, entitled Rising to the Challenge: U.S. Innovation Policy for the Global Economy. Today’s meeting on “Building the Illinois Innovation Economy” forms part of a complementary analysis entitled Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State & Regional Innovation Initiatives. The overarching goal of Dr. Wessner’s work is to develop a better understanding of how we can bring new technologies forward to address global challenges in health, climate, energy, water, infrastructure, and security.

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APPENDIX B 179 TERESA WOODRUFF Teresa K. Woodruff, Ph.D. (Thomas J. Watkins Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Feinberg School of Medicine and Professor of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. Ph.D. 1983, Northwestern University). As a reproductive endocrinologist, Dr. Woodruff has spent the better part of her research career focusing on female reproductive health and infertility. To that end, she was made Chief of the newly created Division of Fertility Preservation at the Feinberg School of Medicine. Combining this effort with her work on two R01 NIH grants, a P01 grant and core facility, and her work as director of two NIH funded center grants: The Center for Reproductive Research (U54) and the Oncofertility Consortium (UL1), Dr. Woodruff has established a team of oncologists, fertility specialists, social scientists, educators and policy makers to translate her research to the clinical care of women who will lose their fertility due to cancer treatment. To describe this effort, she coined the term oncofertility, a word that is now officially recognized as a new 'slang' term in the English language. She has edited two books on the topic, the first titled simply Oncofertility (Springer, 2007) where the scope of the problem and current technology, clinical practice tables, procedural guidelines and patient stories are collected. Her second book, to be released in 2010, is titled Oncofertility: Ethical, Legal, Social, and Medical Perspectives (Springer Publishing) and discusses the ethical, religious, economic, and legal issues surrounding fertility preservation. She has been an advocate for sex- and gender inclusivity and study in basic science, translational studies and clinical trials and is the Founder and Director of the Institute for Women’s Health Research. As an educator and mentor, she encourages young women to pursue careers in the sciences, and has developed the Oncofertility Saturday Academy in conjunction with the Young Women’s Leadership Charter School as a way to involve high school girls in college level science. She serves on the Endocrine Society Council and the Society for the Study of Reproduction Board of Directors. Her awards include the Distinguished Teaching Award (2000), the Mentor of the Year Award (2009) and the Distinguished Woman in Medicine and Science (2009) from Northwestern University. She was also honored by the Alumnae of Northwestern University with their Distinguished Alumnae Award (2008). She has been honored nationally with awards from the American Women in Science (AWIS) (2008) Innovator Award, the American Medical Women Association (AMWA) Gender Equity Award (2009), and the “Speaking of Women's Health” Distinguished Service Award (2007). She was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2005) and awarded the Endocrine Society’s Richard E. Weitzman Memorial Award (2000). She is the 2010 recipient of the Feinberg School of Medicine Tripartite Legacy Award, the inaugural recipient of the Young Women’s Leadership Charter School’s Girl

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180 BUILDING THE ILLINOIS INNOVATION ECONOMY Power Award, and is the recipient of an honorary doctorate from Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. ROBERT WOLCOTT Robert Wolcott is the Executive Director of the Kellogg Innovation Network (KIN) and a Senior Lecturer of Entrepreneurship & Innovation at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. He teaches corporate innovation and entrepreneurship for Kellogg in Evanston, Miami, and Hong Kong (with HKUST). Formerly a Visiting Professor at the Keio Business School (Tokyo, Japan). Advisor to NORDEN, the Nordic Innovation Center, Nordic Council of Ministers, Oslo, Norway, and a member of the Global Technology Council of Kraft Foods, Inc. His new book, with Dr. Michael Lippitz, Grow From Within: Mastering Corporate Entrepreneurship and Innovation (McGraw-Hill) launched in October, 2009. Wolcott’s work has appeared in MIT Sloan Management Review, The Wall Street Journal, Advertising Age, BusinessWeek, The Financial Times (UK/European Edition) and The New York Times. He is a frequent speaker at events worldwide. In 2003, Wolcott began leading the Kellogg Innovation Network, created as a key program within Professor Mohan Sawhney’s Center for Research in Technology and Innovation. The KIN’s annual summit, KIN Global, takes place in late Spring and includes leaders from around the world from business, government, academia, non-profits and the arts who collaborate around issues of significance for their organizations and for humanity. . Wolcott also co-founded and serves as Managing Partner of Clareo Partners LLC, a corporate strategy and innovation management consultancy specializing in new business creation and growth (). Subsidiary Clareo Capital owns equity in companies in social enterprise and luxury markets. Clareo’s headquarters, Clareo Studio, created in partnership with Herman Miller, Inc., serves as a collaboration space for special events, corporate off-sites and performances dedicated to innovation, entrepreneurship, social awareness and general inspiration. Wolcott received a B.A., European and Chinese History; and an M.S. and Ph.D., Industrial Engineering & Management Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. He and his wife, Ada Yung, have a young daughter, Jolie, and reside in Chicago, Illinois.